Make Noise for women’s votes at library’s virtual reality event

Skipton library is teaming up with the BBC Virtual Reality Hub to celebrate the centenary of the first election in which women were able to vote.

An image from the Make Noise virtual reality experience

A virtual reality experience called Make Noise empowers viewers to follow Emmeline Pankhurst’s advice and “make more noise” using an innovative combination of voice technology and virtual reality.

Inspired by the suffragettes, who a century ago spoke up for a women’s right to vote, it will see viewers hum, sing and shout along with actor Nikki Amuka-Bird, who narrates the experience, to change their virtual world. They’ll be transported to a series of colourful and abstract worlds that represent the stages of the suffragettes’ struggle, and are invited to use their own voice and consider what it means to speak up in a world that doesn’t value that voice.

County Councillor Greg White, Executive Member for Libraries, said: “Our libraries are always looking at pushing the boundaries in terms of the services and facilities they offer. This is the second virtual reality experience to be hosted by Skipton library, offering visitors a fresh perspective on important moments in our history.”

Created by BBC VR Hub with Anagram, Make Noise uses archive material to retell the dramatic story of how a few women started one of the most important movements in history. Real suffragettes whose voices are heard in the experience include Edith Pepper, Charlotte Drake, Charlotte Marsh, Mary Richardson, Lillian Lenton, Victoria Liliard, Grace Roe and Elizabeth Dean.

This event follows an earlier team-up between the library and the BBC to present Nothing to be Written, a virtual reality experience that commemorated the centenary of the end of the First World War last month.

Skipton library’s BBC VR pop-up hub will take place on Friday, 14 December, from 2pm to 4.30pm. Booking is essential. Call Skipton library on 01609 534548 to book your 15-minute slot.

This story was published 4 December 2018