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Dignity in care

The Dignity in Care Campaign, launched in November 2006, aims to stimulate national debate around the need for people receiving care services to be treated with dignity and respect.

The dignity challenge

As part of the campaign, health and social care organisations have been asked to meet the dignity challenge, which states that high-quality care services that respect people's dignity should:

  • Have a zero tolerance of all forms of abuse;
  • Support people with the same respect you would want for yourself or family member;
  • Treat each person as an individual by offering a personalised service;
  • Enable people to maintain the maximum possible level of independence, choice and control;
  • Listen and support people to express their needs and wants;
  • Respect people's right to privacy;
  • Ensure people feel able to complain without fear of retribution;
  • Engage with family members and carers as care partners;
  • Assist people to maintain confidence and a positive self-esteem; and
  • Act to alleviate people's loneliness and isolation.

Part of the work we are doing to meet this challenge is to ask care organisations in North Yorkshire to sign up to our dignity in care charter.

North Yorkshire's dignity in care charter

The charter underlines what a person can reasonably expect when they need and use care and support services in North Yorkshire. It has been created by us, the Independent Care Group and other partners. Together, we want to ensure that people enjoy the dignity and respect to which they are entitled. You can download a copy of the pdf icon dignity in care charter [51kb].

We are also asking people to become Department of Health dignity in care champions.

Dignity in care champions

A dignity champion is someone who believes that being treated with dignity is a basic human right and that care services must be compassionate, centred on the person receiving the care, as well as efficient. More than two million health and social care staff in the UK work around the clock to provide support and care for those in need. So far, about 11,000 of them have signed up to be dignity champions, including more than 200 in North Yorkshire. You can sign up as a champion via the Dignity in Care network website.

This page was last updated on 20 November 2013