Education, health and care plan guidance for parents and carers

Guidance for parents and carers on completing the education, health and care plan form.

Use the following guidance to help you complete the education, health and care plan form.

This is an opportunity for the child to say something about themselves and is an essential basis for any planning. Be clear about what the young person's views are. Write these views in the first person if they are the young person's own words. Anything that other people said about or on behalf of the young person should be written in the third person.

What people like about me. What I can do well.

This should be a positive introduction and pen portrait of the child or young person. It should describe what the child can do and has achieved. As far as possible the child's own words should be used.

What's important to me now and in the future?

This section should describe the child or young person's long-term aspirations.

It should describe what is important to the child or young person, and what they themselves want to be able to achieve. Things that are important to them might include play, learning, training, communication, care, health, friends and relationships, employment, independent living, housing, community, leisure, travel and inclusion.

How best to support me to engage in decision making and express my feelings and views?

This section should identify ways in which the child or young person prefers to communicate; what support is helpful to enable them to make choices and decisions; and how best to present information and choices.

What is going well for me now?

This section should include all aspects of the young person's life, including their education, home life, social life and independence.

What is not going so well for me now?

Describe things that this plan might have to deal with.

Other important things to know about me and my family

This section should include the child or young person's history, such as their school attendance and any family moves. It should note anything important to know about brothers and sisters or other family members. It should also note any barriers that make it difficult for the child or family to attend appointments or to meet professionals. Examples of these include time of day; day of the week; physical access; communication issues; language issues etc.

Family and/or professionals' views about what is important for the child or young person now

This might include play, learning, training, communication, care, health, friends and relationships, employment, independent living, housing, community, leisure, travel and inclusion.

This section should set out what families and professionals feel is important for the child or young person from their own perspectives. It should be written in the third person and should state whose views they are. This section should include:

  • all of the things that are important to keep the young person healthy and safe;
  • a description of their special educational needs; and
  • should identify what would increase the young person's chances of achieving good life outcomes.

What is important for the child in the future?

This section is based on the views of the family and people who know the young person well. It should add to what the young person has said is important to them in the future.

This section is a description of special educational needs gathered from assessments from the family, education, health and care services, including all the information in the assessment request form.

If there is not a need in some sections, then say so, in order that it is clear that this section has been considered.

Describe any learning and development needs that may require additional or different provision

This should be a brief description of the special educational needs this child has in this area.

This section should include:

  • current National Curriculum levels or other measurable levels of attainment;
  • the level of independent working skills such as concentration, attention, self-motivation and perseverance;
  • the level of group learning skills such as turn taking and sharing, cooperative learning skills and shared attention;
  • the ability to follow classroom and school routines; and
  • personal organisation for learning.

Desired learning outcomes

This section should include:

  • a range of desired learning outcomes over varying timescales, which describe what the child or young person needs to achieve by the end of a phase or stage of education in order for them to progress successfully to the next phase or stage. These should be specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-bound (i.e. SMART);
  • steps towards meeting the outcomes; and
  • the arrangements for monitoring progress, including review and transition review arrangements and the arrangements for setting and monitoring shorter term.

Special educational provision required

These sections should specify the provision required for each area of needs and the identified desired outcomes in the previous two sections.

The sections should include a description of:

  • the actions, programmes and interventions that will make a difference in the education setting, at home or in the community;
  • what additional or different resources will be needed to carry out these actions;
  • detailed and specific provision which can be quantified in terms, for example, of type, hours, frequency of support and level of expertise; and
  • who will provide the support, such as professionals from education, health, and social care, voluntary organisations, family and friends and the local community.

Describe any communication and interaction needs that may require additional or different provision that can be delivered by non-medical personnel.

This should be a brief description of the special educational needs this young person has in this area.

This section should include a sentence to indicate whether or not the child has any needs in this area. If 'yes' then include a description of:

  • the child's receptive language including their understanding;
  • the child's expressive language including clarity of communication; and
  • any social communication difficulties such as taking turns in conversation, understanding the listener's needs and making eye contact.

Describe any social, emotional or mental health needs that may require additional or different provision that can be delivered by non-medical personnel.

This should be a brief description of the special educational needs this young person has in this area.

This section should include a sentence to indicate whether or not the child has any needs in this area. If 'yes' then:

  • Include a description of the child's social functioning such as whether they are settled and happy in school; whether they have friends in or out of school; whether they can join in games or leisure activities with another child or group of children; and whether their self-care skills are appropriate for their age including eating, dressing, personal hygiene, life skills and use of public transport.
  • Include a description of any emotional or mental health needs. Bear in mind that inappropriate behaviour is no longer classified as a special educational need and assessment should consider instead whether it is caused by a SEN, such as a learning or communication problem or is a product of social factors in the setting or in the wider community.

Describe any sensory or physical needs that may require additional or different provision that can be delivered by non-medical personnel.

This should be a brief description of the special educational needs this young person has in this area.

This section should include a description of:

  • the child or young person's general health;
  • the child or young person's physical development and whether it is appropriate for their age, and whether they have fine or gross or mobility difficulties;
  • any physical needs the child or young person may have; and
  • any sensory difficulties or state that there are no concerns about hearing or vision.

Describe any health, medical or therapy needs that may require additional or different provision from the health services directly.

This should be a brief description of health needs that health personnel will actually deal with or directly contribute to this young person's outcomes, including preparing for adulthood and independent living.

This section must specify any health needs identified through the needs assessment which relate to the child or young person's special educational needs.

Other health care needs can be specified which are not related to the child or young person's SEN but might require management in a special educational setting.

Any health provision reasonably required by the learning difficulties or disabilities

This might include anything relevant from an individual health care plan.

Provision should be detailed and specific and should normally be quantified, for example, in terms of the type of support and who will provide it.

It should be clear how the provision will support achievement of the outcomes.

Health care provision reasonably required may include specialist support and therapies, such as medical treatments and delivery of medications, occupational therapy and physiotherapy, a range of nursing support, specialist equipment, wheelchairs and continence supplies. It could include highly specialist services needed by only a small number of children which are commissioned centrally by NHS England (such as therapeutic provision for young offenders in the secure estate).

Working in conjunction with the local clinical commissioning group we may also choose to specify other health care provision reasonably required by the child or young person, which is not linked to their learning difficulties or disabilities, but which should sensibly be co-ordinated with other services in the plan.

Describe any social care needs that may require additional or different provision.

Consider accommodation, personal care needs, caring for others, short breaks, preparing for adulthood and independent living.

This section must include any social care needs identified through the EHC needs assessment which relate to the child or young person's SEN or which require provision for a child or young person under 18 under section 2 of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970.

We may also choose to specify other social care needs which are not linked to the child or young person's SEN or to a disability. This could include reference to any child in need or child protection plan which a child may have relating to other family issues such as neglect. Inclusion must only be with the consent of the child and their parents.

Any social care provision which must be made under section 2 of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Person's Act 1970

This section could include:

  • practical assistance in the home;
  • provision or assistance in obtaining recreational and educational facilities at home and outside the home;
  • assistance in travelling to facilities;
  • adaptations to the home;
  • facilitating the taking of holidays;
  • provision of meals at home or elsewhere;
  • provision or assistance in obtaining a telephone and any special equipment necessary to do so; and
  • non-residential short breaks.

Any other social care provision reasonably required by the learning difficulties or disabilities

This might include any adult care provision made under the Care Act 2014.

From year 9, outcomes should reflect the need to ensure young people are preparing for adulthood.

This section should consider:

Desired outcomes and support to prepare for higher education and/or employment such as:

  • training options such as supported internships, apprenticeships and traineeships;
  • support for setting up their own business or micro-enterprise;
  • support in finding a job;
  • learning how to do a job e.g. through work experience opportunities or the use of job coaches; and
  • help in understanding any welfare benefits that might be available when in work.

Desired outcomes and support to prepare for independent living such as:

  • exploration of what decisions the young person wants to make for themselves and planning their role in decision making as they become older;
  • discussion of where the child or young person wants to live in the future, who they want to live with and what support they will need; and
  • local housing options, support in finding accommodation, housing benefits and social care support.

Desired outcomes and support to maintain good health in adult life such as:

  • effective planning with health services of the transition from specialist paediatric services to adult health care;
  • identifying which health professionals will work with them as adults; and
  • ensuring those professionals understand the young person's learning difficulties or disabilities and planning well-supported transitions.

Desired outcomes and support to participate in society such as:

  • mobility and transport support;
  • social and community activities;
  • opportunities for engagement in local decision-making; and
  • support in developing and maintaining friendships and relationships.

This is the family's or young person's preferred, school, college or other setting, having regard to SEN CoP par 9.82: "children and young people should be educated in accordance with their parents' wishes so long as this is compatible with the provision of efficient instruction and training and does not mean unreasonable public expenditure". This will give us an idea of where to begin negotiations but it does not commit us to any particular setting. It will become a named educational provision only in the finalised plan.

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