Minerals and Waste Joint Plan submitted to inspectorate

North Yorkshire and York has submitted a draft Minerals and Waste Joint Plan to the Government’s Planning Inspectorate for Examination in Public.

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Once approved, the Plan, which is published jointly by North Yorkshire County Council, the North York Moors National Park Authority and City of York Council, will be adopted as the key reference for planning decisions for development up to 2030. 

The published draft Plan has been subject to extensive consultation with residents and stakeholders.  It includes robust protection measures for residents and the environment to guide future minerals and waste planning applications for developments such as fracking, new or extended quarries and new waste management facilities such as recycling and treatment centres.

These measures include an extended buffer zone to protect residential locations as well as environmentally important places such as Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, nature conservation areas and important historic sites. 

The draft Plan and accompanying Policies Map have now been formally submitted to the Planning Inspectorate for examination by an independent planning inspector in public on behalf of the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government.

“This plan has been over four years in the making, and once adopted will become the bible for guiding future planning decisions,” said County Councillor Andrew Lee, executive member for Planning.  “It has been amended and refined over this period by taking into account responses from extensive consultation. 

“The plan is intended to strengthen the protection to the world class environment and landscape of our beautiful county and the health and wellbeing of our residents and interests of our businesses.  The measures in the plan extend the protection already provided in national policy.”

Chris France, Director of Planning for the North York Moors National Park Authority said: “This is an important stage in progressing a planning framework that will provide the right policies for the sustainable use of minerals in an area justly proud of its environmental heritage”

Cllr Ian Gillies, executive member for transport and planning at City of York Council, said: “This is encouraging progress by the partnership to set in place a structure to inform future planning applications.”

It is expected that the draft plan will be examined in public in early 2018.  During the examination the planning inspector will assess whether the Plan has been properly prepared in the light of representations, data and other research.  At the end of that process the planning inspector will recommend whether the plan can be adopted as drafted or whether any changes have to be made. 

Details of the submission documents and supporting details are available to view here.

Documents can also be viewed during normal opening hours at all libraries in North Yorkshire, including mobile libraries and at all main offices of the three Authorities, as well as at District and Borough Council main offices and the National Park Centres.

This story was published 4 December 2017