View the results of previous consultations and details of next steps.

Previous 12 months consultation

In accordance with our statutory duty under The School Admissions (Admission Arrangements and co-ordination of Admission Arrangements) (England) Regulation 2012 we are consulting on proposed school admission arrangements for community and voluntary controlled schools 2023/2024.

The consultation closes on 3 December 2021. If you wish to respond, please email schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk

Voluntary Aided, Foundation, Academy, UTC and Free Schools

The determination of admission arrangements for Voluntary Aided, Foundation, Academy, UTC and Free Schools is a matter for the schools’ governing bodies as the admission authority for the school.  Any comments relating to a Voluntary Aided, Foundation, Academy, UTC or Free Schools should be addressed directly to the contact details as shown.

The following schools are currently consulting on their own admission arrangements:

School

Contact details

 All Saints Church of England Primary School (pdf / 228 KB) admin@allsaints.ycway.uk - This consultation closes on 12th January 2022.
 Coast and Vale Admissions Policy (pdf / 221 KB) c.ferguson@coastandvale.academy
 Hampsthwaite Church of England Primary School (pdf / 226 KB) admin@hampsthwaite.ycway.uk - This consultation closes on 12th January 2022.
 North Rigton Church of England Primary School (pdf / 234 KB) admin@northrigton.ycway.uk - This consultation closes on 12th January 2022.
 Oatlands Infant School (pdf / 225 KB) admin@oatlandsinf.ycway.uk - This consultation closes on 12th January 2022.
 Pannal Primary School (pdf / 225 KB) admin@pannal.ycway.uk - This consultation closes on 12th January 2022.
 Richard Taylor Church of England Primary School (pdf / 259 KB) admin@richardtaylor.ycway.uk - This consultation closes on 12th January 2022.
 Skipton Parish Church of England Primary School (pdf / 291 KB) admin@parish.ycst.co.uk - This consultation closes on 12th January 2022.
 St. Aidan’s Church of England High School (pdf / 238 KB) admissions@staidans.co.uk - This consultation closes on 12th January 2022.
 St. Peter’s Church of England Primary School (pdf / 323 KB) admin@stpeters.ycway.uk - This consultation closes on 12th January 2022.

 Sacred Heart Catholic Primary School, Northallerton (pdf / 530 KB)

St Margaret Clitherow Catholic Academy Trust - pupil.admissions@smccat.org.uk

 St Georges Catholic Primary School, Scarborough (pdf / 508 KB)

 St Mary’s Catholic Primary School, Malton (pdf / 563 KB)

 St Benedict’s Catholic Primary, Ampleforth (pdf / 548 KB)

 St Mary’s Catholic Primary School, Richmond (pdf / 538 KB)

 St Peter’s Catholic Primary School, Scarborough (pdf / 537 KB)

 St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School, Pickering (pdf / 891 KB)

 The Skipton Academy (pdf / 223 KB) admin@theskiptonacademy.co.uk - This consultation closed on 4th January 2022.

 Thomas Hinderwell Primary Academy (pdf / 753 KB)

The David Ross Education Trust - office@thomashinderwell.co.uk

 Riverside School, Tadcaster (pdf / 459 KB) Ian Yapp, Chief Education Officer, the STAR Multi-Academy Trust, c/o Riverside School, Wetherby Road, Tadcaster, North Yorkshire, LS24 9JN – Please note that this consultation closes 17 January 2022.
 St Martin’s CE VA Primary School, Scarborough (pdf / 813 KB) admin@st-martins.n-yorks.sch.uk – please note that this consultation closes on 31 January 2022.
 Egton CE VA Primary School (pdf / 1 MB) Admissions, Egton CE VA Primary School, Egton, Whitby, YO21 1UT – please note that this consultation ends on 14 January 2022
 Barlby High School (pdf / 561 KB) The Chair of the Trust Board Hope Sentamu Learning Trust c/o Rawcliffe Drive Clifton (Without) York YO30 6ZS
 Graham School (pdf / 646 KB)
 George Pindar School (pdf / 590 KB)
 Ermysted’s Grammar School (pdf / 569 KB) admissions@ermysteds.uk

We are keen to hear what you think of the proposal to make changes to the residential offer at Welburn Hall School to accommodate children and young people aged 8 to 19, who have communication and interaction needs (including Autism) and / or learning disability, where there is an assessed need for residential provision. Residential provision would be extended to be available up to a term time basis,38 weeks per year, including weekends.

Background

We want all children and young people with special educational needs and / or disabilities (SEND) in North Yorkshire:

  • To have the best educational opportunities so that they achieve the best outcomes.
  • To be able to attend a school or provision locally, as close to their home as possible, where they can make friends and be part of their local community.
  • To make progress with learning, have good social and emotional health, and to prepare them for a fulfilling adult life.

The local authority has a statutory responsibility under the Children and Families Act 2014 to keep its special educational provision under review, to ensure sufficiency in placements to meet the needs of children and young people with special educational needs and / or disabilities (SEND). Under the same act the local authority also has responsibility for ensuring that the needs of children and young people with special educational needs and / or disabilities (SEND) are suitably assessed and that needs are met.

The current residential offer at Welburn Hall School is for young people aged 16 to 19 who are completing the college course at the school and who have an assessed need for residential provision. Residential placement is available Monday to Friday (4 nights) during term times.

The criteria for assessing a young person’s need for residential provision was updated and agreed in 2017. Since this time the numbers of young people entering into the residential provision at Welburn Hall have been declining. It is forecast that this will make the current residential offer unviable for the school within the next 3 years. This would result in us having no residential offer for children and young people with communication and interaction needs and / or learning disability. 

The current offer at Welburn Hall School results in children and young people with communication and interaction needs and / or learning disability who require residential placement prior to age 16 being placed in Independent settings, sometimes out of county away from their family and community. 

Benefits of the proposed residential offer

The advantages that such an offer aims to bring are:

  • For young people with communication and interaction needs, who have an assessed need for residential placement, to be able to attend a school locally.
  • To be able to offer the right support for young people and their families at the right time – residential provision available to meet assessed need for children and young people with communication and interaction needs from age 8.
  • To seek best use of resources for the local population.

Please tell us your views

Before any changes are made to the residential offer at Welburn Hall School, we are keen to consult with any stakeholders who may be affected by the arrangement. It is important to us that we gather and listen to feedback about the proposal and ensure all considerations have been taken into account. In undertaking this consultation, we are required to follow good practice guidance.

We keen to hear your comments and feedback on the proposal to make changes to the residential offer at Welburn Hall School to enable children and young people from age 8 to 19 with an assessed need for residential provision to be placed here. Residential provision would be available on a term time basis, 38 weeks per year, including weekends. Any member of the public and interested organisations can comment on the proposal.

We have tried to ensure giving feedback is as easy as possible by a range of different methods as follows:

  • Engagement sessions for parents/carers and all professionals
  • Survey
  • Children and young people engagement sessions facilitated by North Yorkshire Voice

The dates and times of engagement sessions for Parents/Carers of children at school:

Date

Time

Wednesday 3 November

6pm

Friday 5 November

10am

The dates and times of engagement sessions for Parents/Carers of other children:

Date

Time

Monday 8 November

9:30am

Tuesday 9 November

6pm

The dates and times of engagement sessions for all professionals:

Date

Time

Tuesday 9 November

9:30am

Friday 12 November

10:30am

Sign up to attend an engagement session here.

Please let us know what you think online.

Complete the survey

We will not be able to offer an individual response to your feedback.

You can request a hard copy of the survey by emailing SEND@northyorks.gov.uk or by writing to:

Central Admin Team
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
North Yorkshire
DL7 8AE

If you would like the information on this page and the survey in a different format, please email SEND@northyorks.gov.uk or write to the address above.

If you want this information in another language you can find more information here, or email SEND@northyorks.gov.uk

Children and Young People - North Yorkshire Voice will be running a number of focus groups and activities to help young people share their views. If you are a young person, and would like to tell us your thoughts on this consultation, please contact North Yorkshire Voice at NYvoice@northyorks.gov.uk  

Deadline for your Feedback

The consultation is open from 14 October 2021 and ends at midnight on 2 December 2021. We will not be able to consider feedback after this date.

After the consultation closes

At the end of the consultation period we will review the feedback and produce a summary report showing the themes and issues raised, which will be reviewed by the County Council Executive for a decision. Responses from individuals will be anonymised.

A summary of the consultation responses and next steps will be available.

Please contact us using one of the methods outlined above to request details as hard copies.

Frequently asked questions

What is this consultation about?

This consultation is about our proposed changes to the residential offer at Welburn Hall School to accommodate children and young people aged 8-19, who have communication and interaction needs (including Autism) and / or learning disability, where there is an assessed need for residential provision. Residential provision would be extended to be available on a term time basis, 38 weeks per year, including weekends.

Why do we need to change the residential off at Welburn Hall School?

The current residential offer at Welburn Hall School is for young people aged 16-19 who are completing the college course at the school and who have an assessed need for residential provision. This offer results in children and young people with communication and interaction needs and / or learning disability who require residential placement prior to age 16 being placed in Independent settings, sometimes out of county away from their family and community. 

It is forecast that the current residential offer will become unviable for the school within the next 3 years. This would result in us having no residential offer for children and young people with communication and interaction needs and / or learning disability.

What difference will the proposed changes make to young people who attend Welburn Hall School?

Young people who attend Welburn Hall school will welcome a wider cohort of learners into their school community. 

Families of current pupils of Welburn Hall School who have an assessed need for residential placement will be able to consider this at the age that it is needed rather than for post 16 only.

Young people moving onto the post 16 college course will attend as day pupils unless there is an assessed need for residential placement.

How will you consult with stakeholders and when?

The consultation will start on 13 October 2021 and conclude on 1 December 2021. Every effort will be made to ensure stakeholders have the opportunity to find out about the proposal and give feedback. We are making contact with known networks and those who represent stakeholders to provide relevant information and offer a full briefing if required. The consultation is for 7 weeks and we hope this will give stakeholders the opportunity to comment.

How will the changes to the residential offer improve SEND services for people who use them?

Young people with communication and interaction needs and / or learning disability who have an assessed need for residential placement will be able to attend a school locally.

Young people and their families will be better able to access the right support at the right time since residential provision will be available to meet assessed need for children and young people with communication and interaction needs and / or learning disability from age 8.

What are the next steps?

Consultation responses and feedback will be collated and reviewed by us at the end of the consultation period. A summary report showing the themes and issues raised will be published on this page.

Summary

The overall objective of the SEND Local Area Strategy is to set the future direction and coordination of support for children and young people with SEND across North Yorkshire. This strategy aims to ensure that statutory partners and key stakeholders have shared aims and ambitions for children and young people with SEND and are working together to provide high quality services.

Our ambition and aim is that all children and young people with SEND have improved outcomes which will ensure they are well prepared for a happy, healthy and fulfilling adult life. Working in partnership with all stakeholders is of critical importance to ensure that children and young people have their needs identified early so that support can be more effective.

Following a period of early, informal engagement in June and July 2021, in partnership with local Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG's), we are seeking views on six key strategic aims developed from feedback of stakeholders.

Background

The number of children and young people identified as having SEND in North Yorkshire has increased since the introduction of the SEND reforms in 2014 through the Children and Families Act and is predicted to continue to do so.

The proportion of the mainstream school population at SEN support has increased from 10.8% in 2017 to 12.32% in 2021 in primary schools and from 6.5% to 10.44% in secondary schools. In addition, the number of children and young people with Education, Health and Care Plans (EHCPs) increased from 1938 in 2015/16 to 3574 in 2020/21. This is a 84.4% rise.

There is a need to develop a new Local Area Strategy for SEND that covers education, health and social care for children and young people aged 0 to 25.

The overarching Local Area Strategy will go beyond the local authorities statutory duties with regards to SEND Education Provision, as set out in our most recent SEND Plan, and include how we work with all partners including young people, parents/carers and Clinical Commissioning Groups to improve outcomes of children and young people.

A Local Area Strategy will ensure that:

  • The work that is being, or needs to be, done to ensure children and young people in North Yorkshire with SEND have the best opportunities, provision and outcomes, is agreed, understood, delivered and monitored.
  • Children and young people with SEND and their families in partnership with those working with them from education, health and social care can shape the way forward.

Recent developments for key stakeholders also means that is timely to now review the strategic direction of the Local Area in relation to SEND and develop a new strategy that is co-produced and implemented moving forward. These key developments include:

  • The relaunch of the North Yorkshire parent/carer forum and the rebrand as Parent Carer Voice North Yorkshire, with a strong focus on co-production.
  • The restructure of the Inclusion service in our Childrens' and Young People Service.
  • Recent review of Social Care support for Disabled Children
  • The reorganisation of Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), in particular the new North Yorkshire CCG.

Local Area SEND Strategy:

The proposed strategy will establish the following key principles:

  • Be ambitious for all children
  • Value the contribution of all
  • Work together to drive improvement
  • Listen and communicate effectively
  • Strive for local solutions
  • Invest in actions that will improve outcomes

Having considered the feedback from the period of early engagement alongside the statutory duties of the local authority and health services the following key strategic aims have been developed:

  • Early identification of need of children and young people with SEND
  • Working together to provide high quality services and provision at the right time
  • Improve outcomes for children and young people with SEND
  • Strengthen communication, engagement and co-production with parents/carers, children and young people
  • Preparing young people for adulthood
  • Achieving best value

Under each strategic aim, and based on feedback, we have set out why it is important, what we envisage success will look like and what we intend to do. More information is available in our draft strategy.

Please tell us your views

Ourselves and the CCG’s that serve North Yorkshire are keen to hear your comments and feedback on the proposal to agree a joint strategy for the local area. Any member of the public and interested organisations can comment on the proposal.

We have tried to ensure giving feedback is as easy as possible by a range of different methods as follows:

  • Engagement sessions for parents/carers and all professionals
  • Survey
  • Children and young people engagement sessions facilitated by North Yorkshire Voice

The dates and times of engagement sessions for Parents/Carers:

Date

Time

Wednesday 10 November

10am

Wednesday 17 November

6pm

Thursday 18 November

10am

Monday 22 November

6pm

The dates and times of engagement sessions for all professionals:

Date

Time

Thursday 11 November

10am

Monday 15 November

10am

Thursday 18 November

6pm

Monday 22 November

10am

Sign up to attend an engagement session here.

Please let us know what you think online.

Complete the survey

We will not be able to offer an individual response to your feedback.

You can request a hard copy or alternative format of the survey by emailing SEND@northyorks.gov.uk or by writing to:

Central Admin Team
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
North Yorkshire
DL7 8AE

If you want this information in another language you can find more information here, or email SEND@northyorks.gov.uk

Children and Young People - North Yorkshire Voice will be running a number of focus groups and activities to help young people share their views. If you are a young person, and would like to tell us your thoughts on this consultation, please contact North Yorkshire Voice at NYvoice@northyorks.gov.uk

 Read the SEND strategy focus group report here. (pdf / 2 MB)

Deadline for your Feedback

The consultation is open from 14 October 2021 and ends at midnight on 2 December 2021. We will not be able to consider feedback after this date.

After the consultation closes

At the end of the consultation period all partners will review the feedback and produce a summary report showing the themes and any issues raised, which will be reviewed by the County Council Executive for a decision in early 2022. Responses from individuals will be anonymised.

A summary of the consultation responses and next steps will be available to view online when the consultation has closed.

This consultation closed on 15 November 2021


The projects are part of the Leeds City Region Transforming Cities Fund (TCF) programme, a major new programme of investment aimed at making it easier to walk, cycle and use public transport.

Consultations took place earlier this year on the early designs of the schemes, and after consideration of that feedback those designs have been amended. We now want your views on the revised proposals.

This is the next stage in projects worth a total of £42m across Skipton, Harrogate and Selby delivered in partnership by the West Yorkshire Combined Authority, North Yorkshire County Council, Craven District Council, Harrogate Borough Council and Selby District Council.

We want to know what you think about the revised proposals and will be hosting a series of online events where you can hear more and ask questions, before completing the online survey.

We are keen to hear how well these revised designs meet the objectives of opening up the towns’ gateways to facilitate and encourage cycling and walking and improve the quality and sense of identity in these locations. You can also help to define the final look of the schemes by giving your views on details like benches and planting

What to do next

Have your say!

We want as many people, businesses and organisations as possible to fill in the online survey and help shape the projects for each town.

Fill in the online survey.

The link above will take you to the West Yorkshire Combined Authority ‘Your Voice’ website, where you can read the proposals for each town, watch videos and see artist’s impressions of the plans. You can also fill in a survey about the proposals you want to comment on, on the above page.

The consultation is running from 18 October 2021 until to 12 November 2021.

Details of how to request accessible formats and give your feedback in other ways are also on the above page.

Attend a live event

Click the links below to attend a live event and hear about the proposals for your town.

Scheme

Date and Time

Join

Selby

Tuesday 19 October at 6pm

Join the Selby event on 19 October

Skipton

Wednesday 20 October at 6pm

Join the Skipton event on 20 October

Harrogate

Thursday 21 October at 6pm

Join the Harrogate event on 21 October

Harrogate

Thursday 28 October at 6pm

Join the Harrogate event on 28 October

Skipton

Wednesday 3 November at 6pm

Join the Skipton event on 3 November

Selby

Thursday 4 November at 6pm

Join the Selby event on 4 November

This consultation closed on 8 November 2021


Introduction

We want to enter into a formal partnership agreement with NHS North Yorkshire CCG (NYCCG) to jointly commission a Targeted and School Based Emotional Wellbeing Service in North Yorkshire on our behalf. This is referred to as a ‘Section 75 Partnership Agreement’.

Section 75 of the National Health Service Act 2006 enables Councils and NHS bodies to work in partnership. The proposed partnership will be for a period of 3 years with a proposed extension of another 2 years following a review.

In keeping with good practice and NHS Act requirements, as potential partners, we want to consult with stakeholders who may be affected by such an agreement being in place.

We have a shared vision to provide an integrated approach to prevention and early help, to try to improve children’s emotional wellbeing and prevent issues escalating.

Both organisations believe that by coordinating this offer and integrating commissioning activity it will enable the best use of resources and ensure that as many young people benefit from this support as possible.

The CCG and the County Council are keen to hear what you think about us using a Section 75 agreement to deliver this service.

1. Background

The County Council and NYCCG are committed to improving children’s’ emotional wellbeing.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) carried out a review of mental health services in North Yorkshire during September 2017 which indicated a requirement for clearer entry points to emotional mental health support. Feedback gathered from professionals, family and children as part of the engagement supported this view. By us working with CCGs in North Yorkshire to jointly commission this work we will be taking steps to ensure that:

  • future services are more closely aligned;
  • seamless pathways between services are promoted, breaking down barriers between services including universal, targeted and specialist services;
  • the services are aligned with the proposals in the Transforming children and young people’s mental health provision green paper, which provides a significant step towards a new joined up approach to mental health support.

2. Benefits of a partnership approach

The advantages that such an arrangement aims to bring are:

  • better planning and commissioning to the meet the needs of the local population;
  • a shared vision of the benefits that the partnership is intended to achieve;
  • jointly agreed objectives of what the partnership wants to achieve;
  • to seek best use of resources for the local population;
  • streamlining service;
  • reducing bureaucracy;
  • mutual learning to inform service improvement.

Please tell us your views

It is important that we gather and listen to feedback about the proposal and ensure all considerations have been taken into account.

If the proposal being consulted on is supported, we and NHS North Yorkshire CCG will use the legislation to put in place a formal partnership agreement to jointly commission a Targeted and School Based Emotional Wellbeing Service in North Yorkshire. The partnership agreement acts as a mechanism to do this.

We are keen to hear your comments and feedback on the proposal to enter into a partnership agreement. Any member of the public and interested organisations can comment on the proposal. This is a 60 day consultation beginning on 10th September 21 and ending at midnight 8th November 2021.

You can tell us your views and give us your suggestions in the following ways:

Fill in the online survey.

Please do not include any personal identifiable information in any of your answers that could identify yourself or another individual.

We will not be able to offer an individual response to your feedback.

If you would like the information on this page and the survey in a different format, please email EmotionalHealth.AndWellbeing@northyorks.gov.uk  or write to the address above. An easy read version of the survey is available on request.

Find out more about accessing this information in another language.

Or email EmotionalHealth.AndWellbeing@northyorks.gov.uk or call our customer service centre on 01609 780780.

You can also send your views on the proposals by email to EmotionalHealth.AndWellbeing@northyorks.gov.uk

Or write to us at:

Healthy Child Section 75 Consultation
Central Admin Team
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
North Yorkshire
DL7 8AE

You can read our privacy notice for this consultation here.

References

Frequently asked questions

How long is the consultation?

This is a 60 day consultation beginning on 10th September 21 and ending at midnight 8th November 2021. We will not be able to consider feedback after this date.

What is this consultation about?

This consultation is about us entering into a Section 75 Partnership Agreement with NHS North Yorkshire CCG to deliver a Targeted and School Based Emotional Wellbeing Service for young people in North Yorkshire.

Why do we need to put formal agreements in place?

Local Authorities and CCGs operate under different legislation, so there is specific statutory provision that is designed to enable joint working between the two parties. Section 75 of the National Health Service Act 2006 states that Local Authorities and NHS bodies (including CCGs) can enter into partnership arrangements to provide a more streamlined service and to pool resources, if such arrangements are likely to lead to an improvement in the way their functions are exercised. The NHS and Local Authorities Partnership Arrangements Regulations 2000 stipulate that partners entering into any partnership agreements [under Section 75 (s75) of the NHS Act 2006] must consult with the public before putting this arrangement in place.

We are committed to the provision of high quality prevention and early intervention services addressing childrens’ emotional wellbeing. The arrangement aims to provide joined up provision that is easy to access and is well-co-ordinated to meet local need. The Partnership Agreement (referred to as “Section 75 Partnership Agreement”) provides us with a mechanism to formalise arrangements to support improved flexibility and greater efficiency, better integration and, in turn, improve outcomes for children, young people and families.

What difference will the partnership agreement make to people who use services?

The agreement will better enable both partners to continue to work together to improve the planning and delivery of childrens’ emotional wellbeing services.

How will you consult with stakeholders and when?

The consultation will start on 10th September 2021 and conclude on 8 November 2021. Every effort will be made to ensure stakeholders have the opportunity to find out about the proposal and give feedback. We are making contact with known networks and those who represent stakeholders to provide relevant information and offer a full briefing if required. The consultation is for 60 days and we hope this will give stakeholders the opportunity to comment.

How will this partnership agreement improve services for people who use them?

It is proposed the length of partnership agreement will be 5 years allowing us to take a more flexible, local and tailored approach to delivering services and be more responsive to the needs of service users. It will allow flexible change and continuous review and help transform the service using the resources available.

Will this consultation or proposed agreement affect service delivery models?

We are already working together to improve how services for children, young people and families are provided and we will continue to engage with stakeholders to inform this work. The proposal is to use the agreement to deliver a Targeted and School Based Emotional Wellbeing Service.

How will any formal agreement be monitored?

We already have regular meetings in place as part of the Mental Health and Learning Disability Partnership. This provides the opportunity to review how the services are performing and identify opportunities to work more effectively across the system. One of the benefits of developing this partnership agreement is the flexibility this presents in terms of acting on further opportunities for improved delivery, efficiency and outcomes for children, young people and families.  Both organisations propose to implement regular review points for the partnership.

What happens after the consultation closes?

Consultation responses and feedback will be collated and reviewed by us and NHS North Yorkshire CCG at the end of the consultation period. A summary report showing the themes and issues raised will be published on this page.

This will be reviewed by the County Council Executive before they reach a decision. Responses from individuals will be anonymised.

A summary of the consultation responses and next steps will be available to view on this page and on the NYCCG website. The Section 75 Agreement would be in place, subject to the outcome of the consultation from 1 April 2022.

Please contact us using one of the methods outlined above to request details as hard copies.

What are the next steps?

Consultation responses and feedback will be collated and reviewed by us and NHS North Yorkshire CCG at the end of the consultation period. A summary report showing the themes and issues raised will be published on this page. The Section 75 Agreement would be in place, subject to the outcome of the consultation from 1 April 2022.

This consultation closed on  1 October 2021.


This consultation is discussing the proposal to lower the age range at Barrowcliff Community Primary School.

1.0 Purpose of the report

1.1 To report the outcome of informal consultation carried out by the Governors of Barrowcliff Community Primary School.

1.2 To seek approval for the publication of proposals and statutory notices to lower the age range of Barrowcliff Community Primary School.

1.3 To ask the Executive (or the Executive Member for Education and Skills if there are no objections during the representation period) to schedule taking a final decision on the proposal at their meeting on 23 November 2021.

2.0 Executive summary

2.1 The Governing Body of Barrowcliff CP School has asked the Local Authority to propose lowering of the age range of their school from 3-11 to 2-11 in order to offer education for 2 year old children. 

2.2 This report is supported by a number of appendices as listed below:

Appendix 1: Consultation document
Appendix 2: Consultation Responses 
Appendix 3: Statutory Proposal
Appendix 4: Draft Statutory Notice
Appendix 5: Equality Impact Assessment

3.0 Background

3.1 Eligible two-year-old children are entitled to up to 15 hours per week for 38 weeks per year of government-funded Early Years education and care from the term following their second birthday until the term following their third birthday. The government funded entitlement may be taken in a maintained school nursery and/or in an Ofsted registered private and voluntary sector provision. The funding may be split between more than one provider. It is parental choice as to which type of provision is the most appropriate for their child and which meets their individual circumstances.

4.0 The proposal

4.1 Barrowcliff School is proposing to provide places for two-year-old children as an extension of the current nursery class provision in the school, by the creation of an additional ‘Early Years’ class. The Early Years Class would have a qualified Early Years teacher and suitably qualified and experienced teaching assistant(s) who will provide a high-quality learning environment to support each child’s learning and development appropriate to their age and stage of development. It will be in line with the Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) with at least one member of staff for every four children who are aged two.

4.2 There will be high quality play-based provision for the two-year-old children in the new class which meet the requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) including role play, sand, water, construction, access to books and reading, mark making and opportunities for outdoor learning. The room will be equipped with suitable furniture, equipment and resources which will support two-year-old children’s learning and development. There will be free flow between areas, including outside, offering children a choice of activities and allowing them to engage in learning which is relevant and appropriate to their stage of development. They will be supported by knowledgeable and appropriately trained adults who are in tune with each individual child’s needs. The Early Years class will be situated in a suite of rooms adjoining the school office and reception area and the outdoor spaces directly outside the rooms. Children will also have access to the existing Nursery outdoor area.

4.2 Barrowcliff School is proposing that the new ‘early years’ class will provide up to 12 places per morning or afternoon session for two year old children.

4.3 Priority for admission of nursery-aged children will be determined by the County Council’s Admissions Policy for Nurseries.  This is separate from admissions to the school, which are determined by the County Council’s policy for Community and Voluntary Controlled Schools. Attendance in Nursery does not provide priority for admission to the Reception year.

4.4 The School Leadership report that they have had many enquiries over the last few years from parents asking if they have places for 2-year-olds in the current Nursery. Although none of these parents responded to the consultation, since it was published, they have had many conversations with current parents, who have younger children, and they have expressed a keen interest to have their children attend our Nursery when they are 2 years old. They say they have been very happy with the provision the school offers for 3-year-olds, and they feel that their younger children would benefit from being in the school’s Nursery from an earlier age.

4.5 From an educational point of view, there has been a significant decline in the number of children reaching age-typical milestones in Barrowcliff’s Nursery baseline assessments. This has been across all curriculum areas, but especially within Communication & Language. The school leadership feel that having the children in Nursery from the age of two will enable them to narrow the attainment gap, as the majority of children who attend their Nursery from the age of 3 years make better than typical progress and this continues into Reception. They believe they will also be able to engage outside agency support sooner for those children with significant additional needs.

5.0 Issues to consider

5.1 The effect the proposals would have on existing providers must be considered. Local pre-school providers within a 2 mile radius have been consulted and given the opportunity to make their views known on the proposal. 

6.0 Consultation undertaken and analysis of responses

6.1 From Friday 14 May to Friday 18 June the Governing Body of Barrowcliff Community Primary School consulted the local community on their proposal. The consultation document, which is appended to this report (as Appendix 1), was sent out to parents, local stakeholders, and other Early Years providers.

6.2 6 responses to the consultation have been received (Appendix 2).

6.3 All 6 responses supported the proposal. These were made up of 4 responses from Staff, 1 from a Parish Council and 1 from the Headteacher of a neighbouring school.

6.4 Barrowcliff Governing Board met (virtually) on 21 June reviewed the consultation responses (Appendix 2) and confirmed that they wish to ask the LA to continue with the statutory proposal.

7.0 Financial implications

7.1 School revenue funding

The school is currently projecting a surplus of £4.8k in 2021/22. £33.9k is also projected for 2022/23, £17.5k in 2023/24. The Governing Body and the Headteacher have modelled the potential income and costs of running nursery-aged provision and feel that this is financially viable. 

7.2 Capital Implications

The school has worked with Local Authority Officers from the Early Years Team and Health and Safety Team to identify a suitable space within their existing buildings. This will be funded from their existing Devolved Capital budget.

7.3 Transport costs

There are no transport costs related to this proposal.

8.0 Legal implications

8.1 The School Organisation (Prescribed Alterations to Maintained Schools) (England) Regulations 2013 set out the manner in which prescribed alterations could be made to maintained schools. The statutory guidance ‘Making Prescribed Alterations to Maintained Schools’ was updated in October 2018. Careful attention has been paid to this guidance throughout the process.

9.0 Human rights implications

9.1 There are no Human Rights issues in relation to this decision.

10.0 Other implications

10.1 An Equality Impact Assessment has been undertaken in respect of this change and is attached at Appendix 5. The County Council’s Officers feel that this decision is in the best interests of children and families served by the school to ensure quality early years education provision is provided in the area.

11.0 Conclusion

11.1 The consultation process has revealed support for the proposal. The Governing Body considered the consultation responses on 21 June and voted in favour of proceeding to seek the approval of the Executive to publish statutory notices.

12.0 Next steps

12.1 It is proposed to publish proposals and statutory notices on 1 October 2021. The proposals would be published on the County Council’s website and the statutory notice would be published in a local newspaper and displayed at the main entrance to the school. This would provide four weeks for any further representations to be made to the Local Authority by 29 October.

12.2 The Executive agreed a model for decision making on school organisation proposals on 25 September 2007. If approval is given to publish statutory proposals and notices, it is proposed that a final decision is taken by the Executive on 23 November 2021 (or by the Executive Member for Education and Skills if there are no objections during the representation period).

12.3 The key dates are shown below:

Consultation 14 May – 18 June 2021
Governing Body consider consultation responses and vote to proceed 21 June 2021
County Council’s Executive decision to publish statutory notices 21 September 2021
Statutory notices published  1 October 2021
Representation period (4 weeks) 1 October – 29 October 2021

Final decision by County Council’s Executive

(or by the Executive Member for Education and Skills if there are no objections during the representation period)

23 November 2021
Implementation 1 January 2022

13.0 Recommendations

13.1 That proposals and statutory notices be published on 1 October to lower the school age range of Barrowcliff Community Primary School from 1 January 2022.

13.2 That the Executive schedule taking a final decision on these proposals on 23 November 2021.

Stuart Carlton
Corporate Director – Children and Young People’s Service
Report prepared by Matt George – Strategic Planning Officer

This consultation closed on 4 October.


See information about proposals for the future of Sexual Health Services in North Yorkshire and have your say on them.

Background

North Yorkshire covers 3,000 square miles ranging from isolated rural settlements and farms to market towns and larger urban conurbations such as Harrogate and Scarborough. Whilst North Yorkshire is in overall terms more affluent than a typical local authority in England, there are nevertheless areas of profound deprivation, including some parts of the County ranked within the 20% most deprived areas in England.

Sexual and reproductive health is not just about preventing disease or infection. It also means promoting good sexual health in a wider context, including relationships, sexuality and sexual rights. 

Most adults are sexually active and good sexual health matters to individuals and communities. Sexual health needs vary according to factors such as age, gender, sexual orientation and ethnicity. However, there are certain core needs common to everyone, including high-quality information and education enabling people to make informed decisions, and access to high-quality services, treatment and interventions. However, poor sexual health outcomes fall disproportionately on certain groups. Sexual health is therefore an important component of public health.

The impact of STI's remains greatest in:

  • young heterosexuals ages 15 to 24 years
  • black minority ethnic population
  • gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM)
  • people in the most deprived deciles

Young people experience the highest diagnosis rate of the most common STI's

Since 1 April 2013, local authorities have been mandated to ensure that comprehensive, open access, confidential sexual health services are available to all people who are present in their area (whether resident in that area or not). The requirement for Genito-Urinary Medicine (GUM) and Contraception and Sexual Health (CaSH) services to be provided on an open access basis is stipulated in the Local Authorities (Public Health Functions and Entry to Premises by Local Healthwatch Representatives) Regulations 2013.

We recognise that the specialist sexual health service operates as part of a wider sexual health system across North Yorkshire; including Primary Care, NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups and NHS England. This service will not work in isolation from the wider range of services and workforces, but services commissioned by other organisations such as the NHS England are out of scope from this consultation.

North Yorkshire ranks 26th out of 149 Local Authorities across England for sexual and reproductive health outcomes. In comparison to our 16 nearest comparator councils (Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA)) North Yorkshire ranks 2nd for sexual and reproductive health outcomes.

Sexual and reproductive health summary rank (2017/18)

  • Best: Devon - 1
  • North Yorkshire - 2
  • Worst: Staffordshire - 16

(PHE Fingertips).

The existing service, for the last seven years (branded YorSexualHealth) delivered by York and Scarborough Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation has a proven record of accomplishment and is a well-regarded specialist sexual health service across North Yorkshire. The service delivers high quality, free, confidential and friendly sexual health provision across the county accessed via face-to-face clinics, online and telephone.

As COVID-19 continues and infection rates remain high we want to ensure that everyone who needs contraception, and other types of sexual and reproductive healthcare, stays informed about changes to services and that they can continue to access services  when they are needed.

North Yorkshire County Council in partnership with York and Scarborough Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, is proposing to change some aspects of the sexual health service. In a national and local context of reducing Public Health budgets, as well as the learning from COVID-19, we need to ensure that the service is affordable, continues to provide value for money and evolves to meet the needs of our residents.

We want to hear your views about these proposed changes and how best to implement them.

The new partnership agreement between North Yorkshire County Council and York and Scarborough Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is due to commence on 1 April 2022 for a further 4 year period.

We previously consulted on North Yorkshire County Council and York and Scarborough Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust entering into a partnership agreement (known as a S75 Agreement) under section 75 of the National Health Service Act 2006. The Parties intended for the partnership arrangements to commence 1 April 2020 however due to Covid 19 this has been delayed. The partners are consulting on a potential change to sexual health services (this consultation). The partners intend to consult later in the year on the final proposals for the partnership arrangement including content of the S75 Agreement between the partners.

Proposal summary

We (the council and York and Scarborough Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust) propose to maintain open access (this means that everyone irrespective of age or location or residence or GP registration can access the service directly without referral) to sexual health services with an enhanced targeted approach to those who need it most.  

Under the new proposals, the service will further develop its online offer with more services available remotely; the service will continue face-to-face clinics with a reduction or removal of some community clinics, based on need and footfall. The service will continue to offer the full range of contraception; however, those over 19 years old will be required to access routine repeat contraception from their GP unless emergency contraception is issued. An improved training offer with blended options including interactive webinars, e learning and face-to-face will be available for frontline professionals. Finally, the service will further integrate the counselling and HIV services and the clinical and community development teams to provide a holistic offer to those in greatest need.

The current sexual health service works well and we want to continue what works, within the funding available and to work together with one of our leading, local NHS organisations, to invest in services for the future.

We want to learn from the emergency changes made to the current service during the response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

In putting these proposals forward, we are making clear pledges to you.

Our commitments

  • We will ensure the service prioritises prevention and early intervention with a focus on young people and most at risk populations.
  • We will ensure a skilled and competent sexual health workforce (providing person centred care) delivers the service.
  • We will ensure strong clinical leadership within the service that works closely with partners across the local sexual health system.
  • We will ensure the service complies with evidence-based practice, but also applies innovative practice, which is evaluated. 
  • We will ensure there is rapid and easy access to the Service including in rural areas, delivering services in accessible and appropriate settings.
  • We will ensure all contraceptive, Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) diagnosis and treatment provided is delivered in one location as far as is practicably possible.
  • We will ensure available resources are focussed on delivering the best possible sexual health outcomes for all people in North Yorkshire. We will keep investment in North Yorkshire, ensuring that people get the service they need within the county.

What is a Sexual Health Service?

An integrated sexual health service provides people of all ages, open access, confidential, non-judgemental services including sexually transmitted infections (STI’s) and Blood Borne Viruses (BBV) testing, treatment and management; the full range of contraception provision; health promotion and prevention.

The service currently comprises of the following key elements:

Sexual health promotion and information

Provide evidence based sexual health information including but not limited to information on: pregnancy and abortion, full range of contraception, STI’s and safe sex messages, sexual assault, child sexual exploitation (CSE) and female genital mutilation (FGM).

Contraceptive services

Provide full range of contraceptives including pregnancy testing and counselling about pregnancy choices, supply of condoms, emergency contraception, first prescription and  continuing supply of all contraceptive methods (excluding gynaecological reasons), all follow up appointments, advice about family planning, advice and support experiencing difficulties with choice of contraceptive methods, management of complex contraceptive problems.

STI services

Provide STI services following assessment of need and risk. Tests for Chlamydia, Gonorrhoea, Syphilis and HIV. Hepatitis A and B immunisations. Diagnostics processed and results conveyed quickly and acted upon appropriately. Management of complex and non-complex STIs. Partner notification. Post exposure prophylaxis (PEP, PEPSE) and Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) provision.

Clinical outreach service (under 25’s and those of greatest need)

Clinical outreach provision to those most in need and complex, advice, information, contraception, STI/HIV testing and treatment.

Sexual health counselling

Six 1-hour sessions for people living in North Yorkshire who wish to seek support around different aspects of sex or sexual health.

Community outreach service (targeted most at risk groups)

Community development approaches providing sexual health promotion and prevention to high-risk groups, improve access to HIV/STI diagnostic and treatment interventions. 

Positive support service for people living with HIV and their carers

Support for people living with HIV, self-management, prevention of onward transmission, improve quality of life and independence.

Training

Coordinate and deliver an annual sexual health training programme, tailored to meet the needs of a range of frontline professional staff.

Why are we proposing to make changes to the service?

  1. The national Public Health Grant has reduced and is reducing further.

    The Central Government grant funding has reduced, this means that North Yorkshire will have less money for the Local Authority to spend on its local public health services, which includes sexual health services.

  1. We have learnt from how we have had to respond to COVID-19.

    The pandemic has changed how we deliver the current service for the long-term. The profound impact of the virus on society and on public services means that people have been using services differently and staff have developed new roles and skills. As national lockdown is easing, the current service is recovering but it will never return to the pre-pandemic status. This consultation is proposing to implement the learning from our COVID-19 response.

  1. Seven years have passed since the Integrated Sexual Health Service first launched.

    Although the service has adapted and changed to meet individual and communities needs over the last seven years, it offers an opportunity to review the full service with all the different elements of provision and continue to make improvements.

What difference will the proposed changes make to the current service?

The sexual health service will continue to provide an all age, open access, free confidential service across the county.

However, the proposal is that the service will further develop its current on-line offer with more services available remotely (dependant on risk). These will include:

  • An on-line booking system where individuals will be able to book their appointments, create their own confidential individual record where they can track test results and next steps if treatment is required.
  • A telephone triage system will continue to operate via highly skilled clinical staff, which will ensure that people reach the right place at the right time. A mobile number for young people will continue to operate for access into the service in a discrete and confidential manner.
  • The website will be developed to include more information and advice on self-care. Individuals will be able to self-refer for counselling, access clinical triage and order appropriate STI tests.
  • In terms of ordering appropriate on-line STI tests in the new service, STI tests will be personalised specifically to individual risk taking and sexual health history (i.e. HIV & Syphilis).  All tests will only be made available to individuals once every 3 months, unless there is a demonstrated risk. These changes will mean people get the right test for their individual history and risks taken.

There will continue to be an offer of face-to-face clinics across a range of locations five days a week for those who need it. There will be a reduction or removal of some community clinics as the enhanced online and virtual provision takes effect. However, as a minimum the four main hubs across North Yorkshire will remain, these are Harrogate, Northallerton, Scarborough and Selby.

Decisions on which community clinics will continue will be made using the latest available data and demand to ensure service offer reflects the needs of the local population. As a minimum, clinics will remain in Skipton and Catterick Garrison, additional community clinics will continue to evolve and flex over the life of the partnership.

The full range of contraception will remain in place, however if individuals are over 19 years old under the proposed changes, they will no longer be able to access repeat basic contraception (pills, patches, rings) and will be directed to their GP for continuation. One exception to these changes would be if an individual has received emergency contraception within the last 14 days. In this instance, they would still be supported to identify the most appropriate method of contraception for themselves and provided with 3 months’ supply of the chosen method of contraception. The service would then contact the individual’s GP to ensure follow-up, providing a full rationale for the contraceptive choice. Further prescribing would then supplied by the GP. The service will work closely with General Practice and residents to ensure seamless continuity of care.

Under the new proposals front-line professionals within the wider sexual health system, would see an improved training offer. This will include a range of blended training options including interactive webinars, e learning and condensed face-to-face training for clinicians who wish to complete the COIL fitting and removal competencies. This will reduce travel and staff time across the county for training and should increase the uptake of the training on offer.

The service will continue to deliver a counselling and HIV support service. Under the proposed changes, the counselling and HIV services will further integrate to enable a more coordinated approach between professionals to improve the pathways of care for individuals and their carers accessing those services. This multi-disciplinary team will help people manage and reduce risks, ensure access to the full range of integrated sexual and contraceptive health services, support for physical and mental health and wellbeing and structured interventions and support to people living with HIV and their carers.

The service will continue to deliver a clinical and community development offer for high-risk groups. In the new service, practitioners from different disciplines (nurses and community development workers) will work more closely together and use innovative practice to improve reach for those in high-risk groups.  These include for example, drug and alcohol users, sex workers, BAME, LGBTQ+ and homeless communities.

What does our Equality Impact Assessment say?

We have carried out an equality impact assessment (EIA) available here.

Equality impact assessments ensure that our policies, services and legislation do not discriminate against anyone and that we promote equality of opportunity.

We will update the EIA following comments received during the consultation and our Executive and the York and Scarborough Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Board will consider it again before a final decision on implementing the re-configured service.

The EIA has identified at this stage that there will not be an impact on individual’s sexual health.

We anticipate that, if the proposals are implemented, the service will have a positive impact on sexual and reproductive health outcomes, with a more responsive service for all. However we will continue to monitor and review the data to address early any adverse impacts.

Take part and tell us your views.

We want to hear your views on the proposals and, in particular on the following questions:

  1. We have learned from how we had to adapt during the Covid-19 pandemic, and in future, we want to further the online and telephone remote offer as part of the sexual health service. Do you support a more enhanced online and telephone service to complement face-to-face delivery?
  2. Do you support a more personalised offer to sexually transmitted infections (STI) testing across North Yorkshire based on an individual’s level risk and history?
  3. Free contraception and advice will continue to be available from the sexual health service. The sexual health service will be able to start an individual on a new contraception method where appropriate; however, people aged over 19 years old will not be offered basic repeat prescriptions. Instead, individuals will be signposted to their GP. What do you feel we need to consider as part of this change?
  4. Do you support a more coordinated approach between the sexual health counselling and HIV support services?
  5. Do you support a more responsive joined up clinical and community approach to engaging with those with greater levels of risk or need in relation to sexual and reproductive health?
  6. Finally, what are the most important issues for you and your sexual and reproductive health?  

You can tell us your views and give us your suggestions in the following ways:

Fill in the online survey.

Please do not include any personal identifiable information in any of your answers that could identify yourself or another individual.

An easy read version of this survey is available on request.

If you would like to request any paper copies of the survey, or require information about the consultation in a different language or a more accessible format please contact nypublichealth@northyorks.gov.uk

Or call our customer service centre on 01609 780780.

You can also send your views on the proposals by email to nypublichealth@northyorks.gov.uk

Or write to us at:

Sexual Health Service Consultation
Central Admin Team
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
North Yorkshire
DL7 8AE

How long is the consultation?

This will be a 60-day consultation starting on 4 August 2021 and ending on 4 October 2021.

The consultation and related feedback will enable formal agreements to be in place by 1 April 2022.

What happens after the consultation closes?

The responses received during this public consultation will be considered by North Yorkshire County Council’s Executive, and by York and Scarborough Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Board, before any final decision is made.

Subject to the outcome of this consultation and due consideration, it is proposed that the new service will begin on 1 April 2022.

This consultation closed on 15 May 2021


North Yorkshire County Council Determination of school admission arrangements for the 2022-2023 school year.

Notice is hereby given that North Yorkshire County Council, being the admission authority for all community and voluntary controlled primary, infant, junior and secondary schools in its area, have determined the admission arrangements for the 2022/2023 school year for admission into:

  1. The Reception Year at all primary and infant schools
  2. Year 3 in all junior schools
  3. Year 7 in all secondary schools
  4. Year 12 in secondary schools with post-16 provision

The admission arrangements for other schools which are not community or voluntary controlled schools are determined by their respective governing bodies or academy trusts. Copies of the determined admission arrangements for these Schools and Academies are available from the individual schools.

Determination of the admission arrangements at schools maintained by the Authority were made following consultation, as set out in The School Admissions Code and relevant legislation.  Copies of the determined admission arrangements are available for inspection at:

Children and Young Peoples Services, County Hall, Northallerton, North Yorkshire, DL7 8AD and also on the Council’s website admission, statistics and policies page.

Any person or body can object to the admission arrangements, where they provide their name and address, by writing to the school adjudicator, except where:

  1. the objection seeks, in substance, an alteration to admission arrangements for a grammar school;
  2. the objection seeks, in substance, to remove selection from a selective Academy;
  3. the objection relates to a non-increase in admission number for a school for which the local authority is not the admissions authority;
  4. the objection relates to a non-increase in admission number for a community or voluntary controlled school, except where the objection is by the governing body of that school
  5. the objection relates to an existing agreement for the admissions arrangements of an Academy to vary from the School Admissions Code
  6. the adjudicator has, within the last 2 years, made a decision to an objection to the admission arrangements of a school or Academy, and where any new objection referred to the adjudicator raises the same or substantially the same issues in relation to those admission arrangements.

All objections must be received by the adjudicator on or before 15 May 2021, at:

The Office of the Schools Adjudicator

Mowden Hall, Staindrop Road, Darlington, DL3 9BG

OSA.TEAM@osa.gsi.gov.uk

Tel: 0870 0012468 Fax: 01325 391313

Signed:   Stuart Carlton

Corporate Director, Children and Young Peoples Service

Dated: 17 February 2021

This consultation closed on 30th April 2021


Background

There are several transport issues in and around Malton and Norton which previous studies, such as the Malton & Norton Infrastructure and Connectivity Improvements Study, have examined. One of the key outputs of this study was the Internal Junction and Traffic Signal Study, which forms the focus of current work. The Internal Junction and Traffic Signal Study looked in more detail at different options to improve traffic, queuing and congestion, and modelled the impact on the transport network. Information on the process followed, and how a suitable potential scheme has been identified, are below. It is important to note that the scheme has not been finalised. Your feedback will help inform further work and development.

How have we developed options?

The Internal Junction and Traffic Signal Study looked in more detail at potential options and modelling the impact of these options on the transport network.

Two areas were identified where there was an opportunity to improve traffic, queueing and congestion; Butcher Corner and the area around the level crossing (Castlegate, Church Street, Welham Road, Norton Road).

These junctions were selected as they are key locations on the road network, where several routes all come together to connect into the centre of the two towns.

Butcher Corner already has traffic lights and pedestrian facilities, but improvements can be made to the operation of the traffic lights.

The level crossing area currently operates with priority given to Castlegate and Welham Road – Church Street and Norton Road have to give way. Improvements can be made to managing priority, and facilities for pedestrians and cyclists.

Improvements to the Welham Road / Church Street / Norton Road / Castlegate junction near the level crossing

  • A range of junction layouts and options were tested. The options considered included reversion of priority from the existing layout, a mini-roundabout and different traffic signal options. These options did not provide clear benefits over the current layout, and had some negative impacts e.g. road safety.
  • Traffic signals at the junction (based on the existing junction layout) were also looked at, but this did not provide sufficient benefits, and could cause more delays.
  • Further options which were looked at and discounted for the junction included; restricting/banning individual movements and one-way systems.

Improvements at Butcher Corner and One Way / Gyratory Systems to help the overall transport network

  • Traffic signal changes were looked at for Butcher Corner as there is limited space for more significant changes.
  • The option of removing approaches to the junction, and making them one way, was tested to make sure that journeys could still be accommodated with different routes. It was found that the proposed changes, including one-way gyratory systems across both towns, would make congestion worse.
  • Other options considered included a technology-based solution to make the junction more efficient, and a right turn green arrow (traffic signal) to improve traffic flow and increase ‘green light time’ for vehicles turning right from Castlegate to Old Maltongate.

All the options were scored against costs, how deliverable they were, and the benefits and disadvantages for different road users. We used the outputs from the Internal Junctions and Traffic Signal Study to develop the current scheme.

What is the proposed scheme?

Following analysis of modelling and design work to date, it was found that the proposed options as part of the Internal Junctions and Traffic Signal Study could not fully relieve the impact of congestion in Malton and Norton.

However, from in depth modelling, it was found that a combination of some options together would allow for better management of traffic, queueing and congestion, which would reduce delays. These proposed options are:

1) Technology changes to Butcher Corner Junction

  • New ‘right turn green arrow’ for traffic coming from Castlegate.
  • Upgrade of technology to better control traffic lights and manage traffic flow.

A map showing changes near the level crossing. Contact us for this information in a different format.

Download a bigger version of the  level crossing improvement plan (pdf / 311 KB).

2) Traffic signal control at Welham Rd / Church St / Norton Rd / Castlegate junction linking with rail level crossing

  • Traffic signal control added to the junction (this will be supplemented with changes to road layout at Church Street/Norton Road).
  • New pedestrian crossings across Welham Road and Norton Road.
  • Reconfiguring Church Street junction to single lane.

3) Infrastructure Changes at the Welham Rd / Church St / Norton Rd / Castlegate junction

  • Norton Road to be one-way westbound to reduce traffic movements onto the level crossing.
  • One-way system on Norton Road will free up road space to accommodate a new footpath/cycleway towards the train station.

Map showing technology changes to Butchers Corner junction. Contact us for this information in a different format.

Download a bigger version of the  Butchers Croner improvements plan. (pdf / 341 KB)

What are the scheme benefits?

  • Bring benefits to drivers, pedestrians and cyclists, in addition to better management of the overall transport network.
  • Better manage queues at the Welham Road / Church Street junction, and reduce the number of vehicles using routes, such as St. Nicholas Street, to ‘jump the queue’.
  • Benefits for pedestrians and cyclists with new signalised crossings at the level crossing junction, and new footway/cycleway on Norton Road. This will provide a safe route between Norton and Malton train station.
  • Advance stop lines for cyclists at the level crossing junction will allow cyclists to safely join the front of the queue.
  • More efficient management of traffic at Butcher Corner, benefitting all road users.
  • Better management of the road network in Malton and Norton, even with the planned increase in level crossing closures.

What are the scheme impacts?

  • There is an AQMA (Air Quality Management Area) at Castlegate meaning that the impact of the proposed scheme on air quality had to be tested.
  • Analysis showed that the proposed scheme is expected to have an impact on air quality within the AQMA at Castlegate.
  • The scheme will have an impact on bus routing, as buses will be diverted back towards Malton, before travelling along Wells Lane and south-bound along Castlegate.

Norton Road One-Way System

  • As a first step, we intend to trial the one-way system on Norton Road.
  • The one way system will be trialled for an initial three month period, before progressing with the rest of the proposed scheme.
  • This will be a temporary change to allow for detailed air quality measurements to be taken to assess the impact of the re-routed traffic on air quality.
  • The main aim of the trial is to better inform development, and further consideration, of the proposed scheme.

Have your say

Residents in Malton and Norton are invited to give their comments by completing our quick and easy online survey.

Have your say.

Remember to take part before the survey closes on Friday 30th April 2021.

To request a paper copy of the survey, or if you require any further information, please email with your contact information and details of your enquiry to ltp@northyorks.gov.uk.

Your data security is important

For more information on how and why we process your personal data, please see the Malton and Norton improvement scheme privacy notice.

This consultation closed on 27 May 2021.


Danby Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School Governing Body To change category from a voluntary controlled school to a voluntary aided school.

Notice is given in accordance with section 19(3) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that Danby Church of England Voluntary Controlled School  Governing Body intends to make a prescribed alteration to Danby Church of England Voluntary Controlled School, Ainthorpe Lane, Danby, Whitby, North Yorkshire YO21 2NG from 16 September 2021.

To change category from a voluntary controlled school to a voluntary aided school.

No new or additional site is required for these proposals.

The governing body will implement the proposal

This Notice is an extract of the complete proposal. Copies of the complete proposal can be obtained from: Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE and the complete proposals are available on our website and on the Danby Primary School website.

Within four weeks from the date of publication of this proposal, any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by sending them to Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton,

DL7 8AE or by email to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk  by 5pm on 27 May 2021.

Signed: Chair of Governors, Danby CE VC Primary School

Publication Date: 29 April 2021

Have your say on advocacy services in North Yorkshire.

We would like to talk to people who are interested in advocacy services in North Yorkshire. This particularly includes people who have used these services and any health and social care staff who have experience of working with advocacy services.

We would like to understand people’s experiences with advocacy services, what they think about current services in North Yorkshire, and what people would like future services to look like.

Background

The contract for the existing adults’ advocacy service will end on 31 March 2022. The Service Development Team in Health and Adult Services is leading on the review of the current service and the development of a new service. This will start on 1st April 2022.

While a lot of what the service does is determined by national legislation, we want to involve people who have been supported by or worked with advocacy services in designing the new service as much as possible.

We are therefore inviting anyone with an interest in advocacy services to speak to us about their views and experiences. The engagement will run until Monday 16 August.

What is advocacy?

Advocacy is when someone supports you to speak up, or speaks up on your behalf, to ensure you are involved in decisions made about you. Some people have a legal right to an advocate.

Find further information about advocacy and the support available in North Yorkshire. You can also call us on 01609 780780.

Further information on the different types of advocacy and what the current service does is available below.

What is changing?

The current contract for an independent advocacy service for adults in North Yorkshire is ending on 31 March 2022. This is a statutory service, meaning that the council has to make sure a new service is in place from 1 April 2022.

There are no plans to fundamentally change what the service does. We are reviewing the service and talking to people to make sure that the new service reflects what is important to people when they are being supported by an advocate, and that they can access the support they need in the way which best suits them.

We are also waiting for more information about Liberty Protection Safeguards and the Mental Health Act review. The Liberty Protection Safeguards will replace the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards, and are due to come into force from April 2022.

We will make sure the new service includes any changes brought in by the Liberty Protection Safeguards and the government’s review into the Mental Health Act.

How people can get involved

There are several different ways people can tell us what they think. These include:

  • Completing a short online survey about advocacy. Please contact the team using the details below to request any alternative formats.
  • Arranging a phone or video call with a member of the Service Development team.
  • If you work in Health and Social Care, arranging for someone from Service Development to attend an upcoming meeting to discuss the engagement and advocacy services

If you would like to speak to someone about any of the above options, please email us at HASservicedevelopment@northyorks.gov.uk or call us on 01609 780780. You can also submit feedback via the Service Development email address.

What does the current service do?

The current adults’ advocacy service is provided by Cloverleaf Advocacy. They provide several different types of advocacy which are explained in the table below.

Type of advocacy

What it means

Care Act Advocacy

The Council needs to involve people in decisions about their care and support needs. This means that if someone has substantial difficulty being involved in a social care process such as an assessment, review of their care and support or a safeguarding process, the Council must provide an advocate if they do not have someone else who can help them.

Non-Statutory Advocacy

People are eligible for non-statutory advocacy in North Yorkshire if they have substantial difficulty being involved in a social care process which is not related to those covered by the Care Act processes.

For example, this could be about access to services, housing or a complaint.

Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy

The Council and NHS organisations must refer someone for an Independent Mental Capacity Advocate if they do not have capacity to make specific decisions and there is no-one who can be consulted about those decisions on their behalf.

This could be about serious medical treatment, a review of their care or where they live.

Independent Mental Health Advocacy

Independent Mental Health Advocates are specially trained to support people with decisions about mental health care and treatment. Hospital and medical staff must make sure that people know about their right to an advocate and make a referral if someone wants or needs an Independent Mental Health Advocate.

Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) Relevant Persons Representative (RPR)

If someone’s care is authorised following a Deprivation of Liberty assessment, a representative must be appointed to make sure that the rights of the person being deprived of their liberty are protected.

This can be a friend or family member and is known as a Relevant Person’s Representative (RPR). Anyone who is deprived of their liberty must have an RPR, so if the person’s friends and family cannot do this then an RPR from Cloverleaf is appointed.

In addition to the adults’ advocacy service delivered by Cloverleaf, there are other advocacy services covering North Yorkshire which also come to an end in March next year.

These include the children and young people’s advocacy service delivered by National Youth Advocacy Service and the NHS complaints service delivered by Cloverleaf Advocacy.

This engagement is only looking at the adults’ independent advocacy service. If you would like to submit feedback about the children’s, please email rachel.miller@northyorks.gov.uk ,or to submit feedback about NHS complaints services, please email daniel.harry@northyorks.gov.uk

What happens next?

We are talking to people about advocacy from June until the end of July. We will then make sure we have read through and recorded everything people have told us.

We will be writing a new service specification in August, and we will use what people have said to make sure the new service reflects what is important to people, how they want to be supported and how they want to access that support.

A summary of the feedback we receive will be published on this webpage. If you would like to be notified when this is available or request a copy in a different format, please contact the Service Development team.

Where can I find more information?

Find further information about advocacy and the support available in North Yorkshire. You can also call us on 01609 780780.

This survey closed on 23 July 2021.


Ourselves, Parent Carer Voice, and local Clinical Commissioning groups are seeking to develop a joint strategy for North Yorkshire that covers education, health and care, for children and young people with Special Educational needs and Disabilities SEND up to the age of 25 years.

In partnership with children, young people, parents, carers and other key stakeholders, we intend to establish a strategic vision for the future in North Yorkshire.

The strategy will reflect the views and experiences of children and young people, and their families, and sets out the course for ongoing and sustained progress.

It will shape how we work together in future to ensure the best outcomes for children and young people with SEND are achieved across the county. The strategy will be developed in collaboration with all of the following key stakeholders:

  • Children and young people with SEND
  • Parents/carers of children and young people with SEND
  • Health commissioners and providers
  • North Yorkshire, Vale of York, Bradford and Craven and Morecombe CCGs
  • Mainstream and specialist education settings
  • Voluntary and community sector organisations
  • Children’s Services and Health and Adult Services – North Yorkshire County Council

The first stage of developing the strategy is to ask for your input – we want to know what you think is going well in North Yorkshire, and what could be better.

Online events

We are holding some online events between 28 June and 15 July where you can share your experiences with us.

The events will be led by an independent body, the Council for Disabled Children (CDC).

Unfortunately, due to Covid-19 restrictions, it is unlikely that we will be able to host face-to-face events at the moment.

Parents and carers

Join parents and carers events.

Area

Date and time

Craven

1st July, 10-11.30am

Hambleton and Richmond

7th July, 10-11.30am

Harrogate

7th July, 7-8.30 pm

Scarborough

12th July, 1-2.30pm

Selby

15th July, 1-2.30pm

All areas

1st July, 7-8.30pm

8th July, 7-8.30pm

 

Professionals

Join professionals events

Area

Date and time

Craven

28th June, 7-8.30pm

Hambleton and Richmond

30th June, 1-2.30pm

Selby

1st July, 1-2.30 pm

All areas

6th July, 7-8.30pm

Harrogate

8th July, 1-2.30pm

All areas

12th July, 7-8.30pm

Scarborough

13th July, 1-2:30pm

Young people

A guided focus group for young people with SEND will be held on Thursday 15 July 2021, 5pm to 6pm on Microsoft Teams, hosted by NY Voice, our Youth Voice and Creative Engagement Team.

Young people can book their places here. Parents and trusted adults can attend and support their children during the group sessions as required.

If you can’t make the event on 15 July, we are more than willing to arrange a further session to accommodate all those who wish to take part.

If you or your young people have any concerns, questions, or would like to discuss any additional support needs to access the groups, please contact Nyvoice@northyorks.gov.uk.

Tell us your views

Online survey

Fill in the online survey..

An easy read version of this survey is available on request – please contact us via one of the methods listed below.

Please sign up for an event and fill in the questionnaire. The questionnaire will be open until 23 July.

Other ways to give us your feedback

If you can’t come to an event, you can give us your feedback in other ways:

Send an email to SEND@northyorks.gov.uk

Call 01609 780780 to speak to our customer services centre

Write to us at:

SEND review
Central Admin Team
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
North Yorkshire
DL7 8AE

You can also ask for a print out of the survey or a different format by emailing SEND@northyorks.gov.uk or calling 01609 780780.

What happens next?

Your feedback will be incorporated into a draft strategy that will be developed collaboratively with representatives from each of the stakeholder groups.

There will be another chance to give your views in Autumn 2021, when there will be a formal consultation on the draft strategy.  We’ll then incorporate feedback from the consultation before producing a final strategy.

This is your opportunity to have your say on your experience of SEND services in North Yorkshire, and be part of shaping the strategy for the local area going forward.

We recently refreshed our equality and diversity policy statement and undertook an online consultation on the draft refreshed document from 7 April to 21 May 2021. We also engaged with staff via staff networks and internal communication platforms, and asked local disability groups for their comments.

In total 95 respondents completed the questionnaire on-line and 1 completed a paper version. A further 6 responses were received via email. Responses were received from:

  • North Yorkshire County Council Employees (88%)
  • Residents of North Yorkshire (6%)
  • Disability representatives (6%)

The survey results were strongly supportive of the proposed policy statement and people were in agreement that the aims (79% agreed) and commitments (81% agreed) were the right ones for North Yorkshire.

Respondents were asked if there was anything else they would like to tell us about our draft equality and diversity policy statement. Responses are grouped into themes below:

Response theme

No received

Need to ensure statement is embedded with staff/managers/councillors and training takes place

9

Clarification of terminology/wording and typos

6

Support for statement

4

Requirement for regular monitoring

4

Need to be clear about equality of opportunity and getting the best person for the job, not positive discrimination

4

Need additional emphasis on race

3

Specific comments about instances when the respondent feels NYCC has not met the standards it should

3

Poor attitude to disabled employees

2

Support for protecting rights of natal women

2

No mention of gender

1

Support networks for LGBT groups

1

Not enough women working part time in senior positions with younger children

1

How does this link to unitarisation?

1

Can we link in lived experience?

1

More resources needed to ensure commitments met

1

Support for ex-military job applicants

1

Equality practices/procedures – school governors

1

Read a full report on the consultation responses and amendments made to the policy statement as a result.

Our refreshed equality, diversity and inclusion policy statement was agreed at Full Council on 21 July 2021.


This consultation closed on 21 May


We are currently reviewing our equality and diversity policy statement and would like to hear your views on our draft outlined below.

Draft equality and diversity policy statement

Our Commitment

We welcome and celebrate diversity and the strengths this brings to our communities and workforce. We have detailed our vision and ambitions for the county and all our communities in our Council Plan.

As one of the largest employers in the county and one of the main providers of local services, We are committed to providing equality of opportunity and tackling discrimination, harassment, intimidation and disadvantage. We are also committed to achieving the highest standards in service delivery, decision-making and employment practice.

Our aims

We aim to:

  • create an inclusive culture with a sense of belonging for everyone
  • support the development of cohesive places where everyone is treated fairly no matter what their background
  • work with partners and local businesses to improve opportunities for the people of North Yorkshire, especially those who experience disadvantage and discrimination
  • be an access friendly organisation for communities and workforce
  • ensure that our recruitment is fair, open and inclusive
  • have a workforce that reflects the diversity of North Yorkshire
  • ensure that diversity and inclusion is a natural and organic part of what we do, making it something that everyone at the council understands
  • increase representation of under-represented groups at all levels across the council
  • build our reputation as an inclusive employer that attracts, develops, supports, retains and fully engages all of our workforce.

Treating everyone the same does not necessarily give people equality of opportunity. Sometimes we need to treat different people in a different way to give them equal access to a service or job.

Our responsibilities

The Equality Act 2010 says that we must not treat people unfairly because of age, disability, sex, gender reassignment, sexual orientation, race, religion or belief, pregnancy or maternity, marriage or civil partnership. These are called “protected characteristics”.

As a local authority we must:

  • stop unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation
  • make sure that people have equality of opportunity whether or not they have a particular protected characteristic
  • build good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who don’t

North Yorkshire is a very rural county and people living outside the larger towns can find it difficult to access services. We will treat people fairly wherever they live and make sure they get the services they need.

There are other factors which affect people’s lives. Examples of these are income, education, unpaid care responsibilities and occupation. We will work to deliver the best possible outcomes for all our communities and citizens.

We will not just focus solely on protected characteristics, but promote inclusion and diversity more generally.

Meeting our responsibilities

Everyone, including the the council, has a part to play to realise our vision for North Yorkshire. We will work with our communities and partners to achieve our vision.

As part of meeting our responsibilities, we make the following commitments:

  • we will treat staff and customers with dignity and respect, and embrace and celebrate diversity
  • we will develop our councillors and staff to help us meet our equality duties and show leadership by being active and visible in delivery of our responsibilities
  • we will use information and talk to people to identify where inequality exists so that we can plan to tackle it
  • when it will help us to improve our services and to understand how we are meeting our equality duties, we will ask questions about people’s protected characteristics, including age, race, sex and disability. We will always make it clear that people do not have to answer these questions and that they will still receive the services they need. We will keep personal data confidential
  • we will consider equality issues when we deliver our services. Our service plans will include any major equality actions that we plan to undertake. We will set at least one equality objective which will help us focus on some of the areas which we want to improve
  • when we think about changing our services we will make sure that those making the decision know how the change could affect people with any of the protected characteristics. We will collect information about how people might be affected before making a decision. If the change might cause difficulties for people with a protected characteristic, we will do our best to find ways to reduce this impact. If we can’t, then we should think carefully about whether we need to make the change to achieve a legitimate aim
  • we have a duty to make reasonable changes to the way we do things so that disabled people can use our services and work for us. We recognise that everyone is different and we will treat people as individuals
  • we will make sure that anyone who provides a service for us treats people fairly. We will do this through our procurement process and by monitoring their work
  • we will consider the needs of all communities in the methods we use for communicating with customers, colleagues and residents
  • we will recruit, select, train and promote staff fairly. We will aim to get the make-up of our staff to match our communities. We will have clear systems for staff to complain if they are treated unfairly
  • we will make it easy for customers to complain if something goes wrong and we will respond quickly and efficiently. If legal action is intended or underway; complaints will be suspended until the legal process is resolved
  • if we find that anyone has broken our equality policy we will investigate and take disciplinary action if appropriate
  • we will monitor our equality actions through our usual reporting systems
  • we will publish information each year to show how we are meeting our equality duties

Have your say

Please give your comments on our draft equality and diversity statement by completing our quick and easy online survey.

The survey closes on Friday 21 May

To request a paper copy of the survey or other formats, or if you require any further information, please email equality@northyorks.gov.uk with your contact information and details of your enquiry or ring us on 01609 780780.

This consultation closed on 30 April 2021.


We are working with Selby District Council, with funding from the York & North Yorkshire Local Enterprise Partnership (YNY LEP) on a Places and Movement Study. We want you to have your say on proposals.

The study will propose improvements to key streets and spaces in Selby District’s town centres which will benefit residents, businesses, and visitors alike. The study will help us to fully understand current and future issues and propose solutions that result in these centres being accessible to all and places that people want to live and work in and enjoy. Funding will need to be secured for these improvements, and the study is the first stage in doing this, to identify what changes people would like to see happen.

The project is separate to proposals for improvements taking place at Selby Station and the surrounding area. The Selby Station proposals are part of the Leeds City Region Transforming Cities Fund (TCF) programme. The improvements proposed in the Places and Movement Study are designed to be delivered in addition to changes around the station.

The project covers areas within Selby Conservation Area and Selby Heritage Action Zone (HAZ) Project, and the improvements proposed in the Places and Movement study are designed with consideration of heritage assets and aims to enhance these.

Our project journey

Initially, we are asking for your thoughts on proposals for Selby town centre and Sherburn-in-Elmet. Proposals for Tadcaster will be brought forward towards the end of 2021, once there is an agreed way forward on the town centre changes proposed in the Selby District Local Plan and following further technical assessment of those proposals.

The proposals for all the towns will form indicative packages for delivery in the short to medium term, subject to funding.

Your feedback will shape designs for the proposals in both areas and a preferred option for the three different movement options in Selby town centre will be selected.

In the next stage of the project, subject to funding being secured, further modelling work and assessment will take place for the preferred movement option. Further consultation will take place on designs as they develop. Final designs will need to go through the planning process before construction.

Improving our places

The vision of the study is: ‘The town centres of Selby District will transform by 2030 to provide exemplary, attractive, and accessible places for all to live, work and explore.’

The vision has informed the following objectives:

  • To support the perception of place and strengthen the local identity of the towns
  • To promote sustainable travel and accessibility to/ through the town centres
  • Futureproofing the towns to support wider objectives

Each town has specific challenges and opportunities and therefore will have different solutions. The existing issues this study aims to improve are the following:

  • Traffic congestion
  • Carbon emissions
  • Limited walking and cycling connections
  • Integration between transport modes
  • Safety and accessibility in town centres
  • Heavy Goods Vehicle (HGV) movements through town centres
  • Air quality and impact on public health
  • A need to create attractive spaces that encourage activity

In Sherburn-in-Elmet the study aims to address the following additional issues

  • Vehicle dominated environment
  • Limited crossing points for pedestrians and cyclists
  • Informal parking of vehicles
  • Narrow pavements
  • Limited greenery

The proposals

We are asking for your feedback on proposals in two areas: Selby town centre and Sherburn-in-Elmet. The proposals form indicative packages for a range of measures to improve the areas. Selby has three options to consider relating to the movement of vehicles.

View the plans and visualisations below to help you understand what is proposed. We have also provided answers to some frequently asked questions (FAQ’s) and a glossary of terms.

Selby Town Centre Movement Options

There are 3 options for the movement of vehicles in Selby town centre. A preferred highways option will be selected following this consultation, and further highway modelling work and assessment will take place for the preferred option.

Selby Highway Option A

Selby highways option a

Selby Highway Option B

Selby Highway Option B

Selby Highway Option C

Selby Highway Option C

Selby Town Centre Area Proposals

Under the different movement options (A, B and C) in Selby Town Centre, a number of improvements are enabled in these areas, and are outlined below each image. Each image is labelled with the highways option(s) that enable these improvements. A Location Plan is provided to show the location of the different areas in Selby that the images relate to.

Selby location plan

Selby Market Place/The Crescent

Option A/B

  • Public realm enhancement
  • Removal of street clutter
  • Continuation of quality surface materials on footways throughout the space
  • Permanent closure of Finkle Street to vehicles
  • Opportunity to introduce planting and more seating
  • Option B could feature courtesy crossings due to reduced traffic volumes

Market place option A/B

The Crescent Option A/B

Option C

  • One-way road offers additional space for planting and seating
  • Continuation of quality surface materials on footways and crossing points
  • Permanent closure of Finkle Street to vehicles
  • Appropriate softening of boundary treatment around the Abbey to reconnect it with the public realm and Selby Park

Market Place Option C

The Crescent Option C

Selby Micklegate

Option A/B

  • Public realm enhancement to provide central civic space
  • Tree planting
  • Enhancement of public realm around Abbot’s Staith building
  • Removal of most parking spaces to maximise adaptable space for events

Micklegate Option A/B

Option C

  • Public realm enhancement to provide central civic space
  • Tree planting
  • Enhancement of public realm around Abbot’s Staith building
  • Retention of some parking as required

Micklegate Option C

Micklegate Sketch

Selby Back Micklegate

  • Proposals for Back Micklegate could be brought forward without changes to the movement of vehicles in Selby.
  • Reconfiguration of parking spaces to enable tree planting to soften the appearance of the car park
  • Widened footways to enhance pedestrian safety and attractiveness
  • Improved entrance into car park to ensure its presence is clear to those arriving in Selby
  • Definition of the pedestrian route through to Micklegate including a pedestrian bridge over the dam.

Back Micklegate plan

Back Micklegate Sketch

Selby New Street

Option A/B

  • Removal of street clutter and guard railing to maximise footway space for pedestrians
  • Courtesy crossings to provide traffic calming and more opportunities to cross the road safely
  • Opportunity for higher quality surface materials in the footway and crossing points

New Street Option A/B

Option C

  • Narrowing of the road width to one lane enabling footways to be widened for pedestrians, and vehicle dominance on the street to be reduced
  • High quality surface materials to align with Market Place giving a sense of a continuous street, appropriate to the Selby Conservation Area.
  • Improved air quality enabled by reduced traffic volumes.

New Street Option C

Selby Riverside

Option A/B

  • Narrowing of the road to maximise footways and provide space for planting to create a green riverside corridor
  • Courtesy crossings allow places to cross and provide traffic calming measures
  • Management of riverside vegetation to enable views to the river

Selby Riverside option A/B

Option C

  • Narrowing of the road width to one lane to maximise footways and provide space for planting to create a green riverside corridor
  • Courtesy crossings with quality surface materials allow places to cross, provide traffic calming measures and maintain the identity of the town centre
  • Management of riverside vegetation to enable views to the river

Riverside Option C

Selby Flaxley Road/New Millgate

Option A/B

  • Reconfiguration of road layout to widen footways, introduce planting and street trees, and provide courtesy crossing points
  • On street parking provided where required
  • Opportunity to introduce cycling infrastructure with additional space created

Option C

  • Reconfiguration of road layout to widen footways, introduce planting and street trees, and provide courtesy crossing points
  • Junctions improved to provide traffic calming
  • Opportunity to introduce cycling infrastructure with additional space created

Flaxley Road option C

Flaxley Road option C sketch

New Millgate Option C

New Millgate Option C sketch

Selby Western Gateway (Scott Road Junction)

Option A/B

  • Gateway design features to announce arrival into the town
  • Reconfiguration of road layout and junction to maximise width of footways, introduce planting and street trees, and provide clear crossing points
  • Public realm enhanced around the Town Hall building as the focal point of the space and an important cultural hub
  • Quality surface materials on footways and crossings

Option C

  • Gateway design features to announce arrival into the town
  • Reconfiguration of road layout and junction to maximise width of footways, introduce planting and street trees, and provide clear crossing points
  • Public realm enhanced around the Town Hall building as the focal point of the space and an important cultural hub
  • Quality surface materials on footways and crossings
  • Opportunity to permanently close York Street to vehicles and provide continuous crossing point

Western Gateway Option C

Sherburn-in-Elmet Area Proposals

The following images indicate proposals for improvements to place in Sherburn-in-Elmet and these are outlined below each image. A Location Plan is provided to show the location of the different areas in Sherburn-in-Elmet that the images relate to.

Sherburn-in-Elmet location plan

Finkle Hill

  • Removal of off-street parking to provide a new public realm space as a focal point for the town.
  • Provision of on street parking bays.
  • Widening of footways, introduction of planting and street trees.
  • Street furniture to offer informal seating whilst deterring illegal parking.
  • Quality surface materials enhance the sense of place and contribute to the identity of the town.

Finkle Hill

Kirkgate/Finkle Hill junction

  • Reconfiguration of junction layout to widen footways and improve crossing points for pedestrians.
  • Quality surface materials on footways and crossing points provide continuity through the town and contribute to its identity.
  • Street furniture to offer informal seating whilst deterring illegal parking and improving perception of pedestrian safety.

Kirkgate/Finkle Hill

Low Street (North)

  • Removal of off-street parking to provide a new public realm space as a focal point for the town.
  • Provision of on street parking bays.
  • Widening of footways, introduction of planting and street trees.
  • Street furniture to offer informal seating whilst deterring illegal parking.
  • Quality surface materials on footways and raised crossing points helps prioritise pedestrians and promotes slower vehicle speeds.

Low Street north

Low Street (South)

  • Reconfiguration of parking to provide a positive pedestrian environment and sense of place.
  • Quality surface materials on footways and crossing points provide continuity through the town and contribute to its identity.
  • Raised area across the Church View and Wolsey Croft junction provides traffic calming and improves pedestrian safety for crossing.

Low Street south

Online events

The online events have now passed. You can:

You can also view the  presentation from the online events (pdf / 4 MB). If you use assistive technologies, such as screen readers, and need this document in another format please get in touch.

See FAQ's from the online events

What is the overall reduction in car parking spaces likely to be in Sherburn with your current proposals?

This is not yet determined, and would be part of any future scheme development work, should proposals be taken forward.

Has a feasibility study been done on the impacts on traffic of narrowing Kirkgate in Sherburn? What are the impacts on flow? Will long vehicles be able to swing to turn left from outside Red Bear left into Kirkgate?

This type of detailed work would be undertaken at a later stage, should any of the recommended proposals be selected as a preferred option following this consultation.

Will sustainable transport be built-in eg scooter hire, cycle spaces, electric car charging?

Yes, this is something, which will be considered in more detail should a preferred option be further developed.

Are there any plans for Tadcaster?

Ideas for Tadcaster will be developed towards the end of 2021, to allow for progression of proposals in the Selby District Local Plan.

Where has the money come from to pay for WSP consultancy?

The study has been jointly funded by North Yorkshire County Council, Selby District Council and the York and North Yorkshire Local Enterprise Partnership.

Why not propose an Oxford Street-style crossing at the cross-roads in Sherburn so pedestrians can cross from corner to corner and not wait for two sets of crossing lights to change?

We hope to bring forward enhancement ideas as a later stage of this work.

Are you going to improve Barlby Road?

These proposals are for the town and village centres. Selby District Council is talking separately to Forfarmers about Barlby Road - it is recognised that improvements can be made.

Gowthorpe for pedestrians only at least limited times or days. Beverley has done it and it’s busy. Can we be brave and do it too? Give us back our streets.

This consultation is to allow people to give their views on whether the benefits of the proposals are worth some potential inconvenience - we will take all views into consideration and would ask that you fill in the survey.

If my understanding of the suggestions for Selby is correct, Selby would be a huge loop so that shoppers parking in the Sainsburys area or at the leisure centre then have to continue one way.  Very impractical if you have come from and returning to Thorpe Willoughby and beyond that direction.

This consultation is to allow people to give their views on whether the benefits of the proposals are worth some potential inconvenience - we will take all views into consideration and would ask that you fill in the survey.

It's not clear on the NYCC website that the images are concepts of how things could change; feel more like the actual proposals.

We have covered the 'project journey' in the introductory text to explain the stage of the study to those responding.

What about Covid?

The proposals are intended to allow more space for people in the town centres and to socialise outdoors.

Can we install seating in social groupings with bins? (including recycling and dog waste)

Please tell us your views by filling in the survey and adding your comments.

I cycle into and around town nearly every day. Will you ask us about cycle lanes? Usually the design companies don't know the town or how we use our space.

This study considers the Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP) for Selby and Sherburn Active travel is an important objective in the study and proposals include the potential for cycle infrastructure on Scott Road, Flaxley Road, and New Millgate.

Please fill in the survey and add your comments.

Does funding allow for ongoing maintenance?

The cost estimates developed for the scheme will take into account initial maintenance costs. In the longer term, maintenance will be taken on by the relevant authority.

Any information on safe cycle routes into town?

A cycling and walking plan has been developed for Selby District Council which sets out a variety of routes on which infrastructure could be delivered.  These are now considered as part of any project, and where funding is available, will be put forward for consideration.

How will one way roads impact emergency services vehicle access in Selby town centre?

We will work with the emergency services, as a statutory consultee in regard to the preferred proposals both in terms of vehicular access and ensuring safety in design for those on foot in public spaces.

How will you encourage visitors without the ease of access and reduction of car parking?

The proposals seek to maintain a balance between different modes of transport and how they move around the town. Whilst accepting that appropriate access for vehicles should be maintained, the proposals aim to make walking and cycling into the town much easier, ideally removing short vehicles trips where this is possible.

The proposals also provide space to create a much more attractive town centre, encouraging people from the wider district to choose Selby over other larger destinations.  It is accepted that there will always be a need for suitably located parking provision and this will be considered as part of further development of a preferred option.

Have you considered the benefits of electric & zero emissions vehicles?

Yes, this has been considered as part of the study and any option taken forward will take into account facilities for new technologies and future mobility developments.

Next steps

Following the closure of the public consultation on Friday 30th April, all feedback on proposals will be considered. There will be more opportunities to provide feedback on detailed designs and plans once funding has been secured for the next stage of the project.

For any enquiries, please contact selbypandmstudy@northyorks.gov.uk


NYCC logo, Selby logo and LEP logo

Diocese of York

Ingleby Arncliffe Church of England Primary School

Proposed order under section 554 and 556 of The Education Act 1995

Notice is herby given:

  1. That the Secretary of State for Education proposes to make an order under sections 554 and 556 of the Education Act 1996 in respect of the above mentioned Church of England educational foundation. The purpose of sections 554 and 556 is to enable the assets of discontinued denominational voluntary schools to be applied for the benefit of new and continuing voluntary schools and foundation schools of the same denomination within the state system of education. The order will, where appropriate, authorise the sale of the premises described.
  2. That under sections 554 and 556 of the Education Act 1996 any person interested may within one month after the date of this Notice make representations on the proposed order in writing to the Secretary of State at the Department’s address given below.

A copy of the draft order may be inspected from Monday to Friday between 10 am and 4pm at Main Reception, County Hall, Northallerton DL7 8AD

Additional copies can be obtained from the Department for Education, Real Estate Team, Bishopsgate House, Darlington, DL1 5QE or email: land.transactions@education.gov.uk 

25th February 2021

Read  the Statutory Instruments Document. (pdf / 303 KB)

This consultation closed on 24 March 2021.


Find out about the Leeds City Region Transforming Cities Fund programme, a major new programme of investment that aims to create a step change in travel across the region. 

North Yorkshire County Council, Harrogate Borough Council, Craven District Council, Selby District Council and West Yorkshire Combined Authority have been successful in a bid to secure £31m for projects in Selby, Skipton and Harrogate town centres, through the Leeds City Region Transforming Cities Fund.

The project is part of the Leeds City Region Transforming Cities Fund programme, a major new programme of investment that aims to create a step change in travel across the region. This investment will also help ‘level up’ the UK economy and redistribute wealth, jobs and investment more equitably across the four nations. This investment forms part of a much wider plan to tackle the climate crisis and deliver a more sustainable future for the region.

In each town, a major package of investment will improve opportunities for sustainable travel and link transport hubs with centres of education and employment – all essential to getting back on track after the Covid-19 pandemic. This is a once in a generation chance to totally re-design parts of the town centres, with investment that will help to fire up the engine on the journey to recovery.

We want to know what you think about the proposals and will be hosting a series of online events where you can hear more and ask questions, before completing an online survey when the consultation opens on 24 February 2021.

What to do next

Have your say!

We want as many people, businesses and organisations as possible to fill in the online survey and help shape the projects for each town.

Fill in the online survey.

The consultation is running from 24 February 2021 until to 24 March 2021.

Attend a live event

Scheme Date and Time Join

Harrogate

Wednesday 3 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Harrogate

Wednesday 10 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Skipton

Tuesday 2 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Skipton

Thursday 11 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Selby

Thursday 4 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Selby

Friday 12 March at 6pm

Event has passed

This consultation ended on 23 February 2021


This page sets out details of a proposal to lower the age range of Scarborough Pupil Referral Unit from 11-16 to 4-16, on 31 August 2021. It gives the background to the proposal. There will be a virtual public meeting on: 18 January at 7pm.

If you wish to be part of this virtual meeting could you please let us know by emailing schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk

If you do not have the facilities to participate in a virtual meeting but would still like to take part could you please liaise directly with Scarborough Pupil Referral Unit, Valley Bridge Parade, Scarborough YO11 2PG, 01609 536516

Background

Local authorities are responsible for arranging suitable full-time education for permanently excluded pupils, and for other pupils who – because of illness or other reasons – would not receive suitable education without such provision. This applies to all children of compulsory school age resident in the local authority area, whether or not they are on the roll of a school, and whatever type of school they attend. Full-time education for excluded pupils must begin no later than the sixth day of the exclusion.

Pupil Referral Units (PRUs) are a type of alternative provision which educates pupils who are unable to access mainstream schooling for any of the reasons set out above.

Although located in Scarborough town the PRU provides education to pupils from across the Scarborough District.

The Proposal

Scarborough Pupil Referral Unit has historically had an age range of 11-16 and itis predominantly pupils within this age range who have required this type of provision. However, there have also been a small number of pupils aged under 11 who have been excluded and have required an alternative provision. In these circumstances a number of provisions in primary schools have provided places. In 2019 it was considered by officers that the expertise of the PRU was best suited to provide these places to the younger pupils. For the last year the PRU has temporarily accommodated a number of pupils aged under 11 and it is now the view of officers that this should be formalised as a longer term arrangement until at least such time that the SEND Strategic Plan is fully implemented.

It is essential that the Local Authority maintain options to provide provision for primary aged pupils who are excluded from school. The number of places required is likely to be very low and  it is unlikely that the Scarborough PRS would support more than 5 primary age pupils at any one time.

The PRU is considered the most appropriate provision to lead on the education of this younger group of pupils. The staff and leadership at the PRU have the necessary professional skills and primary education training to meet the needs of these pupils. At the last Ofsted inspection in 2018 the provision was judged ‘Good’ and the effectiveness Leadership and Management was judged ‘Outstanding’. This proposal is being made with the support of the Leadership at the Scarborough PRU.

What Happens Next?

Your views about this proposal are welcomed.

This survey has closed.

Paper responses should be returned to the address below:

Freepost RTKE-RKAY-CUJS
Scarborough Pupil Referral Unit
Strategic Planning
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
DL7 8AE

The closing date for responses is 23 February 2021

All responses to the consultation received by this date will be considered by the County Council’s Executive Member for Education and Skills on Tuesday 9 March 2021.

Anticipated Key Dates

All dates are subject to approvals at each stage.

Stage

Date

Approval to Consult by Executive Members

15 December 2020

Consultation opens

(6 weeks during term time)

12 January 2021

Virtual Public meeting

18 January 2021

Consultation closes

23 February 2021

 Executive Members for Education and Skills considers consultation response

9 March 2021

Executive Members decision whether to implement

9 March 2021

Proposed Implementation date

31 August 2021

This consultation ended on 19 February 2021.


Notice is given in accordance with section 15(1) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, intends to discontinue St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School (Voluntary Aided), Waterstead Lane, Whitby, North Yorkshire, YO21 1PZ on 9 April 2021.

Copies of the complete proposal can be obtained from: Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE and are available below.

Within four weeks from the date of publication of this proposal, any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by sending them to Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, or by email to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk by 5pm on 19 February 2021.

Signed: B. Khan

Assistant Chief Executive

(Legal and Democratic Services)

Publication Date: 22 January 2021

Supporting documents

Statutory proposals for closure of St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School

Consultation document

List of Consultees

Record of public meeting

Response to consultation

Equality impact assessment

This consultation ended on 5 March 2021.


Notice is given in accordance with section 15(1) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, intends to discontinue Kell Bank Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, Healey, Masham, North Yorkshire, HG4 4LH on 31 August 2021.

Copies of the complete proposal can be obtained from: Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE and are available below.

Within four weeks from the date of publication of this proposal, any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by sending them to Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, or by email to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk by 5pm on 5 March 2021.

Signed: B. Khan

Assistant Chief Executive

(Legal and Democratic Services)

Publication Date: 5 February 2021

Supporting documents

 Statutory proposals for school closures Kell Bank (pdf / 363 KB)

 Kell Bank published consultation document (pdf / 500 KB)

 List of consultees (pdf / 285 KB)

 Record of public meeting 17 November 2020 (pdf / 545 KB)

 Record of public meeting 2 December 2020 (pdf / 353 KB)

 Responses to the consultation document (pdf / 309 KB)

 Equality Impact Assessment Kell Bank C of E Primary School (pdf / 636 KB)

If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need a version of these document in a more accessible format, please get in touch.

This consultation ended on 7 March 2021.


A consultation on Section 75 Partnership Agreement for 0-19 Healthy Child Service in North Yorkshire.

North Yorkshire County Council and Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust would like to enter into a formal partnership arrangement to allow the Trust to deliver the 0-19 Healthy Child Service (Health Visiting and School Age Service) on the Council’s behalf.  This would involve the Trust and the Council entering into a Partnership Agreement under Section 75 of the National Health Service Act 2006.

To do this, the Council and the Trust, as potential partners, have to consult with any stakeholders who they think may be affected by the arrangements. 

Please refer to documents below for further information:

1. Section 75 Healthy Child Service FAQs

2. Section 75 Healthy Child Service consultation document

 3. Draft Section 75 agreement (pdf / 3 MB) If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please get in touch.

If you would like to make any comments or share your views regarding these arrangements please fill in the survey or email: healthychild@northyorks.gov.uk.

The consultation runs from 5 February 2021 to 7 March 2021.

This consultation was ended on 8 February 2021


Proposal to lower the age range of Stillington Primary School to provide a nursery class

The Executive approved the publication of a statutory notice on 24 November 2020 regarding proposals to lower the age range of pupils from 4 to 11 to 3 to 11 at Stillington Primary School with effect from 23 February 2021.

This will give a further four weeks for representation to be made. Any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by 5pm on 8 February 2021.

Have your say

Comments on the statutory notice can be sent to:
Strategic Planning - Children and Young People's Service
North Yorkshire County Council<
County Hall
Northallerton
DL7 8AD

This consultation will run from the 11 January to the 5pm on 8 February.

Supporting documents

Stillington Primary School Statutory Notice

Stillington Statutory Proposal

Background Information

Report to Executive – 24 November 2020

This consultation ended on Friday 22 January 2021.


North Yorkshire County Council has identified the need to establish a new mixed mainstream primary school for children aged 4 to 11 in Northallerton to open in September 2022. We are therefore seeking proposals to establish an academy under section 6A of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 (the ‘free school presumption’). 

Summary of key school information

School’s Characteristic

Description

School type

Mainstream primary

Age range

4-11  Reception to Year 6

Published admission number

30

Size / Capacity

210 places

Gender

Mixed

Opening date

September 2022

Opening profile

First year of operation:  Reception only

Second year:  Reception and Year 1

Adding a further year group for the third year of operation and beyond until full opening is achieved

Admission arrangements       

Oversubscription criteria to be determined by the chosen Academy Trust.

North Yorkshire County Council propose that the new Northallerton School will not have a defined catchment area. Instead priority for admission to the School would be determined by proximity to it.

North Yorkshire County Council propose that the new Northallerton School will not have a defined catchment area. Instead priority for admission to the School would be determined by proximity to it.

Proposers should follow the guidance in the  specification Northallerton document (pdf / 1 MB) and completed application forms should be returned to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk  by Friday 22 January 2021.

This consultation ended on 22 January 2021


Would your Academy Trust be interested in operating a new primary school for North Yorkshire?

North Yorkshire County Council has identified the need to establish a new mixed mainstream primary school with nursery for children aged 3 to 11 in Knaresborough to open in September 2022. We are therefore seeking proposals to establish an academy under section 6A of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 (the ‘free school presumption’). 

Summary of key school information

School’s Characteristic

Description

School type

Mainstream primary

Age range

3-11  Nursery to Year 6

Published admission number

30

Size / Capacity

210 places

Gender

Mixed

Opening date

September 2022

Opening profile

First year of operation: Nursery and Reception only

Second year: Nursery, Reception and Year 1

Adding a further year group for the third year of operation and beyond until full opening is achieved

Admission arrangements

Oversubscription criteria to be determined by the chosen Academy Trust.

North Yorkshire County Council propose a defined school catchment for the area covered by the Manse Farm and Highfield Farm developments. 

Proposers should follow the guidance in the  specification Knaresborough document (pdf / 692 KB) and completed application forms should be returned to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk by Friday 22 January 2021.

This consultation ended on Monday 11 January 2021


We want North Yorkshire to be a thriving county, which adapts to a changing world and remains a special place for everyone to live, work and visit. We also want to prioritise economic growth and invest in the rollout of superfast broadband so that everyone has good access to digital services.

The financial challenges we are facing are set to continue. Our finances have reduced, but demand for our services has increased. Particular pressures include Covid-19 response and recovery, roads, supporting adults and older people who need help to live independently and helping to make sure children and young people have the best possible start in life.

To help shape our council plan and annual budget we want your views on which of our priorities matter most to you. By taking part in this consultation, you will help us decide how we focus our resources in very challenging and uncertain times.

Council plan

The council plan sets out our priorities and actions for the next four years. It includes our key ambitions and explains how we intend to deliver services that meet the needs of people in North Yorkshire.

The council plan sets out our vision and values and describes a three pronged approach - to provide leadership, enable individuals, families and communities to do the best for themselves, and to ensure the delivery of our own high quality services.

To achieve this, the plan identifies five key ambitions:

Ambitions

Supporting outcomes

Leading for North Yorkshire

A confident North Yorkshire championing the case for a fairer share of resources for our communities.

Working with partners and local communities to improve health and economic outcomes for North Yorkshire.

Resilient, resourceful and confident communities co-producing with the County Council.

Every child and young person has the best possible start in life

A healthy start to life with safe and healthy lifestyles.

Education as our greatest liberator with high aspirations, opportunities and achievements.

A happy family life in strong families and vibrant communities.

Every adult has a longer, healthier and independent life

People are safe, with individuals, organisations and communities all playing a part in preventing, identifying and reporting neglect or abuse. 

People have control and choice in relation to their health, independence and social care support. 

People can access good public health services and social care across our different communities.

North Yorkshire is a place with a strong economy & a commitment to sustainable growth

A larger business base and increased number of good quality jobs in North Yorkshire.

People across the county have equal access to economic opportunities

Increased overall average median wage

Innovative and forward thinking Council

Easy and effective access to County Council services.

Challenging ourselves to change, innovate and deliver value for money support services to improve the customer experience.

A motivated and agile workforce working efficiently and effectively to drive innovation.

Operating on a commercial basis, where this is prudent and appropriate, to deliver a return which supports service delivery to those most in need.

See the full council plan here.

We are currently refreshing our council plan for 2021 to 2025.

Longer term plans

A devolution deal for York and North Yorkshire could potentially unlock around £2.4bn of investment over 30 years, with a focus on improving the economic prosperity and future long-term opportunities for all residents through significant investment in transport, broadband, skills and climate change initiatives. 

To be eligible to bid for a devolution deal, the County Council submitted a proposal to government for a single council for North Yorkshire. This would bring together the services currently provided by North Yorkshire County Council, Craven District Council, Hambleton District Council, Harrogate Borough Council, Richmondshire District Council, Ryedale District Council, Scarborough Borough Council and Selby District Council. This would make sizeable savings of £30-67m per year and would deliver improved services in the longer term. 

We are committed to gaining a devolution deal as soon as possible to generate significant funding for the county at a critical moment as we drive economic recovery post-pandemic and to allow more decisions to be made locally by, and for, the people who live and work here.

Find out more about our proposal new unitary council.

Budget

North Yorkshire County Council, like most local authorities, has faced a very challenging financial environment in the last 10 years with significant reductions in government funding but increasing demand. As a result, the county council’s spending power has reduced by more than a third over the last decade. 

If this wasn’t difficult enough there is, of course, the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. We estimate that coronavirus will cost the council an additional £82m this year, taking into account extra essential expenditure and lost income.  This includes outbreak management, test and trace, providing information and support, funding the voluntary sector to support people with shopping, collecting prescriptions and making befriending calls, provision of grants for voluntary organisations, food vouchers, contacting those who were shielding and providing transport for medical appointments.

There have already been significant reductions in council tax and business rates income because of the pandemic and we anticipate that these will continue into the longer term. These are unprecedented and uncertain times.

Despite already making significant savings, we face the prospect of having to take yet more difficult decisions about balancing the council’s finances whilst still protecting key services. As part of this, we want to hear your thoughts about how you think we should manage and prioritise our finances.

Where does the council's money come from?

Our funding comes from four main areas: Council tax, charges to users and similar income, central government grants and business rates.

  • A little under half (47%) of our income is from council tax.
  • Fees, charges and other income make up 26%. These are things we specifically charge for such as parking or care home fees.
  • Allocated government grants and joint funding (e.g. from the NHS) is money we receive that has to be spent on the specific thing it was intended for and makes up 17%.
  • Our business rates give us 10% of our income.

What is the money spent on?

Health and adult services

Older people

£123m

Young adults – learning disabilities

£91m

Other young adults

£29m

Public health

£22m

Other

£6m

Children and young people’s services

Children’s social care

£44m

Home to school transport

£28m

Education support and other

£18m

Special educational needs

£14m

Business and environmental services

Waste

£51m

Highways

£39m

Concessionary fares

£9m

Planning, trading standards, economic development

£8m

Transport fleet

£7m

Public transport

£3m

In addition we have £76m of capital funding that we use to carry out longer term repairs to roads and bridges.

Other

 

Organisational support

£54m

Capital financing

£24m

Customer, communities, libraries

£16m

Property costs

£13m

Others

£24m

The medium-term financial strategy sets out how resources will be put in place to support the delivery of the council plan and to enable priorities and service objectives to be achieved. The medium-term financial strategy sets out how resources will be put in place to support the delivery of the council plan and to enable priorities and service objectives to be achieved.

Savings so far

By the end of the 2020-21 financial year, we will have made revenue savings of around £178m. Focusing our savings on increasing our own efficiency has helped us to keep the impact on front line services to a minimum, but the more we need to save, the more difficult this becomes. Almost three quarters of the savings to date have come from efficiency savings (£136m), including:

£57m - Improved ways of working

£29m - Reducing costs of buying goods and services

£20m - Reductions in support services, back office and administrative support

£21m - Increased income from selling services to schools and other councils

£6m - Reductions in the number of managers

£3m - Reductions in staff terms and conditions

We have tried to protect frontline services and only around a quarter of savings (£42m) so far have come from frontline services. These have included:

  • changes to library services with many now being run by community groups;
  • replacing elderly persons’ homes with extra care housing to better meet the needs of older people, supporting them to retain their independence;
  • changing to a model of providing targeted support to children and young people while reducing the number of children’s centres;
  • public transport; or
  • changes to grass-cutting services.

We need to find a further £103m over the next three years to meet the remaining funding gap. This will be extremely challenging but we are working on plans and proposals.

We have submitted a proposal for a single North Yorkshire Council to make significant savings and improve services but also to unlock around £2.4bn of investment from a devolution deal for York and North Yorkshire. Find out more about our proposal for a new unitary council.

This consultation ended on 4 January 2021


Introduction

North Yorkshire is home to 130,000 children and young people.

Ensuring a good start in life is a shared goal for all parents, families and communities, as well as for the local organisations responsible for health, education, childcare and welfare.

There is an African proverb that it takes a village to raise a child and that is as true in North Yorkshire as it is around the world. Many people play a part in enabling babies, children and young people to grow and develop at key milestones in their lives. North Yorkshire is a good place in which to live as a child or young person, with a good range of childcare provision, high performing schools and well-recognised health and care services for those children, young people and parents who need extra support.

North Yorkshire County Council, in partnership with Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust, is proposing a new model for the Healthy Child Programme (which currently comprises Health Visiting and School Nursing Services) in the county. We want to hear your views about our proposals and how they can be implemented.

The Healthy Child Programme, which supports children and young people aged 0-19 and their families, is one service amongst many. It offers both universal services (services that every child and family should get, such as the new born visit at 10-14 days) for all children, young people and families and targeted help for those most in need.

Proposals

  • We propose intensifying our focus on children under 5, based on the evidence that supporting them has a greater impact throughout life, gives them the best start in life and prepares them to be ready to learn.
  • We want to secure longer term funding and certainty for the Healthy Child Programme in North Yorkshire, within the context of the national reduction in Public Health Grant which is the main source of funding for the service.
  • We propose extending and developing the partnership between North Yorkshire County Council and Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust (HDFT), to provide the service for a period of up to ten years, taking us to 2031.
  • We want to learn from the emergency changes made to the current service during the response to Covid-19.
  • We propose implementing a new service model as a result of all of the above factors.

Our commitments

In putting these proposals forward, we are making clear pledges to you.

  • All children and young people will receive universal and targeted services to enable them to have the best start in life, through our work in children’s ‘early help’ and social care, schools and community support for children and young people with additional needs. ‘Early help’ provides support when need is identified at any point in a child’s life. It is not a specific service but a joined up approach across all service providers to work with children, young people and families to prevent the need for statutory/costly interventions.
  • We will prioritise our public health grant-funded Healthy Child Programme towards children under five, to support their early development and to ensure that they are ready to learn.
  • All new-born babies and their parent(s)/carer(s) will have a face-to-face visit from a qualified Health Visitor.
  • We will continue to provide targeted support for 5-19 year olds, through a range of different programmes and services.
  • Our Healthy Child 0-19 services will combine a mix of face-to-face, online, individual and group work services, tailored to the personal circumstances of each family.
  • We will continue to work with children and families, local service providers in the public and private sector, and voluntary and community groups to ensure that the right support is provided by the right person and at the right time.

What is the Healthy Child Programme?

The Healthy Child Programme is a national health promotion and early support programme for children, young people and their families. It aims to bring together health, education and other partners to deliver an effective programme of services and support. There is a mandatory requirement to provide some elements of the programme.

The programme is currently comprised of the following services.

  • An evidence-based approach for the delivery of public health services to families with children aged 0-5, led by Health Visitors.
  • Early intervention and prevention public health programmes for children and young people aged 5-19 and their families. These build on the pregnancy to 0-5 service and are led by school nurses.

Since the transfer of Public Health services to councils in April 2013, the Healthy Child Programme has been paid for by local government, under the direction of the Director of Public Health. Most councils, but not all, have worked with an NHS partner to provide the service. In North Yorkshire, until now, Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust has provided separate services for children aged 0-5 and 5-19.

How is the service provided currently?

The current service can be summarised as follows.

0-5 Years - Health visiting 5-19 Years - School nursing

5 mandatory health reviews

  • Antenatal (28 weeks) check: Health promoting visit
  • 10-14 days after birth: New baby review
  • 6-8 weeks old: 6-8 week assessment
  • 9-12 months old: One year assessment
  • 2-2½ years old (two to two-and a half-year integrated review)

A range of services and support given to families.

5 Health reviews

  • 4-5 year old health needs assessment
  • 10-11 year-old health needs assessment
  • Screening service
    • National Child Measurement Programme which measures the height and weight of children and brief advice given to families if child is overweight or obese (mandatory requirement)
    • Vision and hearing screening at school entry
  • Support for emotional wellbeing and resilience and  reducing risk-taking in young people.

As such, the Healthy Child Programme forms part of a comprehensive network of children and young people’s services commissioned and provided by North Yorkshire County Council, the NHS and other partners in the county. It means that there is an extensive range of support for all children, young people and their families, as well as extra help for those who need it most. Many of the children’s services provided by North Yorkshire County Council and Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust are rated by the regulators, Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission, as outstanding or good.

The range and quality of children and young people’s services in the county puts North Yorkshire in a relatively good position when public services are faced with significant cuts in the funding they receive from Central Government. In this case, we are facing a year on year cut of up to £4 million in the Public Health Grant for North Yorkshire.

It is within this context that the County Council is proposing changes to the Healthy Child Programme, with a view to making savings while ensuring that all children continue to have the best start in life and have access to the right support as they grow into adulthood.

Why are we proposing to change the service?

There are three main reasons why we are proposing to change the current service.

The national Public Health Grant is being reduced.

This means that North Yorkshire will lose up to £4 million funding and all Public Health programmes will have to make savings as a consequence. Indeed, some will stop altogether. These proposals, alongside investment in children and young people’s emotional and mental well-being and services to reduce drug and alcohol misuse, mean that a third of the Public Health Grant available to the County will continue to be spent on children and young people. This translates to 33% of Public Health Grant being spent on children and young people who constitute about 22% of the North Yorkshire population.

The savings from the Healthy Child Programme budget is £750,000 over three years.

Our priority is to focus on children aged under five

The foundations of a healthy life are set in early childhood and in North Yorkshire we wish to prioritise investment in children aged 0-5 years in order to ensure they have the best start in life.  In the context of the reduction in the Public Health Grant, the council seeks to secure this through a long term funding arrangement for the Healthy Child Programme for a period of up to 10 years.  There is evidence that indicates a focus on 0-5 years does not only support improving health outcomes, but improves wider societal and economic outcomes. National policy related to providing the best start in life provides further evidence that increasing investment in children aged 0-5 years can impact on childhood obesity, emotional wellbeing and school readiness. Improvements in these areas will in turn support lifelong positive outcomes.

The universal elements of the Healthy Child Programme identify children and families who are at risk of poor outcomes and who are in need of additional support.  Focussing assessment on children aged 0-5 means the most vulnerable families can be provided with additional support at the earliest opportunity. Health visitors and their teams are skilled practitioners who build parental confidence and can ensure families receive early help before problems develop further. This approach can not only improve the life chances of the child but should reduce demand for higher cost specialist services as the child grows older and, later, in adult life.

We have learned from how services have operated under Covid-19 restrictions

The pandemic has changed how we deliver the current service for the long-term. The profound impact of the virus on society and on public services means that people have been using services differently and some staff have developed new roles and skills. As national lockdown is easing, the current service is recovering but it will never return to the pre-Covid-19 status because of the emergency changes we implemented. This consultation is proposing to learn from the service that has been provided during the Covid-19 pandemic. For example, many families have given feedback saying that access to advice over the telephone, on face time or online has been really helpful to them.

The service will use tools that have been shown to be effective in identifying and measuring risks to assess family need and risk, and ensure that families most in need receive face-to-face contacts.

What will the proposed new service look like?

Most parents and carers can confidently support their child’s development, but some experience challenges that can make this task more difficult. Factors such as poor mental health, financial hardship or ongoing conflict in a relationship all influence parents’ ability to provide a nurturing environment for their child. There are a range of health promotion activities, support and practices which have good evidence of improving outcomes for children, by working directly with children themselves and helping parents or practitioners to support children’s development.

The new service will focus on health promotion activities and early support. It will be an integrated 0-19 service that brings together many aspects of what is currently provided by the health visiting (0-5) and School Nursing (5-19) services. We will continue to provide all of the mandatory elements of the service for all age groups. For a small number of families, this may be through a virtual or digital offer. There will be universal and targeted provision with a focus on families with children under the age of five, delivered by appropriately trained, skilled teams. This approach will be an important way of providing children and young people with the skills and resilience they need to achieve a variety of important positive health and wellbeing effects, including increased physical and mental wellbeing, educational attainment, and reduced youth crime and anti-social behaviour.

The new service will build on learning about how services have operated under Covid-19 restrictions, introducing a blended approach of face-to-face and online contact for families, based on robust assessment of the child and family’s needs; Families and young people have engaged with services in a way that is relevant and appropriate to their needs and staff have developed new skills to support them in doing so. For example, some people have opted to get extra support online, including peer support from, and group work with, other families.

For under 5s, the proposals prioritise infant feeding and family diet and nutrition and childrens’ readiness to learn as areas for improvement in the new service. For children and young people aged 5-19, the proposals prioritise emotional health and resilience and risk taking behaviour as areas for improvement in the new service. This will allow greater integration of the NHS-led Healthy Child Programme with the County Council’s Children and Young People’s Service and other relevant services across health and social care.

The new service will be delivered through a partnership between North Yorkshire County Council and Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust, using what’s called a Section 75 Agreement (which gives powers to local authorities to delegate the provision of services to an NHS Foundation Trust). There will be a separate 30-day public consultation on the partnership agreement in the winter of 2020/2021.

How will the new service be different from the current service?

The proposed new service is significantly different from the current service in a number of ways. It will continue to deliver universal services for all families and will also allow for resources to be targeted to those most in need. Protecting children at risk of harm and those in need remains the top priority.

The main changes are as follows.

  • All new babies will have a face-to-face visit from a Health Visitor, and follow up visits will be either face-to-face or online, depending on the family’s needs and identified risks.
  • Services will be provided face-to-face or virtually dependent on family need and identified risks.
  • All contacts with children under one year will be undertaken by a qualified health visitor.
  •  Contacts with families with a child over one year old will be delivered by a skilled team under the direction of a health visitor. This approach will allow for a co-ordinated and integrated approach in responding to needs.
  • Some of the services provided to school aged children (5-19) such as vision and hearing screening, and advice and support about daytime and night time wetting for school age children will not be provided.
  • Support for emotional wellbeing and resilience and in reducing risk taking in young people will be enhanced.
  • We are working closely with local partners (Families, Clinical Commissioning Groups, Primary Care, NHS Hospitals, Voluntary Organisations and Community Groups) to ensure that children and families are supported to access alternative services, for the aspects of the current service that will no longer be delivered with the new service.  We will ensure that children, young people and families and the wider public have the information on how to access alternative services and support.

What does our equality impact assessment say?

We have carried out an equality impact assessment (EIA).

Equality impact assessments ensure that our policies, services and legislation do not discriminate against anyone and that, where possible, we promote equality of opportunity.

We will update this following comments received during the consultation and the North Yorkshire County Council Executive and the Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust Board will consider it again before a final decision is made on implementing the new service. The EIA has identified that there will be an impact on children and young people receiving some aspects of the service that will no longer be provided and we will offer support to families to adapt to those changes.  The strength of North Yorkshire’s full range of children and young people’s services will help families to get the support that they need.

We anticipate that, if these proposals are implemented, the new service will have a positive impact for children, young people and their families, particularly as there will be a single, more integrated 0-19 service across the county which will lead to a more responsive service for children and families. However, we recognise that aspects of the current service delivery model will not be delivered and the partnership will carry out an analysis of the gaps in services to be fully aware of potential risks.

A combination of face-to-face, online and group based service delivery can increase and improve how children and families can be supported. We anticipate that by making joint decisions with families, health and social care providers and schools, the right care and support will be available in a timely manner and that, by greater joint working, we will increase and improve how children and families are supported.

How to have your say on these proposals

We want to hear your views on the proposals and, in particular on the following three questions:

  1. In the context of a national reduction in North Yorkshire’s Public Health Grant of up to £4 million in the next few years, do you support the proposals to prioritise children under 5, and their families, so that they have the best start in life?
  2. In the context of a national reduction in North Yorkshire’s Public Health Grant of up to £4 million in the next few years, do you support the proposals for 5-19 year olds which are focussed on,
    • supporting vulnerable young people
    • developing a service to help young people improve their emotional resilience and wellbeing.

How would you see that support being provided to children and young people?

  1. We have learned from how we had to adapt during the Covid-19 pandemic, and in future, we want to deliver some of the Healthy Child Programme online and via the telephone.

How do you think digital and telephone services could help support families in North Yorkshire?

Answer these questions, tell us your views and give us your suggestions

This survey has now closed.

See an easy read version of this consultation.

Online events

You can also register for an online event to hear about our proposals and ask questions:

Date

Time

Register

3 November 2020

10:30

This event has passed.

5 November 2020

13:30

This event has passed.

6 November 2020

10:30

This event has passed.

17 November 2020

10:30

This event has passed.

18 November 2020

18:00

This event has passed.

19 November 2020

13:30

This event has passed.

Unfortunately, due to Covid-19 restrictions, it is unlikely that we will be able to host face-to-face events during this consultation

How long is the consultation?

This will be a 10-week consultation beginning on Monday 26 October 2020 and ending on Monday 4 January 2021 The feedback received will be presented to NYCC and HDFT Executives, and subject to the outcome of the consultation it is anticipated the new service will be in place on 1 April 2021.

What happens after the consultation closes?

The responses received during this public consultation will be considered by North Yorkshire County Council’s Executive, as well as its Scrutiny of Health Committee, and by Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust Board, before any final decision is made.

Subject to the outcome of this consultation and due consideration, it is proposed that the new service will begin on 1 April 2021.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is this public consultation about?

This consultation is about the proposals for an integrated 0-19 Healthy Child Service, which includes Health Visiting (0-5) and School Aged (5-19) services, and the proposed new model for delivery of the mandated contacts and targeted support for families.

What is the Healthy Child Programme?

The Healthy Child Programme is a national public health programme for children, young people and their families. It aims to bring together health, education and other partners to deliver an effective programme of early intervention, prevention and support. There is a statutory requirement for the Council to provide some elements of the programme.

NHS health visitors lead the delivery of public health services and support to families, from pregnancy to children aged 0-5.

School nurses lead some of the public health services and support for children, young people (aged 5-19) and their families.

Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust currently provides the Healthy Child Programme in North Yorkshire.

Why a new service model is being proposed?

The national Public Health Grant in North Yorkshire has reduced by up to £4 million. As a result, North Yorkshire County Council will have to make savings across all Public Health programmes. Some programmes have stopped or will stop.

In the context of the reduction in Public Health Grant, we are prioritising children aged 0-5. This is based on the evidence that increasing investment in children during their early years can positively affect many areas of a child’s life, which in turn support lifelong positive outcomes.

We have also prioritised support for vulnerable young people and emotional resilience and wellbeing in children and young people.

Protecting children at risk of harm and those in need remains the top priority for the programme.

We are looking to continue our relationship with Harrogate and District Foundation Trust for a longer term of up to 10 years. This will provide the opportunity to transform the way we provide services to children and families, and help closely align the programme with the Early Help Service run by the County Council’s Children and Young People’s Service, as well as other health services and community support.

How will vulnerable children and young people be supported?

There will be no significant change to the health visitors’ role in local safeguarding procedures and processes.

The School Aged (5-19) Safeguarding Model includes a team aligned with the North Yorkshire Multi-Agency Screening Team (MAST) to support safeguarding procedures where it is deemed appropriate for the service to be engaged beyond the initial strategy meeting. The new model for children and young people aged 5-19 includes a specialist team of nurses to support children subject to a child protection plan and children who are looked after. The model adheres to the North Yorkshire Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Practices.

What difference will the new service model make to children, young people and families?

Every family with a child under 5 years will receive the five mandatory health reviews. The service will aim to deliver on 100% of contacts with a focus on face to face delivery for key contacts (the five health reviews detailed in the table in the ‘How is this service provided currently’ section) and families identified as requiring face to face/ home visits through a robust Family Health Needs Assessment. Some contacts will be carried out using virtual methods based on robust risk assessment.

However, because of the reduction in Public Health grant and the focus on children under 5, the programme will not be able to provide the level of service that has previously been provided to school aged children (5-19). Some of the services that have stopped or will stop include:

  • Hearing and vision screening at school entry
  • Perinatal mental health listening visits (support for women who may experience anxiety and depression during pregnancy and after childbirth)
  • Drop-ins in schools – to offer advice and support on health and wellbeing issues (e.g. children with asthma and sexual health support)
  • Level 1 continence support (advice and support about daytime and night time wetting) for school age children
  • Sexual health services
  • Sign off school health care plans
  • School entry and Year 6 health questionnaires

How will I get support for the services that are stopping?

The Healthy Child Programme is only one source of support and information for children and families, and they are often in contact with many services and agencies. The proposals present the opportunity for closer working between the programme and other health and social services and community support, to ensure support that meets the individual needs of children, young people and families.

We are therefore working together to develop systems and processes that will enable families and young people to access the support they need. Some of these are explained below.

Families with children under 5 years

Will I still have a named health visitor?

Every family with a child under 5 years will have a named health visitor.

Will all child health clinics close? How will babies be weighed?

Well Baby Clinics will not be offered as part of the proposed model. Babies will be weighed in line with the recommendations in the Healthy Child Programme for example when targeted support is required to support with infant feeding or where babies need targeted support to monitor development.

The service will assess community need and use venues to provide group support to meet the needs of the local population. For example, group activities to support breast feeding or maternal mental health/ perinatal mental health and attachment.

How will perinatal mental health concerns be identified and supported if perinatal mental health listening visits no longer take place?

The Health Visitor will identify maternal mental health needs through the Family Health Needs Assessment and assessment of risk factors. Targeted support may be provided through listening visits (support for women who may experience anxiety and depression during pregnancy and after childbirth) or group activity or signposting to online support and activities.

How will young parents be supported?

Young parents will continue to be considered a vulnerable group and will receive all five mandated contacts and targeted support when required.

Children and young people (5-19)

Will my school have a named school nurse?

No, there will not be capacity in the 5-19 workforce to provide a named school nurse for each school. The service will develop online support available to schools. The emotional health and resilience team will provide targeted support to children and young people at Tier 1 Children and Adolescent Mental Health Service level (early support for children and young people with low level emotional and mental health issues).

What will happen if parents have concerns about their child’s hearing?

Hearing will be considered at all 0-5 health reviews. At any point health visitors can refer direct to audiology for a hearing test. We are also developing ways that will enable professionals (e.g. teachers and GPs) to refer children with hearing problems to hospital audiology services for a hearing test. 

What will happen if parents have concerns about their child’s vision?

Routine eye checks are offered to newborn babies and young children to identify any problems early. Free NHS sight tests are also available at opticians for children under 16 and for young people under 19 in full-time education.

Who will sign off school health care plans for children and young people with managed asthma, epilepsy and diabetes?

There is not a formal requirement for health care plans to be “signed off” by a health professional. However, the health professional overseeing the child’s care would be asked to input into the plan. This can be any health professional and would only be a school nurse if they are overseeing the child's care

Who will provide continence support (advice and support about daytime and night time wetting) for school age children?

We are developing ways that families can access the information they need to self-manage these conditions at the level 1 (low level) stage.

Who will provide sexual health advice and support?

The Council will continue to support the delivery of quality Personal, Social and Health Education (PHSE) and implementation of statutory relationships and sex education (SRE) in schools.  The service will provide effective signposting to local sexual health services.

Monthly GP liaison will stop and will be delivered differently. What does this mean?

The current process for GP liaison about children, young people and families will be reviewed. We will discuss how the health visiting and school nursing services liaise with practices in partnership with GPs once the new model is agreed.

Glossary

Local organisations

A local organisation is an organisation which delivers services or activities in a particular area. For us this means within the North Yorkshire boundary in one or all of the 7 local district or borough areas.

Universal services

Services that every child and family should get for example the new born visit at 10-14 days.

Targeted services

Services that are for people with specific needs, for example the emotional and mental wellbeing service for young people.

Early help

Early Help provides support when need is identified at any point in a child’s life. It is not a specific service but a joined up approach across all service providers to work with children, young people and families to prevent the need for statutory/costly interventions.

Public sector agencies

Public sector agencies are organisations which deliver Government provided services such as North Yorkshire County and District Councils or partners such as Harrogate District Foundation Trust

Evidence based approach

An approach where research has proven that services and support work well. This approach helps us to agree what to carry on doing and what to change.

Evidence based tools

Evidence based tools can be things like questionnaires, interviews, observations, risk assessments. These tools can help us to identify what works well and what does not.

Commissioned services

This is where the local authority (e.g. NYCC) has asked and appointed a provider to deliver a particular service. For example, NYCC has commissioned HDFT to provide parts of the Healthy Child Programme like health visiting and school nursing services.

Outcomes

We want any services we provide to be able to support you and your child to have a healthy start. This is an ‘outcome’ of the service commissioned.

Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs)

CCGs are groups of general practices (GPs) which come together in each area to commission the best services for their patients and population.

Primary care

This is the first point of contact with the health care system. Primary care includes general practice, community pharmacy, dental, and optometry (eye health) services.

Gap analysis

An analysis of the gaps in services, which should include what needs to be done to address them.

Mandated contacts

Mandatory visits that every family with a child under five receives from the health visitor to carry out health reviews. 

Key mandated contacts/visits

  • Antenatal (28 weeks) check: health promoting visit
  • 10-14 days after birth: new baby review
  • 6-8 weeks old: 6-8 week assessment
  • 9-12 months old: one year assessment
  • 2-2½ years old (two to two-and a half-year integrated review)

Child Protection Plan

This is a plan made after a child has been the subject of a Child Protection case conference.

Local safeguarding procedures and processes

These are guidelines and activities that explain what the council will do to keep children and young people safe.

Tier 1 services

Early support for children and young people with low level emotional and mental health issues.