View the results of previous consultations and details of next steps.

Consultations from 2021

This consultation closed on 30 April 2021.


We are working with Selby District Council, with funding from the York & North Yorkshire Local Enterprise Partnership (YNY LEP) on a Places and Movement Study. We want you to have your say on proposals.

The study will propose improvements to key streets and spaces in Selby District’s town centres which will benefit residents, businesses, and visitors alike. The study will help us to fully understand current and future issues and propose solutions that result in these centres being accessible to all and places that people want to live and work in and enjoy. Funding will need to be secured for these improvements, and the study is the first stage in doing this, to identify what changes people would like to see happen.

The project is separate to proposals for improvements taking place at Selby Station and the surrounding area. The Selby Station proposals are part of the Leeds City Region Transforming Cities Fund (TCF) programme. The improvements proposed in the Places and Movement Study are designed to be delivered in addition to changes around the station.

The project covers areas within Selby Conservation Area and Selby Heritage Action Zone (HAZ) Project, and the improvements proposed in the Places and Movement study are designed with consideration of heritage assets and aims to enhance these.

Our project journey

Initially, we are asking for your thoughts on proposals for Selby town centre and Sherburn-in-Elmet. Proposals for Tadcaster will be brought forward towards the end of 2021, once there is an agreed way forward on the town centre changes proposed in the Selby District Local Plan and following further technical assessment of those proposals.

The proposals for all the towns will form indicative packages for delivery in the short to medium term, subject to funding.

Your feedback will shape designs for the proposals in both areas and a preferred option for the three different movement options in Selby town centre will be selected.

In the next stage of the project, subject to funding being secured, further modelling work and assessment will take place for the preferred movement option. Further consultation will take place on designs as they develop. Final designs will need to go through the planning process before construction.

Improving our places

The vision of the study is: ‘The town centres of Selby District will transform by 2030 to provide exemplary, attractive, and accessible places for all to live, work and explore.’

The vision has informed the following objectives:

  • To support the perception of place and strengthen the local identity of the towns
  • To promote sustainable travel and accessibility to/ through the town centres
  • Futureproofing the towns to support wider objectives

Each town has specific challenges and opportunities and therefore will have different solutions. The existing issues this study aims to improve are the following:

  • Traffic congestion
  • Carbon emissions
  • Limited walking and cycling connections
  • Integration between transport modes
  • Safety and accessibility in town centres
  • Heavy Goods Vehicle (HGV) movements through town centres
  • Air quality and impact on public health
  • A need to create attractive spaces that encourage activity

In Sherburn-in-Elmet the study aims to address the following additional issues

  • Vehicle dominated environment
  • Limited crossing points for pedestrians and cyclists
  • Informal parking of vehicles
  • Narrow pavements
  • Limited greenery

The proposals

We are asking for your feedback on proposals in two areas: Selby town centre and Sherburn-in-Elmet. The proposals form indicative packages for a range of measures to improve the areas. Selby has three options to consider relating to the movement of vehicles.

View the plans and visualisations below to help you understand what is proposed. We have also provided answers to some frequently asked questions (FAQ’s) and a glossary of terms.

Selby Town Centre Movement Options

There are 3 options for the movement of vehicles in Selby town centre. A preferred highways option will be selected following this consultation, and further highway modelling work and assessment will take place for the preferred option.

Selby Highway Option A

Selby highways option a

Selby Highway Option B

Selby Highway Option B

Selby Highway Option C

Selby Highway Option C

Selby Town Centre Area Proposals

Under the different movement options (A, B and C) in Selby Town Centre, a number of improvements are enabled in these areas, and are outlined below each image. Each image is labelled with the highways option(s) that enable these improvements. A Location Plan is provided to show the location of the different areas in Selby that the images relate to.

Selby location plan

Selby Market Place/The Crescent

Option A/B

  • Public realm enhancement
  • Removal of street clutter
  • Continuation of quality surface materials on footways throughout the space
  • Permanent closure of Finkle Street to vehicles
  • Opportunity to introduce planting and more seating
  • Option B could feature courtesy crossings due to reduced traffic volumes

Market place option A/B

The Crescent Option A/B

Option C

  • One-way road offers additional space for planting and seating
  • Continuation of quality surface materials on footways and crossing points
  • Permanent closure of Finkle Street to vehicles
  • Appropriate softening of boundary treatment around the Abbey to reconnect it with the public realm and Selby Park

Market Place Option C

The Crescent Option C

Selby Micklegate

Option A/B

  • Public realm enhancement to provide central civic space
  • Tree planting
  • Enhancement of public realm around Abbot’s Staith building
  • Removal of most parking spaces to maximise adaptable space for events

Micklegate Option A/B

Option C

  • Public realm enhancement to provide central civic space
  • Tree planting
  • Enhancement of public realm around Abbot’s Staith building
  • Retention of some parking as required

Micklegate Option C

Micklegate Sketch

Selby Back Micklegate

  • Proposals for Back Micklegate could be brought forward without changes to the movement of vehicles in Selby.
  • Reconfiguration of parking spaces to enable tree planting to soften the appearance of the car park
  • Widened footways to enhance pedestrian safety and attractiveness
  • Improved entrance into car park to ensure its presence is clear to those arriving in Selby
  • Definition of the pedestrian route through to Micklegate including a pedestrian bridge over the dam.

Back Micklegate plan

Back Micklegate Sketch

Selby New Street

Option A/B

  • Removal of street clutter and guard railing to maximise footway space for pedestrians
  • Courtesy crossings to provide traffic calming and more opportunities to cross the road safely
  • Opportunity for higher quality surface materials in the footway and crossing points

New Street Option A/B

Option C

  • Narrowing of the road width to one lane enabling footways to be widened for pedestrians, and vehicle dominance on the street to be reduced
  • High quality surface materials to align with Market Place giving a sense of a continuous street, appropriate to the Selby Conservation Area.
  • Improved air quality enabled by reduced traffic volumes.

New Street Option C

Selby Riverside

Option A/B

  • Narrowing of the road to maximise footways and provide space for planting to create a green riverside corridor
  • Courtesy crossings allow places to cross and provide traffic calming measures
  • Management of riverside vegetation to enable views to the river

Selby Riverside option A/B

Option C

  • Narrowing of the road width to one lane to maximise footways and provide space for planting to create a green riverside corridor
  • Courtesy crossings with quality surface materials allow places to cross, provide traffic calming measures and maintain the identity of the town centre
  • Management of riverside vegetation to enable views to the river

Riverside Option C

Selby Flaxley Road/New Millgate

Option A/B

  • Reconfiguration of road layout to widen footways, introduce planting and street trees, and provide courtesy crossing points
  • On street parking provided where required
  • Opportunity to introduce cycling infrastructure with additional space created

Option C

  • Reconfiguration of road layout to widen footways, introduce planting and street trees, and provide courtesy crossing points
  • Junctions improved to provide traffic calming
  • Opportunity to introduce cycling infrastructure with additional space created

Flaxley Road option C

Flaxley Road option C sketch

New Millgate Option C

New Millgate Option C sketch

Selby Western Gateway (Scott Road Junction)

Option A/B

  • Gateway design features to announce arrival into the town
  • Reconfiguration of road layout and junction to maximise width of footways, introduce planting and street trees, and provide clear crossing points
  • Public realm enhanced around the Town Hall building as the focal point of the space and an important cultural hub
  • Quality surface materials on footways and crossings

Option C

  • Gateway design features to announce arrival into the town
  • Reconfiguration of road layout and junction to maximise width of footways, introduce planting and street trees, and provide clear crossing points
  • Public realm enhanced around the Town Hall building as the focal point of the space and an important cultural hub
  • Quality surface materials on footways and crossings
  • Opportunity to permanently close York Street to vehicles and provide continuous crossing point

Western Gateway Option C

Sherburn-in-Elmet Area Proposals

The following images indicate proposals for improvements to place in Sherburn-in-Elmet and these are outlined below each image. A Location Plan is provided to show the location of the different areas in Sherburn-in-Elmet that the images relate to.

Sherburn-in-Elmet location plan

Finkle Hill

  • Removal of off-street parking to provide a new public realm space as a focal point for the town.
  • Provision of on street parking bays.
  • Widening of footways, introduction of planting and street trees.
  • Street furniture to offer informal seating whilst deterring illegal parking.
  • Quality surface materials enhance the sense of place and contribute to the identity of the town.

Finkle Hill

Kirkgate/Finkle Hill junction

  • Reconfiguration of junction layout to widen footways and improve crossing points for pedestrians.
  • Quality surface materials on footways and crossing points provide continuity through the town and contribute to its identity.
  • Street furniture to offer informal seating whilst deterring illegal parking and improving perception of pedestrian safety.

Kirkgate/Finkle Hill

Low Street (North)

  • Removal of off-street parking to provide a new public realm space as a focal point for the town.
  • Provision of on street parking bays.
  • Widening of footways, introduction of planting and street trees.
  • Street furniture to offer informal seating whilst deterring illegal parking.
  • Quality surface materials on footways and raised crossing points helps prioritise pedestrians and promotes slower vehicle speeds.

Low Street north

Low Street (South)

  • Reconfiguration of parking to provide a positive pedestrian environment and sense of place.
  • Quality surface materials on footways and crossing points provide continuity through the town and contribute to its identity.
  • Raised area across the Church View and Wolsey Croft junction provides traffic calming and improves pedestrian safety for crossing.

Low Street south

Online events

The online events have now passed. You can:

You can also view the  presentation from the online events (pdf / 4 MB). If you use assistive technologies, such as screen readers, and need this document in another format please get in touch.

See FAQ's from the online events

What is the overall reduction in car parking spaces likely to be in Sherburn with your current proposals?

This is not yet determined, and would be part of any future scheme development work, should proposals be taken forward.

Has a feasibility study been done on the impacts on traffic of narrowing Kirkgate in Sherburn? What are the impacts on flow? Will long vehicles be able to swing to turn left from outside Red Bear left into Kirkgate?

This type of detailed work would be undertaken at a later stage, should any of the recommended proposals be selected as a preferred option following this consultation.

Will sustainable transport be built-in eg scooter hire, cycle spaces, electric car charging?

Yes, this is something, which will be considered in more detail should a preferred option be further developed.

Are there any plans for Tadcaster?

Ideas for Tadcaster will be developed towards the end of 2021, to allow for progression of proposals in the Selby District Local Plan.

Where has the money come from to pay for WSP consultancy?

The study has been jointly funded by North Yorkshire County Council, Selby District Council and the York and North Yorkshire Local Enterprise Partnership.

Why not propose an Oxford Street-style crossing at the cross-roads in Sherburn so pedestrians can cross from corner to corner and not wait for two sets of crossing lights to change?

We hope to bring forward enhancement ideas as a later stage of this work.

Are you going to improve Barlby Road?

These proposals are for the town and village centres. Selby District Council is talking separately to Forfarmers about Barlby Road - it is recognised that improvements can be made.

Gowthorpe for pedestrians only at least limited times or days. Beverley has done it and it’s busy. Can we be brave and do it too? Give us back our streets.

This consultation is to allow people to give their views on whether the benefits of the proposals are worth some potential inconvenience - we will take all views into consideration and would ask that you fill in the survey.

If my understanding of the suggestions for Selby is correct, Selby would be a huge loop so that shoppers parking in the Sainsburys area or at the leisure centre then have to continue one way.  Very impractical if you have come from and returning to Thorpe Willoughby and beyond that direction.

This consultation is to allow people to give their views on whether the benefits of the proposals are worth some potential inconvenience - we will take all views into consideration and would ask that you fill in the survey.

It's not clear on the NYCC website that the images are concepts of how things could change; feel more like the actual proposals.

We have covered the 'project journey' in the introductory text to explain the stage of the study to those responding.

What about Covid?

The proposals are intended to allow more space for people in the town centres and to socialise outdoors.

Can we install seating in social groupings with bins? (including recycling and dog waste)

Please tell us your views by filling in the survey and adding your comments.

I cycle into and around town nearly every day. Will you ask us about cycle lanes? Usually the design companies don't know the town or how we use our space.

This study considers the Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP) for Selby and Sherburn Active travel is an important objective in the study and proposals include the potential for cycle infrastructure on Scott Road, Flaxley Road, and New Millgate.

Please fill in the survey and add your comments.

Does funding allow for ongoing maintenance?

The cost estimates developed for the scheme will take into account initial maintenance costs. In the longer term, maintenance will be taken on by the relevant authority.

Any information on safe cycle routes into town?

A cycling and walking plan has been developed for Selby District Council which sets out a variety of routes on which infrastructure could be delivered.  These are now considered as part of any project, and where funding is available, will be put forward for consideration.

How will one way roads impact emergency services vehicle access in Selby town centre?

We will work with the emergency services, as a statutory consultee in regard to the preferred proposals both in terms of vehicular access and ensuring safety in design for those on foot in public spaces.

How will you encourage visitors without the ease of access and reduction of car parking?

The proposals seek to maintain a balance between different modes of transport and how they move around the town. Whilst accepting that appropriate access for vehicles should be maintained, the proposals aim to make walking and cycling into the town much easier, ideally removing short vehicles trips where this is possible.

The proposals also provide space to create a much more attractive town centre, encouraging people from the wider district to choose Selby over other larger destinations.  It is accepted that there will always be a need for suitably located parking provision and this will be considered as part of further development of a preferred option.

Have you considered the benefits of electric & zero emissions vehicles?

Yes, this has been considered as part of the study and any option taken forward will take into account facilities for new technologies and future mobility developments.

Next steps

Following the closure of the public consultation on Friday 30th April, all feedback on proposals will be considered. There will be more opportunities to provide feedback on detailed designs and plans once funding has been secured for the next stage of the project.

For any enquiries, please contact selbypandmstudy@northyorks.gov.uk


NYCC logo, Selby logo and LEP logo

Diocese of York

Ingleby Arncliffe Church of England Primary School

Proposed order under section 554 and 556 of The Education Act 1995

Notice is herby given:

  1. That the Secretary of State for Education proposes to make an order under sections 554 and 556 of the Education Act 1996 in respect of the above mentioned Church of England educational foundation. The purpose of sections 554 and 556 is to enable the assets of discontinued denominational voluntary schools to be applied for the benefit of new and continuing voluntary schools and foundation schools of the same denomination within the state system of education. The order will, where appropriate, authorise the sale of the premises described.
  2. That under sections 554 and 556 of the Education Act 1996 any person interested may within one month after the date of this Notice make representations on the proposed order in writing to the Secretary of State at the Department’s address given below.

A copy of the draft order may be inspected from Monday to Friday between 10 am and 4pm at Main Reception, County Hall, Northallerton DL7 8AD

Additional copies can be obtained from the Department for Education, Real Estate Team, Bishopsgate House, Darlington, DL1 5QE or email: land.transactions@education.gov.uk 

25th February 2021

Read  the Statutory Instruments Document. (pdf / 303 KB)

This consultation closed on 24 March 2021.


Find out about the Leeds City Region Transforming Cities Fund programme, a major new programme of investment that aims to create a step change in travel across the region. 

North Yorkshire County Council, Harrogate Borough Council, Craven District Council, Selby District Council and West Yorkshire Combined Authority have been successful in a bid to secure £31m for projects in Selby, Skipton and Harrogate town centres, through the Leeds City Region Transforming Cities Fund.

The project is part of the Leeds City Region Transforming Cities Fund programme, a major new programme of investment that aims to create a step change in travel across the region. This investment will also help ‘level up’ the UK economy and redistribute wealth, jobs and investment more equitably across the four nations. This investment forms part of a much wider plan to tackle the climate crisis and deliver a more sustainable future for the region.

In each town, a major package of investment will improve opportunities for sustainable travel and link transport hubs with centres of education and employment – all essential to getting back on track after the Covid-19 pandemic. This is a once in a generation chance to totally re-design parts of the town centres, with investment that will help to fire up the engine on the journey to recovery.

We want to know what you think about the proposals and will be hosting a series of online events where you can hear more and ask questions, before completing an online survey when the consultation opens on 24 February 2021.

What to do next

Have your say!

We want as many people, businesses and organisations as possible to fill in the online survey and help shape the projects for each town.

Fill in the online survey

The consultation is running from 24 February 2021 until to 24 March 2021.

Attend a live event

Scheme Date and Time Join

Harrogate

Wednesday 3 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Harrogate

Wednesday 10 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Skipton

Tuesday 2 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Skipton

Thursday 11 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Selby

Thursday 4 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Selby

Friday 12 March at 6pm

Event has passed

This consultation ended on 23 February 2021


This page sets out details of a proposal to lower the age range of Scarborough Pupil Referral Unit from 11-16 to 4-16, on 31 August 2021. It gives the background to the proposal. There will be a virtual public meeting on: 18 January at 7pm.

If you wish to be part of this virtual meeting could you please let us know by emailing schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk

If you do not have the facilities to participate in a virtual meeting but would still like to take part could you please liaise directly with Scarborough Pupil Referral Unit, Valley Bridge Parade, Scarborough YO11 2PG, 01609 536516

Background

Local authorities are responsible for arranging suitable full-time education for permanently excluded pupils, and for other pupils who – because of illness or other reasons – would not receive suitable education without such provision. This applies to all children of compulsory school age resident in the local authority area, whether or not they are on the roll of a school, and whatever type of school they attend. Full-time education for excluded pupils must begin no later than the sixth day of the exclusion.

Pupil Referral Units (PRUs) are a type of alternative provision which educates pupils who are unable to access mainstream schooling for any of the reasons set out above.

Although located in Scarborough town the PRU provides education to pupils from across the Scarborough District.

The Proposal

Scarborough Pupil Referral Unit has historically had an age range of 11-16 and itis predominantly pupils within this age range who have required this type of provision. However, there have also been a small number of pupils aged under 11 who have been excluded and have required an alternative provision. In these circumstances a number of provisions in primary schools have provided places. In 2019 it was considered by officers that the expertise of the PRU was best suited to provide these places to the younger pupils. For the last year the PRU has temporarily accommodated a number of pupils aged under 11 and it is now the view of officers that this should be formalised as a longer term arrangement until at least such time that the SEND Strategic Plan is fully implemented.

It is essential that the Local Authority maintain options to provide provision for primary aged pupils who are excluded from school. The number of places required is likely to be very low and  it is unlikely that the Scarborough PRS would support more than 5 primary age pupils at any one time.

The PRU is considered the most appropriate provision to lead on the education of this younger group of pupils. The staff and leadership at the PRU have the necessary professional skills and primary education training to meet the needs of these pupils. At the last Ofsted inspection in 2018 the provision was judged ‘Good’ and the effectiveness Leadership and Management was judged ‘Outstanding’. This proposal is being made with the support of the Leadership at the Scarborough PRU.

What Happens Next?

Your views about this proposal are welcomed.

This survey has closed.

Paper responses should be returned to the address below:

Freepost RTKE-RKAY-CUJS
Scarborough Pupil Referral Unit
Strategic Planning
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
DL7 8AE

The closing date for responses is 23 February 2021

All responses to the consultation received by this date will be considered by the County Council’s Executive Member for Education and Skills on Tuesday 9 March 2021.

Anticipated Key Dates

All dates are subject to approvals at each stage.

Stage

Date

Approval to Consult by Executive Members

15 December 2020

Consultation opens

(6 weeks during term time)

12 January 2021

Virtual Public meeting

18 January 2021

Consultation closes

23 February 2021

 Executive Members for Education and Skills considers consultation response

9 March 2021

Executive Members decision whether to implement

9 March 2021

Proposed Implementation date

31 August 2021

This consultation ended on 19 February 2021.


Notice is given in accordance with section 15(1) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, intends to discontinue St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School (Voluntary Aided), Waterstead Lane, Whitby, North Yorkshire, YO21 1PZ on 9 April 2021.

Copies of the complete proposal can be obtained from: Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE and are available below.

Within four weeks from the date of publication of this proposal, any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by sending them to Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, or by email to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk by 5pm on 19 February 2021.

Signed: B. Khan

Assistant Chief Executive

(Legal and Democratic Services)

Publication Date: 22 January 2021

Supporting documents

Statutory proposals for closure of St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School

Consultation document

List of Consultees

Record of public meeting

Response to consultation

Equality impact assessment

This consultation ended on 5 March 2021.


Notice is given in accordance with section 15(1) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, intends to discontinue Kell Bank Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, Healey, Masham, North Yorkshire, HG4 4LH on 31 August 2021.

Copies of the complete proposal can be obtained from: Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE and are available below.

Within four weeks from the date of publication of this proposal, any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by sending them to Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, or by email to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk by 5pm on 5 March 2021.

Signed: B. Khan

Assistant Chief Executive

(Legal and Democratic Services)

Publication Date: 5 February 2021

Supporting documents

 Statutory proposals for school closures Kell Bank (pdf / 363 KB)

 Kell Bank published consultation document (pdf / 500 KB)

 List of consultees (pdf / 285 KB)

 Record of public meeting 17 November 2020 (pdf / 545 KB)

 Record of public meeting 2 December 2020 (pdf / 353 KB)

 Responses to the consultation document (pdf / 309 KB)

 Equality Impact Assessment Kell Bank C of E Primary School (pdf / 636 KB)

If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need a version of these document in a more accessible format, please get in touch.

This consultation ended on 7 March 2021.


A consultation on Section 75 Partnership Agreement for 0-19 Healthy Child Service in North Yorkshire.

North Yorkshire County Council and Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust would like to enter into a formal partnership arrangement to allow the Trust to deliver the 0-19 Healthy Child Service (Health Visiting and School Age Service) on the Council’s behalf.  This would involve the Trust and the Council entering into a Partnership Agreement under Section 75 of the National Health Service Act 2006.

To do this, the Council and the Trust, as potential partners, have to consult with any stakeholders who they think may be affected by the arrangements. 

Please refer to documents below for further information:

1. Section 75 Healthy Child Service FAQs

2. Section 75 Healthy Child Service consultation document

 3. Draft Section 75 agreement (pdf / 3 MB) If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please get in touch.

If you would like to make any comments or share your views regarding these arrangements please fill in the survey or email: healthychild@northyorks.gov.uk.

The consultation runs from 5 February 2021 to 7 March 2021.

This consultation was ended on 8 February 2021


Proposal to lower the age range of Stillington Primary School to provide a nursery class

The Executive approved the publication of a statutory notice on 24 November 2020 regarding proposals to lower the age range of pupils from 4 to 11 to 3 to 11 at Stillington Primary School with effect from 23 February 2021.

This will give a further four weeks for representation to be made. Any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by 5pm on 8 February 2021.

Have your say

Comments on the statutory notice can be sent to:
Strategic Planning - Children and Young People's Service
North Yorkshire County Council<
County Hall
Northallerton
DL7 8AD

This consultation will run from the 11 January to the 5pm on 8 February.

Supporting documents

Stillington Primary School Statutory Notice

Stillington Statutory Proposal

Background Information

Report to Executive – 24 November 2020

Consultations from 2020

This consultation ended on 4 December 2020


A consultation on the proposed school admission arrangements for community and voluntary controlled schools in 2022/2023

In accordance with our statutory duty under The School Admissions (Admission Arrangements and co-ordination of Admission Arrangements) (England) Regulation 2012 we are is consulting on proposed school admission arrangements for community and voluntary controlled schools 2022/2023.

The consultation closes on 4 December 2020. If you wish to respond please email schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk.

Voluntary Aided, Foundation, Academy, UTC and Free Schools

The determination of admission arrangements for Voluntary Aided, Foundation, Academy, UTC and Free Schools is a matter for the schools’ governing bodies as the admission authority for the school.  Any comments relating to a Voluntary Aided, Foundation, Academy, UTC or Free Schools should be addressed directly to the school in question.

The following schools are currently consulting on their admission arrangements:

This consultation ended on 14 December 2020


Proposal to close St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School, Whitby from 9 April 2021.

There will be a virtual public meeting on Tuesday 24 November at 7 pm.

If you wish to be part of this virtual meeting could you please let us know by emailing schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk and joining instructions will be provided

If you do not have the facilities to participate in a virtual meeting but would still like to engage directly in the consultation process then please liaise with St Hilda’s RC Primary School, Waterstead Lane, Whitby, North Yorkshire YO21 1PZ (Tel. 01947 603901)

Background

St Hilda’s Roman Catholic School is a small school located in Whitby that has no distinct catchment area but has historically served a wide area consisting primarily of Whitby and the surrounding rural area.

Pupil numbers at the school have been low compared to other local schools for many years and governors and leaders of the school as well as the Diocese and NYCC as the Local Authority (LA) have been aware of the school’s vulnerability. As a small school operating in an area with a significant surplus of school places the school is particularly susceptible to the effects of falling numbers due to parental preference.

Governors have worked hard to try and increase pupil numbers at the school notably by working alongside the Diocese to bring an Early Years education provider onto the school site and foster relations with these families. The governors, with support from the LA, have also attempted to make cost savings and reduce expenditure where possible.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Middlesbrough has been undergoing a process of converting all of their maintained schools into Academies under the leadership of multi-academy trusts. In December 2018 an academy order was signed for St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School. However, as with all academy conversions a process of due diligence was required before any conversion would be approved. In the case of St Hilda’s, the financial situation and projected financial outlook prevented the school from been accepted into a Trust.

Decision to consult upon closure in January 2020

In January 2020 the Governing Body asked the LA to enter into consultation to seek to close St Hilda’s RC Primary School due to the continued falling rolls and associated significant financial challenges faced by the school, coupled with the continued lack of applications for admission to the school from Catholic pupils.

During the consultation period in Spring 2020 a group of stakeholders made the case that they would like more time and some further engagement with the LA to explore further any options for keeping the school open. However, due to the Covid 19 Pandemic which closed the School, and the restrictions placed upon gatherings, it was not feasible to hold these kind of discussions within an appropriate timescale given the proposed closure date of 31 August 2020. Having first extended the consultation period, a decision was then taken by the LA in early April to not proceed with the proposal at that time, therefore allowing the opportunity for stakeholders to look at alternatives to closure.

Decision to consult upon closure in September 2020

As part of the work to satisfy themselves that all options had been considered, three local stakeholders, comprising two parents and County Councillor Joe Plant, joined the Schools Governing Body. Alongside this the Roman Catholic Diocese appointed further Foundation Governors to ensure a full range of expertise were available to look at the options. The changes constituted a complete restructure of the Governing Body as only two members remained from the previous board and a new Chair and Vice-Chair were appointed. The LA funded a piece of detailed financial analysis on options for the school going forward and provided additional professional support.

Following a short period of review the LA received a letter from the Governing Body of St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School in early September 2020 in which they stated, ‘With enormous sadness and deep regret, and after many months of sustained efforts to identify a solution to the funding crisis faced by the school, the governors of St Hilda’s RC Primary School feel they must once again ask North Yorkshire County Council to commence formal consultation on the proposed closure of our St Hilda’s.’

The Governing Body of St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School have not reached this decision lightly. They have decided that pupil numbers had fallen to an unsustainable level and found they were not able to set a balanced budget which is a legal requirement. The Diocese of Middlesbrough has confirmed that there is no evidence to require the continuation of Catholic provision in Whitby and the LA have confirmed that the school is not required to meet their duty to maintain sufficient school places. 

The LA is therefore now consulting on the proposal to close the school with effect from 9 April 2021.

Factors affecting the School’s viability

There are three main factors leading to this closure proposal. First, the number of children at St Hilda’s has fallen from 51 in 2015/16 to 19 in September 2020/21. The total pupil number has now fallen to 2 since the closure proposal was announced earlier this term.

Secondly, with pupil numbers largely determining the school budget the finances are not sustainable. The financial outlook has significantly worsened in line with the dramatic fall in pupils numbers and there is therefore no prospect of financial recovery.

Finally, the Diocese of Middlesbrough’s mission and purpose is to provide education with a Catholic character to Catholic children. Out of a total role of 24 children on roll at St Hilda’s in 2019/20 only 4 were Catholic. The Diocese confirmed at that time that there was no evidence to support the continuation of Catholic education in Whitby, as there appeared to be no other Catholic children seeking to attend the school. This position has not changed given the current number on roll.

Pupil Numbers

The number of children at St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School has been falling over the past few years. There were just 19 pupils on roll at the beginning of September 2020 and this total has fallen to 2 since the closure proposal was announced. The majority of the pupils who have recently left have taken advantage of the Diocese of Middlesbrough’s offer to ensure that places at, and transport to, St Hedda’s R.C Primary School, Egton Bridge would be made available for any pupils from St Hilda’s. Forecasts indicate there is no reasonable prospect of the numbers of pupils at St Hilda’s returning to sustainable levels.

 

Total pupils on roll at St Hilda’s

2015/16

51

2016/17

46

2017/18

31

2018/19

28

2019/20

24

1 September 2020

19

1 October  2020

2

The pupil roll over recent years has been well below the capacity of the school, which is designed to accommodate 105 pupils if all spaces are in use.

There is a significant surplus of school places across Whitby Town. Where possible school place planners seek to maintain a 5% to 10% surplus of places in a planning area to allow for flexibility within the system and parental preference to be exercises. In Whitby there is currently a surplus of over 30%. Even if all housing identified within the local plan was constructed at expected rates the surplus is projected to stand at 28% in 24/25.

If St Hilda’s were to close the surplus across the town would drop to 23% at present, and if all local plan housing was constructed at expected rates that surplus is projected to stand at 21% in 24/25.

The Financial Position

Pupil numbers determine the school budget.  With reducing pupil numbers, and a reduced budget, the finances are not sustainable.

Projected Budget Positions as at September 2021

In Year Deficit 2020/21

  • £39.6k

In Year Deficit 2021/22

  • £53.4k

In Year Deficit 2022/23

  • £30.7k

Cumulative Deficit end of 22/23

  • £144.7k

These projections were based on pupil number assumptions of 20 in Autumn 2020 and 26 in Autumn 2021. The financial outlook has significantly worsened in line with the dramatic fall in pupil numbers and there is therefore no prospect of financial recovery.

Schools Standards/Ofsted

The School’s last Ofsted inspection was in November 2017 and it confirmed that the school continued to be ‘Good’. This proposal is not based upon the quality of the education provision at St Hilda’s. However, it should be noted that where numbers of pupils at a school fall very low and budgets become restricted it provides an additional challenge to school standards.

Other local schools

The nearest local school, 0.1 miles from St Hilda’s Roman Catholic School, is Airy Hill Primary School, Whitby. There are also four other local Primary Schools; East Whitby Primary Academy, Ruswarp CE VC Primary School, Stakesby Primary Academy and West Cliff Primary School.

The nearest Roman Catholic School at 7.3 miles away is St Hedda’s Roman Catholic Primary School, Egton Bridge.

For children currently at St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School, North Yorkshire County Council will work with each family to try to meet their individual preferences for other schools. Governors at St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School are also committed to supporting families in their choice of school and in making a smooth transition. The Diocese of Middlesbrough will seek to ensure that spaces are available at the nearest Catholic Primary School (St Hedda’s  Primary School, Egton Bridge) and to provide transport for those pupils currently at St Hilda’s who wish to continue to receive a Catholic education. Some schools may be able to admit over their published admission numbers for some year groups.

Eligibility for home-to-school transport will be determined in line with the County Council’s current home-to- school transport policy and procedures, based on travel distances from each child’s home address and individual circumstances. 

Parents have a right to express a preference for any school. The LA is the admissions authority for community and voluntary controlled schools and will meet that preference provided there are vacant places or the school is happy to admit above the published admission number.  The governing body decides the conditions for admission to Voluntary Aided schools or Academy schools, whilst still bound by the Admissions Code. Where a child attends a school, which is not their normal school or nearest school, parents are normally responsible for making transport arrangements.  

North Yorkshire County Council’s Admissions Team is always happy to give advice to parents – please contact Vickie Hemming-Allen on 01609 535481 or Lisa Herdman on 01609 534953.

Details of other local schools

Based on January 2020 Census.

 

St Hilda’s RC Primary School

Airy Hill Primary School

East Whitby Primary Academy

Ruswarp CE VC  Primary School

Stakesby Primary Academy

West Cliff Primary School

Total

 

 

Academy

Academy

 

Academy

Academy

 

Distance from St Hilda’s RC School by road

NA

0.1 miles

1.1 miles

1.6 miles

0.9 miles

0.9 miles

 

Last Ofsted inspection

Good – June 2013

Not applicable

Not applicable

Good – March 2018

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

Net Capacity

(places available at the school)

105

210

315

105

233

210

1178

Current pupil roll

24

179

188

94

144

188

817

Current capacity

-/+

81

31

127

11

89

22

361

Pupil roll 2020/21

15

176

183

90

137

197

798

Pupil roll 2021/22

15

173

181

85

138

198

790

Pupil roll 2022/23

14

175

178

87

137

196

787

Pupil roll 2023/24

14

173

172

86

135

198

778

Pupil roll 2024/25

13

170

168

83

133

198

765

Pupils from outstanding permissions by 2024/25*

0

16

17

14

18

3

 

Potential pupils from future housing – Local Plan (over 15 yrs)*

0

0

85

0

15

8

 

*Based on 1 primary-aged pupil from every 4 houses

Staff

A separate consultation process, including a staff meeting, will run in parallel with the closure process.

The School Site

The school building and part of the site is owned by the Diocese of Middlesbrough with the remainder owned by the County Council. Decisions about the future use of the school building and playing field will be taken by the owners after the closure proposal has been determined.

What Happens Next?

Your views about this proposal are welcomed.

Complete our online survey

Paper responses should be returned to North Yorkshire County Council at the address below:

Freeport RTKE-RKAY-CUJS
St Hilda’s
Strategic Planning
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
DL7 8AE

The closing date for responses is 14 December 2020

All responses to the consultation received by this date will be considered by the County Council’s Executive on 12 January 2021.

If the County Council’s Executive decides to proceed with the closure proposal, then statutory notices would be published in the local press on Friday 22 January 2021. These notices provide a further four weeks for representations to be made.  A final decision would then be taken by North Yorkshire County Council’s Executive on 9 March 2021.  If agreed the school would close on 9 April 2021.

Key Dates

All dates are subject to approvals at each stage.

Consultation opens

2 November 2020

Virtual Public meeting

24 November 2020 at 7pm

Consultation closes

14 December 2020

County Council’s Executive considers consultation response

12 January 2021

Statutory Notices published (4 weeks for representations to be made)

22 January 2021 to 19 February 2021

Final decision by County Council’s Executive

9 March 2021

Proposed school closure date

9 April 2021

This consultation ended on Friday 22 January 2021.


North Yorkshire County Council has identified the need to establish a new mixed mainstream primary school for children aged 4 to 11 in Northallerton to open in September 2022. We are therefore seeking proposals to establish an academy under section 6A of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 (the ‘free school presumption’). 

Summary of key school information

School’s Characteristic

Description

School type

Mainstream primary

Age range

4-11  Reception to Year 6

Published admission number

30

Size / Capacity

210 places

Gender

Mixed

Opening date

September 2022

Opening profile

First year of operation:  Reception only

Second year:  Reception and Year 1

Adding a further year group for the third year of operation and beyond until full opening is achieved

Admission arrangements       

Oversubscription criteria to be determined by the chosen Academy Trust.

North Yorkshire County Council propose that the new Northallerton School will not have a defined catchment area. Instead priority for admission to the School would be determined by proximity to it.

North Yorkshire County Council propose that the new Northallerton School will not have a defined catchment area. Instead priority for admission to the School would be determined by proximity to it.

Proposers should follow the guidance in the  specification document (pdf / 1 MB) and completed application forms should be returned to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk  by Friday 22 January 2021.

This consultation ended on 22 January 2021


Would your Academy Trust be interested in operating a new primary school for North Yorkshire?

North Yorkshire County Council has identified the need to establish a new mixed mainstream primary school with nursery for children aged 3 to 11 in Knaresborough to open in September 2022. We are therefore seeking proposals to establish an academy under section 6A of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 (the ‘free school presumption’). 

Summary of key school information

School’s Characteristic

Description

School type

Mainstream primary

Age range

3-11  Nursery to Year 6

Published admission number

30

Size / Capacity

210 places

Gender

Mixed

Opening date

September 2022

Opening profile

First year of operation: Nursery and Reception only

Second year: Nursery, Reception and Year 1

Adding a further year group for the third year of operation and beyond until full opening is achieved

Admission arrangements

Oversubscription criteria to be determined by the chosen Academy Trust.

North Yorkshire County Council propose a defined school catchment for the area covered by the Manse Farm and Highfield Farm developments. 

Proposers should follow the guidance in the  specification document (pdf / 692 KB) and completed application forms should be returned to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk by Friday 22 January 2021.

This consultation ended on Wednesday 2 December 2020.


Proposal to close Kell Bank Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School  from 31 August 2021.

There will be virtual public meetings on Tuesday 17 November and Wednesday 2 December 2020 at 7pm

If you wish to be part of this virtual meeting could you please let us know by emailing schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk  and joining instructions will be provided

If you do not have the facilities to participate in a virtual meeting but would still like to engage directly in the consultation process then please could you liaise directly with Kell Bank CE VC Primary School, Healey, Masham, Ripon, North Yorkshire, HG4 4LH (Tel. 01765 689410).

The Current Position

Following discussions and working closely with the Church of England Diocese of Leeds, North Yorkshire County Council is consulting on a proposal to close the school.

The Local Authority has reflected on the school’s position and agree with the conclusion reached by the Governing Body in September 2020 that the school is not viable as a result of a falling pupil roll.

The Local Authority and the Governing Body of Kell Bank Church of England Primary School have not reached this position lightly.

Background

Kell Bank is a Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary school in the Masham area, serving the settlements of Fearby and Healey. The school has worked collaboratively with the Federation of Snape Community and Thornton Watlass CE Primary Schools since 2015. All three schools share the same Executive Headteacher, although Kell Bank has not formally federated with the other two schools and retains a separate governing body. The three schools maximise available opportunities to bring together pupils to share activities and learning opportunities. 

The School was last inspected by Ofsted in October 2013, when there were 45 pupils on roll. The overall effectiveness was judged to be ‘Outstanding’, as were all five contributory judgements. Under the current Ofsted Education Inspection Framework (introduced in September 2019), that level of judgement, given the significant weight on curriculum provision and the low level of pupil numbers at the school, would be difficult to maintain. 

Pupil Numbers

The number of children at Kell Bank CE VC Primary School has been falling over the past few years. At the beginning of September 2019, there were 15 pupils on roll in the school. This was well below the capacity of the school which could accommodate around 50 pupils. The Governing Body and Friends of the School have been active in their collective efforts to raise numbers at the school through many initiatives over recent years. However, since the start of this academic year there has been a further fall in numbers and in September 2020 the school had 6 pupils remaining on roll.

The October 2019 School Census recorded that the majority of primary aged pupils who lived in the school’s catchment area at that time were attending the school (8 pupils attended the school out of a total of 11 pupils who lived in the school’s catchment area). There is unlikely to be any significant new housing in the settlements of Fearby and Healey as they are not Designated Service Villages within the Harrogate District Local Plan.

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Reception

4

5

2

2

3

2

0

Year 1

4

4

5

2

2

3

2

Year 2

7

4

4

2

1

2

2

Year 3

4

5

3

4

2

0

0

Year 4

5

5

5

3

3

3

0

Year 5

6

5

5

5

3

3

0

Year 6

9

5

5

5

5

2

2

Total

39

33

29

23

19

15

6

Forecasts indicate that pupil numbers will not recover in the longer term and may reduce still further.

The Financial Position

Pupil numbers determine the school budget.  With these low numbers, and a reduced budget, the school would have to reduce staff. The school has projected in-year deficits of £17.7k in the financial year 2020/21, £17.5k in 2021/22 and £30k in 2022/23, and cumulative deficits of £2k in 2020/21, £19.5k in 2021/22 and £49.5k in 2022/23. These were based on pupil number assumptions of 16 in 2020/21 and 13 in 2021/22 so the position will be significantly worse now that pupil numbers have fallen and there appears to be no reasonable prospect of recovery.

The Proposal

For the reasons above it is proposed that Kell Bank CE VC Primary School should close with effect from 31 August 2021.

It is also proposed that the catchment area of Masham CE VA Primary School would, in the event of closure, be extended to include the current Kell Bank School catchment area.

Masham is the nearest alternative school to Kell Bank School. Masham School has reached its published admission number in some year groups, although there is capacity in others. The School has a capacity of 116 pupils and a total pupil roll of 121 in September 2020. It is therefore operating around capacity but this is due in part to attendance by pupils who reside in other areas. At the October 2019 census the total roll was 114 pupils of which 43 (37%) came from outside of the school’s catchment area. At the same time there were 85 primary aged pupils living in the catchment area of Masham School and 11 primary aged children living in the catchment area of Kell Bank School. The conclusion is that Masham CE Primary School would be the appropriate choice to adopt the existing Kell Bank catchment area as an addition to its existing area in the event of a closure.

The County Council would welcome views regarding this catchment area proposal as part of this consultation.

Other local schools

For children currently at Kell Bank CE VC Primary School, North Yorkshire County Council will work with each family to try to meet their individual preferences for other schools. Staff and governors at Kell Bank CE VC Primary School are also committed to supporting families in their choice of school and in making a smooth transition in the event of closure.

Other primary schools in the local area are:

  • Masham Church of England (Voluntary Aided) Primary School, 1 Millgate, Market Place, Masham, Ripon, North Yorkshire, HG4 4EG
  • Grewelthorpe Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, Cross Hills, Grewelthorpe, Ripon, North Yorkshire, HG4 3BH
  • St Nicholas, Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, West Tanfield, Ripon HG4 5JN
  • Thornton Watlass Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, Thornton Watlass, Ripon, North Yorkshire, HG4 4AH
  • Kirkby Malzeard Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, Church Street, Kirkby Malzeard, Ripon, North Yorkshire, HG4 3RT
  • Snape Community Primary School, Ings Lane, Snape, Bedale, North Yorkshire, DL8 2TF
  • Fountains Earth Lofthouse Church of England Endowed (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, Fountains Earth, Lofthouse, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, HG3 5RZ

All these schools were judged ‘Good’ at their last Ofsted inspection.

Parents have a right to express a preference for any school. The Local Authority is the admissions authority for community and voluntary controlled schools and will meet that preference provided there are vacant places, or the school is happy to admit above the published admission number.  In the case of Voluntary Aided schools, the governing body decides the conditions for admission to their particular school. Some schools may be able to admit over their published admission numbers for some year groups.

Eligibility for home-to-school transport will be determined in line with the County Council’s current home-to-school transport policy and procedures, based on travel distances from each child’s home address and individual circumstances. 

Where a child attends a school, which is not their normal school or nearest school, parents are normally responsible for making transport arrangements.  

North Yorkshire County Council’s Admissions Team is always happy to give advice to parents – please contact Karen Crossland on 01609 534825 or Lisa Herdman on 01609 534953.

Primary School places in the local area September 2020


School

Distance by road from Kell Bank  School (miles)

Reception

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Total on roll

Kell Bank CE

N/A

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

6

Masham CE

2.8

Places

Places

PAN

PAN

Places

PAN

Places

121

Grewelthorpe CE

5.8

PAN

Places

PAN

Places

PAN

PAN

PAN

75

St Nicholas West Tanfield CE VC

6.1

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

36

Thornton Watlass CE

6.7

Places

Places

Places

Places

PAN

Places

Places

27

Kirkby Malzeard CE

7.2

Places

PAN

Places

Places

PAN

PAN

Places

85

Snape Community

7.5

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

24

Fountains Earth Lofthouse

7.9

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

16

Middleham CE VA

11.2 via

Main Road

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

45

Spennithorne CE VC

11.3 via Main Road

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

28

PAN = School year group is at published admission number, all applications will be dealt with on an individual basis and Admissions Team will have discussions with appropriate Headteacher to see if the school are in a position to admit additional pupils in that year group.

Pupil number projections, including future demand from housing developments

Swipe or scroll to view full table.

 

Masham CE

  VA

Grewelthorpe  CE VC

St Nicholas West Tanfield CE VC

Thornton Watlass CE VC

 

Kirkby Malzeard CE VC

Snape Community Primary School

Fountains Earth Lofthouse CE Endowed

Middleham

CE VA

Spennithorne CE VC

 

 

Federated with Fountains CE School, Grantley, Ripon 

Federated with Kirby Malzeard

Federated with Snape

Federated with St Nicholas, West Tanfield

Federated with Thornton Watlass

Federated with St Cuthberts, Pateley Bridge

Federated with Spennithorne CE

Federated with Middleham CE VA

Distance from Kell Bank School by road (miles)

2.8

5.8

6.1

6.7

7.2 via Thorpe Road

7.5

7.9

9 miles via Ellingstring & 11.2 via main road 

11.3 via main road

Last Ofsted inspection

Good

July 2019

Good

March 2017

Good

 March 2019

Good

November 2017

Good

March 2018

Good

May 2018

Good

April 2017

Requires Improvement

November 2018

Requires Improvement

May 2019

Net Capacity

(total places at the school)

116

70

70

51

105

52

42

78

83

Current pupil roll 20/21

121

75

36

27

85

24

16

45

28

Current capacity

-/+

-5

-5

34

24

20

28

26

33

55

Pupil roll 2021/22

126

73

37

25

84

27

14

46

29

Pupil roll 2022/23

124

66

32

25

81

26

14

50

30

Pupil roll 2023/24

125

60

31

21

78

25

13

51

30

Pupil roll 2024/25

122

59

28

21

82

27

12

55

29

Pupil roll 2025/26

119

56

28

20

79

27

13

51

29

Potential additional pupils from housing *

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils from outstanding permissions by 2025/26

17

1

12

1

13

1

2

4

2

Potential pupils from future housing – Local Plan (over 15 yrs)

12

0

3

0

12

0

0

0

0

*Based on 1 primary-aged pupil from every 4 houses

Staff

A separate staff consultation process will run in parallel with the consultation on the closure proposal.

The Building

The Diocese have confirmed that the school site, other than the playing field, is vested in the Diocesan Board of Finance. The playing field is owned by the County Council. Decisions about the future use of the school site and buildings will be taken by the owners after the closure proposal has been determined.

What Happens Next?

Your views about this proposal are welcomed.

Complete our survey

The closing date for responses is 21 December 2020

All responses to the consultation received by this date will be considered by the County Council’s Executive on 26 January 2021.

If the County Council’s Executive decides to proceed with the closure proposal, then statutory notices would be published in the local press on 5 February 2021. These notices provide a further four weeks for representations to be made. A final decision would then be made by North Yorkshire County Council’s Executive Committee on 23 March 2021.  If agreed the school would close on 31 August 2021.

Key Dates

All dates subject to approval at each stage.

Consultation opens

2 November  2020

Virtual Public meeting

17 November 2020 at 7pm

Virtual Public meeting

2 December 2020 at 7pm

Consultation closes

21 December 2020

County Council’s Executive considers consultation responses

26 January 2021

Statutory Notices published (4 weeks for representations to be made)

5 February 2021 to 5 March 2021

Final decision by County Council’s Executive

23 March 2021

Proposed school closure date

31 August 2021

This consultation ended on Monday 11 January 2021


We want North Yorkshire to be a thriving county, which adapts to a changing world and remains a special place for everyone to live, work and visit. We also want to prioritise economic growth and invest in the rollout of superfast broadband so that everyone has good access to digital services.

The financial challenges we are facing are set to continue. Our finances have reduced, but demand for our services has increased. Particular pressures include Covid-19 response and recovery, roads, supporting adults and older people who need help to live independently and helping to make sure children and young people have the best possible start in life.

To help shape our council plan and annual budget we want your views on which of our priorities matter most to you. By taking part in this consultation, you will help us decide how we focus our resources in very challenging and uncertain times.

Council plan

The council plan sets out our priorities and actions for the next four years. It includes our key ambitions and explains how we intend to deliver services that meet the needs of people in North Yorkshire.

The council plan sets out our vision and values and describes a three pronged approach - to provide leadership, enable individuals, families and communities to do the best for themselves, and to ensure the delivery of our own high quality services.

To achieve this, the plan identifies five key ambitions:

Ambitions

Supporting outcomes

Leading for North Yorkshire

A confident North Yorkshire championing the case for a fairer share of resources for our communities.

Working with partners and local communities to improve health and economic outcomes for North Yorkshire.

Resilient, resourceful and confident communities co-producing with the County Council.

Every child and young person has the best possible start in life

A healthy start to life with safe and healthy lifestyles.

Education as our greatest liberator with high aspirations, opportunities and achievements.

A happy family life in strong families and vibrant communities.

Every adult has a longer, healthier and independent life

People are safe, with individuals, organisations and communities all playing a part in preventing, identifying and reporting neglect or abuse. 

People have control and choice in relation to their health, independence and social care support. 

People can access good public health services and social care across our different communities.

North Yorkshire is a place with a strong economy & a commitment to sustainable growth

A larger business base and increased number of good quality jobs in North Yorkshire.

People across the county have equal access to economic opportunities

Increased overall average median wage

Innovative and forward thinking Council

Easy and effective access to County Council services.

Challenging ourselves to change, innovate and deliver value for money support services to improve the customer experience.

A motivated and agile workforce working efficiently and effectively to drive innovation.

Operating on a commercial basis, where this is prudent and appropriate, to deliver a return which supports service delivery to those most in need.

See the full council plan here.

We are currently refreshing our council plan for 2021 to 2025.

Longer term plans

A devolution deal for York and North Yorkshire could potentially unlock around £2.4bn of investment over 30 years, with a focus on improving the economic prosperity and future long-term opportunities for all residents through significant investment in transport, broadband, skills and climate change initiatives. 

To be eligible to bid for a devolution deal, the County Council submitted a proposal to government for a single council for North Yorkshire. This would bring together the services currently provided by North Yorkshire County Council, Craven District Council, Hambleton District Council, Harrogate Borough Council, Richmondshire District Council, Ryedale District Council, Scarborough Borough Council and Selby District Council. This would make sizeable savings of £30-67m per year and would deliver improved services in the longer term. 

We are committed to gaining a devolution deal as soon as possible to generate significant funding for the county at a critical moment as we drive economic recovery post-pandemic and to allow more decisions to be made locally by, and for, the people who live and work here.

Find out more about our proposal new unitary council.

Budget

North Yorkshire County Council, like most local authorities, has faced a very challenging financial environment in the last 10 years with significant reductions in government funding but increasing demand. As a result, the county council’s spending power has reduced by more than a third over the last decade. 

If this wasn’t difficult enough there is, of course, the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. We estimate that coronavirus will cost the council an additional £82m this year, taking into account extra essential expenditure and lost income.  This includes outbreak management, test and trace, providing information and support, funding the voluntary sector to support people with shopping, collecting prescriptions and making befriending calls, provision of grants for voluntary organisations, food vouchers, contacting those who were shielding and providing transport for medical appointments.

There have already been significant reductions in council tax and business rates income because of the pandemic and we anticipate that these will continue into the longer term. These are unprecedented and uncertain times.

Despite already making significant savings, we face the prospect of having to take yet more difficult decisions about balancing the council’s finances whilst still protecting key services. As part of this, we want to hear your thoughts about how you think we should manage and prioritise our finances.

Where does the council's money come from?

Our funding comes from four main areas: Council tax, charges to users and similar income, central government grants and business rates.

  • A little under half (47%) of our income is from council tax.
  • Fees, charges and other income make up 26%. These are things we specifically charge for such as parking or care home fees.
  • Allocated government grants and joint funding (e.g. from the NHS) is money we receive that has to be spent on the specific thing it was intended for and makes up 17%.
  • Our business rates give us 10% of our income.

What is the money spent on?

Health and adult services

Older people

£123m

Young adults – learning disabilities

£91m

Other young adults

£29m

Public health

£22m

Other

£6m

Children and young people’s services

Children’s social care

£44m

Home to school transport

£28m

Education support and other

£18m

Special educational needs

£14m

Business and environmental services

Waste

£51m

Highways

£39m

Concessionary fares

£9m

Planning, trading standards, economic development

£8m

Transport fleet

£7m

Public transport

£3m

In addition we have £76m of capital funding that we use to carry out longer term repairs to roads and bridges.

Other

 

Organisational support

£54m

Capital financing

£24m

Customer, communities, libraries

£16m

Property costs

£13m

Others

£24m

The medium-term financial strategy sets out how resources will be put in place to support the delivery of the council plan and to enable priorities and service objectives to be achieved. The strategy can be found on pages 43 to 145 of the executive report to the council appendices booklet.

Savings so far

By the end of the 2020-21 financial year, we will have made revenue savings of around £178m. Focusing our savings on increasing our own efficiency has helped us to keep the impact on front line services to a minimum, but the more we need to save, the more difficult this becomes. Almost three quarters of the savings to date have come from efficiency savings (£136m), including:

£57m - Improved ways of working

£29m - Reducing costs of buying goods and services

£20m - Reductions in support services, back office and administrative support

£21m - Increased income from selling services to schools and other councils

£6m - Reductions in the number of managers

£3m - Reductions in staff terms and conditions

We have tried to protect frontline services and only around a quarter of savings (£42m) so far have come from frontline services. These have included:

  • changes to library services with many now being run by community groups;
  • replacing elderly persons’ homes with extra care housing to better meet the needs of older people, supporting them to retain their independence;
  • changing to a model of providing targeted support to children and young people while reducing the number of children’s centres;
  • public transport; or
  • changes to grass-cutting services.

We need to find a further £103m over the next three years to meet the remaining funding gap. This will be extremely challenging but we are working on plans and proposals.

We have submitted a proposal for a single North Yorkshire Council to make significant savings and improve services but also to unlock around £2.4bn of investment from a devolution deal for York and North Yorkshire. Find out more about our proposal for a new unitary council.

This consultation ended on 4 January 2021


Introduction

North Yorkshire is home to 130,000 children and young people.

Ensuring a good start in life is a shared goal for all parents, families and communities, as well as for the local organisations responsible for health, education, childcare and welfare.

There is an African proverb that it takes a village to raise a child and that is as true in North Yorkshire as it is around the world. Many people play a part in enabling babies, children and young people to grow and develop at key milestones in their lives. North Yorkshire is a good place in which to live as a child or young person, with a good range of childcare provision, high performing schools and well-recognised health and care services for those children, young people and parents who need extra support.

North Yorkshire County Council, in partnership with Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust, is proposing a new model for the Healthy Child Programme (which currently comprises Health Visiting and School Nursing Services) in the county. We want to hear your views about our proposals and how they can be implemented.

The Healthy Child Programme, which supports children and young people aged 0-19 and their families, is one service amongst many. It offers both universal services (services that every child and family should get, such as the new born visit at 10-14 days) for all children, young people and families and targeted help for those most in need.

Proposals

  • We propose intensifying our focus on children under 5, based on the evidence that supporting them has a greater impact throughout life, gives them the best start in life and prepares them to be ready to learn.
  • We want to secure longer term funding and certainty for the Healthy Child Programme in North Yorkshire, within the context of the national reduction in Public Health Grant which is the main source of funding for the service.
  • We propose extending and developing the partnership between North Yorkshire County Council and Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust (HDFT), to provide the service for a period of up to ten years, taking us to 2031.
  • We want to learn from the emergency changes made to the current service during the response to Covid-19.
  • We propose implementing a new service model as a result of all of the above factors.

Our commitments

In putting these proposals forward, we are making clear pledges to you.

  • All children and young people will receive universal and targeted services to enable them to have the best start in life, through our work in children’s ‘early help’ and social care, schools and community support for children and young people with additional needs. ‘Early help’ provides support when need is identified at any point in a child’s life. It is not a specific service but a joined up approach across all service providers to work with children, young people and families to prevent the need for statutory/costly interventions.
  • We will prioritise our public health grant-funded Healthy Child Programme towards children under five, to support their early development and to ensure that they are ready to learn.
  • All new-born babies and their parent(s)/carer(s) will have a face-to-face visit from a qualified Health Visitor.
  • We will continue to provide targeted support for 5-19 year olds, through a range of different programmes and services.
  • Our Healthy Child 0-19 services will combine a mix of face-to-face, online, individual and group work services, tailored to the personal circumstances of each family.
  • We will continue to work with children and families, local service providers in the public and private sector, and voluntary and community groups to ensure that the right support is provided by the right person and at the right time.

What is the Healthy Child Programme?

The Healthy Child Programme is a national health promotion and early support programme for children, young people and their families. It aims to bring together health, education and other partners to deliver an effective programme of services and support. There is a mandatory requirement to provide some elements of the programme.

The programme is currently comprised of the following services.

  • An evidence-based approach for the delivery of public health services to families with children aged 0-5, led by Health Visitors.
  • Early intervention and prevention public health programmes for children and young people aged 5-19 and their families. These build on the pregnancy to 0-5 service and are led by school nurses.

Since the transfer of Public Health services to councils in April 2013, the Healthy Child Programme has been paid for by local government, under the direction of the Director of Public Health. Most councils, but not all, have worked with an NHS partner to provide the service. In North Yorkshire, until now, Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust has provided separate services for children aged 0-5 and 5-19.

How is the service provided currently?

The current service can be summarised as follows.

0-5 Years - Health visiting 5-19 Years - School nursing

5 mandatory health reviews

  • Antenatal (28 weeks) check: Health promoting visit
  • 10-14 days after birth: New baby review
  • 6-8 weeks old: 6-8 week assessment
  • 9-12 months old: One year assessment
  • 2-2½ years old (two to two-and a half-year integrated review)

A range of services and support given to families.

5 Health reviews

  • 4-5 year old health needs assessment
  • 10-11 year-old health needs assessment
  • Screening service
    • National Child Measurement Programme which measures the height and weight of children and brief advice given to families if child is overweight or obese (mandatory requirement)
    • Vision and hearing screening at school entry
  • Support for emotional wellbeing and resilience and  reducing risk-taking in young people.

As such, the Healthy Child Programme forms part of a comprehensive network of children and young people’s services commissioned and provided by North Yorkshire County Council, the NHS and other partners in the county. It means that there is an extensive range of support for all children, young people and their families, as well as extra help for those who need it most. Many of the children’s services provided by North Yorkshire County Council and Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust are rated by the regulators, Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission, as outstanding or good.

The range and quality of children and young people’s services in the county puts North Yorkshire in a relatively good position when public services are faced with significant cuts in the funding they receive from Central Government. In this case, we are facing a year on year cut of up to £4 million in the Public Health Grant for North Yorkshire.

It is within this context that the County Council is proposing changes to the Healthy Child Programme, with a view to making savings while ensuring that all children continue to have the best start in life and have access to the right support as they grow into adulthood.

Why are we proposing to change the service?

There are three main reasons why we are proposing to change the current service.

The national Public Health Grant is being reduced.

This means that North Yorkshire will lose up to £4 million funding and all Public Health programmes will have to make savings as a consequence. Indeed, some will stop altogether. These proposals, alongside investment in children and young people’s emotional and mental well-being and services to reduce drug and alcohol misuse, mean that a third of the Public Health Grant available to the County will continue to be spent on children and young people. This translates to 33% of Public Health Grant being spent on children and young people who constitute about 22% of the North Yorkshire population.

The savings from the Healthy Child Programme budget is £750,000 over three years.

Our priority is to focus on children aged under five

The foundations of a healthy life are set in early childhood and in North Yorkshire we wish to prioritise investment in children aged 0-5 years in order to ensure they have the best start in life.  In the context of the reduction in the Public Health Grant, the council seeks to secure this through a long term funding arrangement for the Healthy Child Programme for a period of up to 10 years.  There is evidence that indicates a focus on 0-5 years does not only support improving health outcomes, but improves wider societal and economic outcomes. National policy related to providing the best start in life provides further evidence that increasing investment in children aged 0-5 years can impact on childhood obesity, emotional wellbeing and school readiness. Improvements in these areas will in turn support lifelong positive outcomes.

The universal elements of the Healthy Child Programme identify children and families who are at risk of poor outcomes and who are in need of additional support.  Focussing assessment on children aged 0-5 means the most vulnerable families can be provided with additional support at the earliest opportunity. Health visitors and their teams are skilled practitioners who build parental confidence and can ensure families receive early help before problems develop further. This approach can not only improve the life chances of the child but should reduce demand for higher cost specialist services as the child grows older and, later, in adult life.

We have learned from how services have operated under Covid-19 restrictions

The pandemic has changed how we deliver the current service for the long-term. The profound impact of the virus on society and on public services means that people have been using services differently and some staff have developed new roles and skills. As national lockdown is easing, the current service is recovering but it will never return to the pre-Covid-19 status because of the emergency changes we implemented. This consultation is proposing to learn from the service that has been provided during the Covid-19 pandemic. For example, many families have given feedback saying that access to advice over the telephone, on face time or online has been really helpful to them.

The service will use tools that have been shown to be effective in identifying and measuring risks to assess family need and risk, and ensure that families most in need receive face-to-face contacts.

What will the proposed new service look like?

Most parents and carers can confidently support their child’s development, but some experience challenges that can make this task more difficult. Factors such as poor mental health, financial hardship or ongoing conflict in a relationship all influence parents’ ability to provide a nurturing environment for their child. There are a range of health promotion activities, support and practices which have good evidence of improving outcomes for children, by working directly with children themselves and helping parents or practitioners to support children’s development.

The new service will focus on health promotion activities and early support. It will be an integrated 0-19 service that brings together many aspects of what is currently provided by the health visiting (0-5) and School Nursing (5-19) services. We will continue to provide all of the mandatory elements of the service for all age groups. For a small number of families, this may be through a virtual or digital offer. There will be universal and targeted provision with a focus on families with children under the age of five, delivered by appropriately trained, skilled teams. This approach will be an important way of providing children and young people with the skills and resilience they need to achieve a variety of important positive health and wellbeing effects, including increased physical and mental wellbeing, educational attainment, and reduced youth crime and anti-social behaviour.

The new service will build on learning about how services have operated under Covid-19 restrictions, introducing a blended approach of face-to-face and online contact for families, based on robust assessment of the child and family’s needs; Families and young people have engaged with services in a way that is relevant and appropriate to their needs and staff have developed new skills to support them in doing so. For example, some people have opted to get extra support online, including peer support from, and group work with, other families.

For under 5s, the proposals prioritise infant feeding and family diet and nutrition and childrens’ readiness to learn as areas for improvement in the new service. For children and young people aged 5-19, the proposals prioritise emotional health and resilience and risk taking behaviour as areas for improvement in the new service. This will allow greater integration of the NHS-led Healthy Child Programme with the County Council’s Children and Young People’s Service and other relevant services across health and social care.

The new service will be delivered through a partnership between North Yorkshire County Council and Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust, using what’s called a Section 75 Agreement (which gives powers to local authorities to delegate the provision of services to an NHS Foundation Trust). There will be a separate 30-day public consultation on the partnership agreement in the winter of 2020/2021.

How will the new service be different from the current service?

The proposed new service is significantly different from the current service in a number of ways. It will continue to deliver universal services for all families and will also allow for resources to be targeted to those most in need. Protecting children at risk of harm and those in need remains the top priority.

The main changes are as follows.

  • All new babies will have a face-to-face visit from a Health Visitor, and follow up visits will be either face-to-face or online, depending on the family’s needs and identified risks.
  • Services will be provided face-to-face or virtually dependent on family need and identified risks.
  • All contacts with children under one year will be undertaken by a qualified health visitor.
  •  Contacts with families with a child over one year old will be delivered by a skilled team under the direction of a health visitor. This approach will allow for a co-ordinated and integrated approach in responding to needs.
  • Some of the services provided to school aged children (5-19) such as vision and hearing screening, and advice and support about daytime and night time wetting for school age children will not be provided.
  • Support for emotional wellbeing and resilience and in reducing risk taking in young people will be enhanced.
  • We are working closely with local partners (Families, Clinical Commissioning Groups, Primary Care, NHS Hospitals, Voluntary Organisations and Community Groups) to ensure that children and families are supported to access alternative services, for the aspects of the current service that will no longer be delivered with the new service.  We will ensure that children, young people and families and the wider public have the information on how to access alternative services and support.

What does our equality impact assessment say?

We have carried out an equality impact assessment (EIA).

Equality impact assessments ensure that our policies, services and legislation do not discriminate against anyone and that, where possible, we promote equality of opportunity.

We will update this following comments received during the consultation and the North Yorkshire County Council Executive and the Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust Board will consider it again before a final decision is made on implementing the new service. The EIA has identified that there will be an impact on children and young people receiving some aspects of the service that will no longer be provided and we will offer support to families to adapt to those changes.  The strength of North Yorkshire’s full range of children and young people’s services will help families to get the support that they need.

We anticipate that, if these proposals are implemented, the new service will have a positive impact for children, young people and their families, particularly as there will be a single, more integrated 0-19 service across the county which will lead to a more responsive service for children and families. However, we recognise that aspects of the current service delivery model will not be delivered and the partnership will carry out an analysis of the gaps in services to be fully aware of potential risks.

A combination of face-to-face, online and group based service delivery can increase and improve how children and families can be supported. We anticipate that by making joint decisions with families, health and social care providers and schools, the right care and support will be available in a timely manner and that, by greater joint working, we will increase and improve how children and families are supported.

How to have your say on these proposals

We want to hear your views on the proposals and, in particular on the following three questions:

  1. In the context of a national reduction in North Yorkshire’s Public Health Grant of up to £4 million in the next few years, do you support the proposals to prioritise children under 5, and their families, so that they have the best start in life?
  2. In the context of a national reduction in North Yorkshire’s Public Health Grant of up to £4 million in the next few years, do you support the proposals for 5-19 year olds which are focussed on,
    • supporting vulnerable young people
    • developing a service to help young people improve their emotional resilience and wellbeing.

How would you see that support being provided to children and young people?

  1. We have learned from how we had to adapt during the Covid-19 pandemic, and in future, we want to deliver some of the Healthy Child Programme online and via the telephone.

How do you think digital and telephone services could help support families in North Yorkshire?

Answer these questions, tell us your views and give us your suggestions

This survey has now closed.

See an easy read version of this consultation.

Online events

You can also register for an online event to hear about our proposals and ask questions:

Date

Time

Register

3 November 2020

10:30

This event has passed.

5 November 2020

13:30

This event has passed.

6 November 2020

10:30

This event has passed.

17 November 2020

10:30

This event has passed.

18 November 2020

18:00

This event has passed.

19 November 2020

13:30

This event has passed.

Unfortunately, due to Covid-19 restrictions, it is unlikely that we will be able to host face-to-face events during this consultation

How long is the consultation?

This will be a 10-week consultation beginning on Monday 26 October 2020 and ending on Monday 4 January 2021 The feedback received will be presented to NYCC and HDFT Executives, and subject to the outcome of the consultation it is anticipated the new service will be in place on 1 April 2021.

What happens after the consultation closes?

The responses received during this public consultation will be considered by North Yorkshire County Council’s Executive, as well as its Scrutiny of Health Committee, and by Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust Board, before any final decision is made.

Subject to the outcome of this consultation and due consideration, it is proposed that the new service will begin on 1 April 2021.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is this public consultation about?

This consultation is about the proposals for an integrated 0-19 Healthy Child Service, which includes Health Visiting (0-5) and School Aged (5-19) services, and the proposed new model for delivery of the mandated contacts and targeted support for families.

What is the Healthy Child Programme?

The Healthy Child Programme is a national public health programme for children, young people and their families. It aims to bring together health, education and other partners to deliver an effective programme of early intervention, prevention and support. There is a statutory requirement for the Council to provide some elements of the programme.

NHS health visitors lead the delivery of public health services and support to families, from pregnancy to children aged 0-5.

School nurses lead some of the public health services and support for children, young people (aged 5-19) and their families.

Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust currently provides the Healthy Child Programme in North Yorkshire.

Why a new service model is being proposed?

The national Public Health Grant in North Yorkshire has reduced by up to £4 million. As a result, North Yorkshire County Council will have to make savings across all Public Health programmes. Some programmes have stopped or will stop.

In the context of the reduction in Public Health Grant, we are prioritising children aged 0-5. This is based on the evidence that increasing investment in children during their early years can positively affect many areas of a child’s life, which in turn support lifelong positive outcomes.

We have also prioritised support for vulnerable young people and emotional resilience and wellbeing in children and young people.

Protecting children at risk of harm and those in need remains the top priority for the programme.

We are looking to continue our relationship with Harrogate and District Foundation Trust for a longer term of up to 10 years. This will provide the opportunity to transform the way we provide services to children and families, and help closely align the programme with the Early Help Service run by the County Council’s Children and Young People’s Service, as well as other health services and community support.

How will vulnerable children and young people be supported?

There will be no significant change to the health visitors’ role in local safeguarding procedures and processes.

The School Aged (5-19) Safeguarding Model includes a team aligned with the North Yorkshire Multi-Agency Screening Team (MAST) to support safeguarding procedures where it is deemed appropriate for the service to be engaged beyond the initial strategy meeting. The new model for children and young people aged 5-19 includes a specialist team of nurses to support children subject to a child protection plan and children who are looked after. The model adheres to the North Yorkshire Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Practices.

What difference will the new service model make to children, young people and families?

Every family with a child under 5 years will receive the five mandatory health reviews. The service will aim to deliver on 100% of contacts with a focus on face to face delivery for key contacts (the five health reviews detailed in the table in the ‘How is this service provided currently’ section) and families identified as requiring face to face/ home visits through a robust Family Health Needs Assessment. Some contacts will be carried out using virtual methods based on robust risk assessment.

However, because of the reduction in Public Health grant and the focus on children under 5, the programme will not be able to provide the level of service that has previously been provided to school aged children (5-19). Some of the services that have stopped or will stop include:

  • Hearing and vision screening at school entry
  • Perinatal mental health listening visits (support for women who may experience anxiety and depression during pregnancy and after childbirth)
  • Drop-ins in schools – to offer advice and support on health and wellbeing issues (e.g. children with asthma and sexual health support)
  • Level 1 continence support (advice and support about daytime and night time wetting) for school age children
  • Sexual health services
  • Sign off school health care plans
  • School entry and Year 6 health questionnaires

How will I get support for the services that are stopping?

The Healthy Child Programme is only one source of support and information for children and families, and they are often in contact with many services and agencies. The proposals present the opportunity for closer working between the programme and other health and social services and community support, to ensure support that meets the individual needs of children, young people and families.

We are therefore working together to develop systems and processes that will enable families and young people to access the support they need. Some of these are explained below.

Families with children under 5 years

Will I still have a named health visitor?

Every family with a child under 5 years will have a named health visitor.

Will all child health clinics close? How will babies be weighed?

Well Baby Clinics will not be offered as part of the proposed model. Babies will be weighed in line with the recommendations in the Healthy Child Programme for example when targeted support is required to support with infant feeding or where babies need targeted support to monitor development.

The service will assess community need and use venues to provide group support to meet the needs of the local population. For example, group activities to support breast feeding or maternal mental health/ perinatal mental health and attachment.

How will perinatal mental health concerns be identified and supported if perinatal mental health listening visits no longer take place?

The Health Visitor will identify maternal mental health needs through the Family Health Needs Assessment and assessment of risk factors. Targeted support may be provided through listening visits (support for women who may experience anxiety and depression during pregnancy and after childbirth) or group activity or signposting to online support and activities.

How will young parents be supported?

Young parents will continue to be considered a vulnerable group and will receive all five mandated contacts and targeted support when required.

Children and young people (5-19)

Will my school have a named school nurse?

No, there will not be capacity in the 5-19 workforce to provide a named school nurse for each school. The service will develop online support available to schools. The emotional health and resilience team will provide targeted support to children and young people at Tier 1 Children and Adolescent Mental Health Service level (early support for children and young people with low level emotional and mental health issues).

What will happen if parents have concerns about their child’s hearing?

Hearing will be considered at all 0-5 health reviews. At any point health visitors can refer direct to audiology for a hearing test. We are also developing ways that will enable professionals (e.g. teachers and GPs) to refer children with hearing problems to hospital audiology services for a hearing test. 

What will happen if parents have concerns about their child’s vision?

Routine eye checks are offered to newborn babies and young children to identify any problems early. Free NHS sight tests are also available at opticians for children under 16 and for young people under 19 in full-time education.

Who will sign off school health care plans for children and young people with managed asthma, epilepsy and diabetes?

There is not a formal requirement for health care plans to be “signed off” by a health professional. However, the health professional overseeing the child’s care would be asked to input into the plan. This can be any health professional and would only be a school nurse if they are overseeing the child's care

Who will provide continence support (advice and support about daytime and night time wetting) for school age children?

We are developing ways that families can access the information they need to self-manage these conditions at the level 1 (low level) stage.

Who will provide sexual health advice and support?

The Council will continue to support the delivery of quality Personal, Social and Health Education (PHSE) and implementation of statutory relationships and sex education (SRE) in schools.  The service will provide effective signposting to local sexual health services.

Monthly GP liaison will stop and will be delivered differently. What does this mean?

The current process for GP liaison about children, young people and families will be reviewed. We will discuss how the health visiting and school nursing services liaise with practices in partnership with GPs once the new model is agreed.

Glossary

Local organisations

A local organisation is an organisation which delivers services or activities in a particular area. For us this means within the North Yorkshire boundary in one or all of the 7 local district or borough areas.

Universal services

Services that every child and family should get for example the new born visit at 10-14 days.

Targeted services

Services that are for people with specific needs, for example the emotional and mental wellbeing service for young people.

Early help

Early Help provides support when need is identified at any point in a child’s life. It is not a specific service but a joined up approach across all service providers to work with children, young people and families to prevent the need for statutory/costly interventions.

Public sector agencies

Public sector agencies are organisations which deliver Government provided services such as North Yorkshire County and District Councils or partners such as Harrogate District Foundation Trust

Evidence based approach

An approach where research has proven that services and support work well. This approach helps us to agree what to carry on doing and what to change.

Evidence based tools

Evidence based tools can be things like questionnaires, interviews, observations, risk assessments. These tools can help us to identify what works well and what does not.

Commissioned services

This is where the local authority (e.g. NYCC) has asked and appointed a provider to deliver a particular service. For example, NYCC has commissioned HDFT to provide parts of the Healthy Child Programme like health visiting and school nursing services.

Outcomes

We want any services we provide to be able to support you and your child to have a healthy start. This is an ‘outcome’ of the service commissioned.

Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs)

CCGs are groups of general practices (GPs) which come together in each area to commission the best services for their patients and population.

Primary care

This is the first point of contact with the health care system. Primary care includes general practice, community pharmacy, dental, and optometry (eye health) services.

Gap analysis

An analysis of the gaps in services, which should include what needs to be done to address them.

Mandated contacts

Mandatory visits that every family with a child under five receives from the health visitor to carry out health reviews. 

Key mandated contacts/visits

  • Antenatal (28 weeks) check: health promoting visit
  • 10-14 days after birth: new baby review
  • 6-8 weeks old: 6-8 week assessment
  • 9-12 months old: one year assessment
  • 2-2½ years old (two to two-and a half-year integrated review)

Child Protection Plan

This is a plan made after a child has been the subject of a Child Protection case conference.

Local safeguarding procedures and processes

These are guidelines and activities that explain what the council will do to keep children and young people safe.

Tier 1 services

Early support for children and young people with low level emotional and mental health issues.

This consultation ended on 23 October


We are consulting on a proposal to establish a new mainstream primary school, to primarily serve the North Northallerton Development Area. The proposed new school will also support general school place sufficiency in Northallerton.

It is intended that the new school will be a free school (a state-funded school, operating as an academy, independent of the local authority) in accordance with Department for Education guidance.

The age range of the school will be 4-11, providing places for 210 pupils (one form of entry) with the ability to expand to 420 places (two forms of entry) should that be required in the future. The school will provide places for boys and girls (mixed). 

The expected opening date is September 2022.

Background

The North Northallerton Development Area (NNDA) covers approximately 50 hectares and is identified as the strategic site for development and growth in Northallerton.

The NNDA is expected to contain 859 houses, running in a northern band between Stokesley Road and Darlington Road. Development has started, leaving 649 dwellings to be completed and occupied. The latest indications are that a build rate of 120 dwellings per year is expected

Hambleton’s Local Plan has been revised and a further 670 houses are being added to the east of the existing NNDA. This forms part of c.1380 dwellings which, it is proposed, are to be constructed in Northallerton in the medium to long-term:

Site name

Expected no. of dwellings

Status

Multiple sites

65

Planning permission granted – several small sites at various stages

North Northallerton

646

Planning permission granted – under construction

Multiple sites

671

 

Local Plan sites – planning permission not yet granted

Since existing housing in Northallerton is concentrated to the south of the town, the existing schools in Northallerton are also clustered in the south. These schools are becoming increasingly full as primary pupil numbers are now rising alongside housing growth.

School

Type of School

Alverton Primary

Community School

Applegarth Primary

Community School

Brompton Community Primary

Community School

Broomfield

Community School

Mill Hill Community Primary

Community School

Romanby Primary

Community School

Sacred Heart RC Primary

Academy

The above schools are collectively close to their operational capacity and there are limited opportunities to expand these schools further.

The effects of the pandemic on the rate of house building and the housing market generally is not yet known. There is therefore potential that, having commenced the required process, NYCC may subsequently decide that September 2022 ceases to be the desired opening date. The situation will be kept under review.

Demand for a new school site

It is considered that a new school site should be developed to serve the immediate growth area formed by the NNDA, and also support general school place sufficiency in Northallerton for the medium to long-term.

The impact of all of the planned housing could not be met by expanding existing school sites in Northallerton. A significant portion of the NNDA falls into the catchment area for Applegarth Primary School. Applegarth School is landlocked by housing and therefore has no scope for expansion.  This was a key factor in the initial consideration of whether Northallerton’s existing primary schools could be expanded, or whether a new school would be required. 

Along with Applegarth, the NNDA also falls into the catchment areas of Alverton and Brompton Primary Schools. There is now an upward trend in pupil numbers at primary phase, particularly in younger age groups, which will increase pressure on school places across the town.  As a result, it is anticipated that by 2022/23 Applegarth, Brompton, Alverton and Romanby Primary Schools will all reach their capacity.

On the basis of the current forecasts including extra pupils arising from housing, it is anticipated that a new school site would be needed from September 2022 onwards (see proposed school location).  The projected shortfall of places would continue to rise, largely due to the impacts of new housing, from 2023 onwards without the introduction of additional provision.

It is assumed that the new school would initially open for Reception pupils only. The second year of opening would see Reception and Year 1 pupils accommodated, adding a further year group for the third year and beyond until a full roll of 210 is achieved. This is quite a common opening profile for newly established schools and helps to avoid destabilising existing provision.

There is no proposal for nursery provision on site, although it could be included in any future expansion to 2 form entry should that become necessary. Northallerton already has a wide range of childcare providers who offer childcare and education for children from birth to five.  This is offered through a mixed model of provision and includes 8 private nurseries offering full day care and most of whom also offer out of school provision for older children. Additionally, there are 9 childminders along with Romanby School’s pre-school and out of school club.  Rosedene Nursery has recently moved to premises at Broomfield school and Sacred Heart School will be offering nursery provision in this location from Autumn this year. 

Funding and site

The local authority has the statutory duty to ensure that sufficient school places are available.  It receives capital funding to address this ‘basic need’, although it is acknowledged by central government that this funding does not meet the full costs of providing additional pupil places.

It was identified in the early stages of planning for the NNDA that the development of a school site would be required. An agreement has been signed which secures both the site and a developer’s contribution of around £950k towards the construction costs. The site has capacity for future expansion if required to a total of Primary 420 places (2 form entry).  The required land transfer is currently being progressed.

A planning application for the design and layout was submitted under reference number NY/2019/0220/FUL. Planning permission was granted on 1 September 2020. Having this approval provides confidence that the remaining processes to establish the school can now commence.

The County Council’s Executive has approved an initial budget allocation for this scheme made up of both funding received from central government and the amount expected from the developer’s contribution.

Costs of developing a new school

The cost of developing a new school building on the site provided in Northallerton  will be determined by the required procurement exercise which will commence in Autumn 2020. However, based on known projects elsewhere, it is considered that the cost of a new school on this site might be in the region of £5m to £6m. 

Admission arrangements

The Academy Trust chosen to operate the School would determine the oversubscription criteria for admissions purposes. NYCC intend to propose that the new Northallerton School would not have a defined catchment area. Instead, we would  propose that priority for admission to the School would be determined by proximity to it. Catchment areas in Northallerton are historical and did not anticipate the NNDA which cuts across sections of the catchment areas for Alverton, Applegarth and Brompton schools.  There are no obvious natural boundaries with which to create a new catchment and we do not support arbitrarily introducing new boundaries by taking areas from Applegarth, Brompton and Alverton’s existing catchment areas. To do so  would disadvantage existing families and schools.

The presumption route process

It is no longer possible, unless all other options have been exhausted, for the local authority to open a new community school. Under the government’s Academy presumption it is assumed that any wholly new school will be an Academy. The local authority is required to ask for expressions of interest from sponsors to allow the Secretary of State to decide whether to enter into a funding agreement with a particular academy trust for the running of the school.

The proposed new school is therefore expected to be a mainstream free school under the DfE free school presumption process.

The formal statutory consultation, which sponsors are required to undertake under section 10 of the Academies Act 2010, takes place during the pre-opening phase of the school i.e. after the sponsor has been selected, and is not part of this process.

Who are we consulting?

Copies of this document have been sent to the governing bodies of all local schools as well as to the Church of England and Roman Catholic Dioceses, Councillors, Early Years providers, parish, town and district councils, unions and professional associations and the local MP.

The Council is consulting generally at this stage to invite any comments on aspects of the proposal prior to publishing the specification for the proposed new school. Planning permission for the specific design and layout was granted on 1 September 2020.

Responses

Because of current restrictions we are unable to hold a local drop-in session.  However, we welcome your feedback on the proposals by completing a response form online.

Give your feedback

What happens after the consultation finishes?

All the responses received by the closing date will be included in a report to the Children and Young People’s Service Executive Members on 3 November 2020. Responses from individuals will be anonymised.

Summary of proposals

School type

Mainstream primary

Age range

4-11

Reception to Year 6

Published admission number

30

Size / Capacity

210 places

Opening date

September 2022

Opening profile

First year of operation:

Reception only

Second year:

Reception and Year 1

Adding a further year group for the third year of operation and beyond until full opening is achieved

Admission arrangements

Oversubscription criteria to be determined by the chosen Academy Trust.

NYCC intend to propose that the new Northallerton School would not have a defined catchment area. Instead priority for admission to the School would be determined by proximity to it.

Proposed school location

A map showing the location of the proposed new school in Northallerton

If you need this information in an alternative format please contact us.

Primary Pupil Forecast for Northallerton

North Northallerton Primary School Places 2021/
2022
2022/
2023
2023/
2024
2024/
2025
2025/
2026
2026/
2027
2027/
2028
2028/
2029
2029/
2030
2030/
2031
Pupil forecast excluding pupils from housing developments 1410 1457 1451 1468 1482 1481 1470 1496 1465 1460
Pupil forecast including pupil yield from approved applications 1469 1546 1573 1623 1660 1659 1648 1647 1643 1638
Pupil forecast including pupil yield from approved applications and known Local Plan proposals 1469 1547 1582 1649 1706 1725 1734 1753 1769 1771
Current available school places 1505 1505 1505 1505 1505 1505 1505 1505 1505 1505
Available school places including new school of 210 places   1715 1715 1715 1715 1715 1715 1715 1715 1715

A graph showing Primary Pupil Forecast for Northallerton

This consultation ended on 23 October


We are consulting on a proposal to establish a new mainstream primary school including nursery provision, to primarily serve the Manse Farm development in Knaresborough and the proposed Highfield Farm development.

The proposed new school will also support general school place sufficiency in the Knaresborough area.

It is intended that the new school will be a free school (a state-funded school, operating as an academy, independent of the local authority) in accordance with Department for Education guidance.

The age range of the school will be 3-11, providing places for 210 pupils (one form of entry) with the ability to expand to 420 places (two forms of entry) should that be required in the future. The school will provide places for boys and girls (mixed).  

The expected opening date is September 2022.

Background

Manse Farm is a housing development in Knaresborough town which was given reserved matters planning approval for 600 dwellings in 2017 (17/05491/REMMAJ). Development on the site started in 2019, initially with some of the required highway infrastructure. The latest indications are that a build rate of 80 units per year is expected with first occupations in 2021/22. This development forms part of the c.1,400 dwellings which, it is proposed, are to be constructed in Knaresborough in the medium to long-term as part of the recently adopted Harrogate Local Plan:

Site name

Expected no. of dwellings

Status

Multiple sites

269

Planning permission granted – sites at various stages

Manse Farm

600

Planning permission granted – under construction

K25 Highfield Farm

402

Site allocated in Local Plan– planning permission not yet granted

Multiple sites

178

Sites allocated in Local Plan– planning permission not yet granted

There are a number of primary schools in Knaresborough Town and the area around the Manse Farm development site that are becoming increasingly full as primary pupil numbers are now rising alongside housing growth.

School

Type of School

Aspin Park Academy

Academy

Goldsborough CoE Primary School

Voluntary Controlled School

Knaresborough St John’s CoE Primary School

Academy

Meadowside Primary Academy

Academy

St Mary’s Catholic Primary School

Academy

The above schools are collectively close to their operational capacity and there are limited opportunities to expand these schools further.

The effects of the pandemic on the rate of house building and the housing market generally is not yet known. There is therefore potential that, having commenced the required process, NYCC may subsequently decide that September 2022 ceases to be the desired opening date. The situation will be kept under review.

Demand for a new school site

It is considered that a new school site should be developed to serve the pupils arising from the Manse Farm and the proposed Highfield Farm development sites. The impact of all of the planned housing could not be met by expanding existing school sites in Knaresborough Town and at Goldsborough, and there is a need to ensure that pupil places are available as the remaining housing comes on stream.

On the basis of the current forecasts including extra pupils arising from housing, it is anticipated that a new school site would be needed from September 2022 onwards (see Figure 1). The projected shortfall of places would continue to rise, largely due to the impacts of new housing, from 2023 onwards without the introduction of additional provision.

It is assumed that the new school would initially open for nursery and reception pupils. The second year of opening would see Nursery, Reception and Year 1 pupils accommodated, adding a further year group for the third year and beyond until a full roll of 210 is achieved. This is quite a common opening profile for newly established schools and helps to avoid destabilising existing provision.

Finding and site

The local authority has the statutory duty to ensure that sufficient school places are available.  It receives capital funding to address this ‘basic need’, although it is acknowledged by central government that this funding does not meet the full costs of providing additional pupil places.

It was identified in the early stages of planning for Manse Farm that the development of a school site would be required. An agreement has been signed which secures both the site and a developer’s contribution of around £2m towards the construction costs. The site has capacity for future expansion if required to a total of Primary 420 places (2 form entry).  The required land transfer is currently being progressed.

A planning application for the design and layout was submitted under reference number NY/2019/0215/FUL. Planning permission was granted on 11 June 2020. Having this approval provides confidence that the remaining processes to establish the school can now commence.

The County Council’s Executive has approved an initial budget allocation for this scheme made up of both funding received from central government and the amount expected from the developer’s contribution.

Cost of delivering a new school

The cost of developing a new school building on the site provided at Manse Farm will be determined by the required procurement exercise which will commence in Autumn 2020. However, based on known projects elsewhere, it is considered that the cost of a new school on this site might be in the region of £5m to £6m.  

Admission arrangements

The proposed new school will provide additional school place capacity for the whole of Knaresborough town and the immediate area. However, it will primarily serve the development area formed by the Manse Farm and Highfield Farm sites in which there is currently no housing. NYCC intend to propose that the new school should have a defined catchment area based on the boundaries of the new development sites. This would mean that for admission purposes residents of the new development would have priority for places in the event of oversubscription. This would enable the new school to best serve its immediate local area and reduce the need for journeys to alternative schools.

The nearest schools to the Manse Farm development are Knaresborough St John’s CE Primary School and Aspin Park Academy. Manse Farm falls within the current catchment area of Knaresborough St John’s. The Highfield Farm development falls within the current Goldsborough CE Primary School catchment area. Neither of the existing catchment schools have the capacity to absorb the impact of the new housing and the LA preference would be for a future reduction in the extent of their catchment areas. However, decisions around the continuation or variation of the existing catchment arrangements for these two schools would require a separate process.

The Presumption route process

It is no longer possible, unless all other options have been exhausted, for the local authority to open a new community school. Under the government’s Academy presumption it is assumed that any wholly new school will be an Academy. The local authority is required to ask for expressions of interest from sponsors to allow the Secretary of State to decide whether to enter into a funding agreement with a particular academy trust for the running of the school.

The proposed new school is therefore expected to be a mainstream free school under the DfE free school presumption process.

The formal statutory consultation, which sponsors are required to undertake under section 10 of the Academies Act 2010, takes place during the pre-opening phase of the school i.e. after the sponsor has been selected, and is not part of this process.

Who are we consulting?

Copies of this document have been sent to the governing bodies of all local schools as well as to the Church of England and Roman Catholic Dioceses, Councillors, Early Years providers, parish, town and district councils, unions and professional associations and the local MP.

The Council is consulting generally at this stage to invite any comments on aspects of the proposal prior to publishing the specification for the proposed new school. Planning permission for the specific design and layout was granted on 11 June 2020.

Responses

Because of current restrictions we are unable to hold a local drop-in session.  However, we welcome your feedback on the proposals by completing a response form online.

Closing date is 23 October 2020 at 5pm.

What happens after the consultation finishes?

All the responses received by the closing date will be included in a report to the Children and Young People’s Service Executive Members on 3 November 2020.  Responses from individuals will be anonymised.

Summary of proposals

School type

Mainstream primary

Age range

3-11

Nursery to Year 6

Published admission number

30

Size / Capacity

210 places plus nursery

Opening date

September 2022

Opening profile

First year of operation:

Nursery and Reception only

Second year:

Nursery, Reception and Year 1

Adding a further year group for the third year of operation and beyond until full opening is achieved

Admission arrangements

Oversubscription criteria to be determined by the chosen Academy Trust.

NYCC intend to propose that a defined catchment area be established for the area covered by the Manse Farm and Highfield Farm developments.

Proposed school location

Map showing the proposed location of the new school in Knaresborough

If you need this information in an alternative format please contact us.

Primary Pupil forecast for Manse Farm, Knaresborough

Primary Pupil forecast for Manse Farm, Knaresborough 2021/
2022
2022/
2023
2023/
2024
2024/
2025
2025/
2026
2026/
2027
2027/
2028
2028/
2029
2030/
2031
2031/
2032
Pupil forecast excluding pupils from housing developments 1224 1211 1224 1220 1207 1205 1205 1196 1188 1181
Pupil forecast including pupil yield from approved applications 1239 1310 1364 1402 1399 1407 1417 1413 1405 1398
Pupil forecast including pupil yield from approved applications and known Local Plan proposals 1239 1310 1419 1486 1510 1545 1555 1551 1543 1536
Current available school places   1319 1319 1319 1319 1319 1319 1319 1319 1319
Available school places including new school of 210 places   1529 1529 1529 1529 1529 1529 1529 1529 1529

Graph showing Primary Pupil forecast for Manse Farm, Knaresborough

The draft Air Quality Strategy is a countywide strategy that aims to ensure air quality in North Yorkshire is protected and, where necessary, improved.

By doing so it is hoped we can help reduce the health and environmental impacts of air pollution and ensure the county remains a special place for everyone to live, work and visit.

Air pollution is a mixture of particles and gases in the air which impacts on the health of people or has other harmful environmental effects.

In North Yorkshire, the district and borough councils are responsible for monitoring air quality in towns, villages and across the countryside.

We have a responsibility for public health and as the highway authority for the local road network have a statutory duty to work with district and borough councils where air quality issues arise.

This strategy presents an opportunity to support work to reduce outdoor air pollution and strengthen existing partnerships with the district councils who are also the Local Planning Authorities with responsibility for planning decisions for residential, commercial and industrial developments.

The document sets our overall strategic direction in the areas where we can influence a reduction in air pollution, including setting out our approach to ultra-low emission vehicles, whilst recognising that electric vehicles are complementary to the wider sustainable transport agenda.

The strategy recognises other sources of pollution, including agriculture, domestic fuel burning and industry.

To achieve the overall ambition of maintaining and achieving good air quality we have adopted four key objectives:

  • Raise the profile of improving air quality in the context of North Yorkshire
  • Work in partnership with borough and district councils and other organisations to protect and, where appropriate, improve air quality
  • Ensure that improving or maintaining good air quality is a key consideration when planning and delivering County Council services
  • Support the use of Ultra Low Emission Vehicles (ULEVs) in North Yorkshire

The strategy focuses on using our influence to reduce local air pollution and emissions, it complements the wider climate change agenda and our aspiration to become carbon neutral as close as possible to 2030.

The Air Quality Strategy is an addition to the NYCC Local Transport Plan 2016-2045 which highlights Environment and Climate Change as a key objective, and also has links to the 2017 Plan to Deliver Economic Growth.

The strategy’s objectives are supported by an action plan. Many initiatives in the action plan already form part of the work we do every day, however, where possible we will look for external funding opportunities to deliver new measures that do not put extra pressure on existing finances.

Consultation document

The draft Air Quality Strategy,  Protecting North Yorkshire’s Air Quality 2020-2045 (pdf / 3 MB) outlines our vision.

 

This consultation ended on Wednesday 19 August 2020.


The County Council’s Chief Executive Officer, under his emergency delegated powers and in consultation with Executive Members, has approved the publication of a statutory notice on 30 April 2020 regarding proposals to lower the age range of pupils from 4 to 11 to 2 to 11 at Riccall CP School with effect from 1 September 2020.

This will give a further four weeks for representation to be made. Any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by 5pm on 28 May 2020.

Comments on the statutory notice can be sent to:

Strategic Planning - Children and Young People's Service
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
DL7 8AD

This consultation will run from the 28 April to the 28 May.

 Riccall CP statutory notice (pdf / 182 KB)

 Riccall CP statutory proposal (pdf / 110 KB)

Background information

 Report to Executive - 21 April 2020  (pdf / 469 KB)

This consultation ended on Wednesday 19 August 2020.


Notice is given in accordance with School Organisation (Prescribed Alterations to Maintained Schools) (England) Regulations 2013 that North Yorkshire County Council intends to make prescribed alterations to:

Proposals to add provision for special educational needs: social, emotional and mental health in the form of targeted provision at the following schools:

  1. The Wensleydale School, Richmond Road, Leyburn DL8 5HY
  2. Selby High School, Leeds Road, Selby YO8 4HT.
  3. Hambleton and Richmondshire Pupil Referral Unit, East Road, Northallerton DL6 1SZ.
  4. Scarborough Pupil Referral Unit, Valley Bridge Parade, Scarborough YO11 2PG.

from 1 September 2020 to add provision reserved for children with special educational needs. This will support up to 8 full time pupils with Social, Emotional and Mental Health needs at each school and each pupil referral unit.

Proposals to add provision for special educational needs: communication and interaction in the form of targeted provision at the following schools:

  1. Grove Road Community Primary School, Grove Road, Harrogate, North Yorkshire HG1 5EP.
  2. Alverton Primary School, Mount Road, Northallerton DL6 1RB.

from 1 September 2020 to add provision reserved for children with special educational needs. This will support up to 8 full time pupils with Communication and Interaction needs at each school.

Proposals to formally remove provision for children with special educational needs from the following mainstream schools (previously designated as enhanced mainstream schools)

  1. Embsay Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School, Pasture Road, Embsay, Skipton, North Yorkshire, BD23 6RH.
  2. Kirkbymoorside Community Primary, Westfields, Kirkbymoorside, York, North Yorkshire YO62 6AG.
  3. Thorpe Willoughby Community Primary School, Londesborough Grove, Fox Lane, Thorpe Willoughby, Selby, North Yorkshire, YO8 9NX.
  4. King James’s School, King James Road, Knaresborough, North Yorkshire, HG5 8EB.
  5. Bedale Church of England Primary School, Firby Road, Bedale DL8 2AT.
  6. Bedale High School, Fitzalan Road, Bedale DL8 2EQ.
  7. Thirsk Primary School, Hambleton Place, Thirsk YO7 1SL.
  8. Barrowcliff Primary School, Ash Grove, Scarborough YO12 6NJ.
  9. Lady Lumley’s School, Swainsea Lane, Pickering YO18 8NG.
  10. Malton School, Middlecave Road, Malton YO17 7NH.
  11. Barwic Parade Community Primary School, Petre Ave, Selby YO8 8DJ.
  12. Greatwood Community Primary School, Pinhaw Rd, Skipton BD23 2SJ.
  13. Upper Wharfedale School, 1 Wharfeside Ave, Threshfield, Skipton BD23 5BS.
  14. Mill Hill Community Primary School, Crosby Road, Northallerton DL6 1AE.

from 1 September 2020 to remove the provision reserved for children with special educational needs which the schools have held since 2010 when they were designated as Enhanced Mainstream Schools.

These Notices are extracts from the complete proposal.

 Statutory proposals 1 (pdf / 382 KB)

 Statutory proposals 2 (pdf / 379 KB)

Copies of the complete proposals can be obtained from Strategic Planning Children and Young People’s Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton DL7 8AE.

Within four weeks from the date of publication of this proposal, any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by sending them to Strategic Planning, Children and Young People’s Service, North Yorkshire County Council County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, by 5pm on 17 July 2020.

This consultation ended on Thursday, 4 June 2020

Part of the formal Open Market Review process is the public consultation period which ran for one calendar month ending 4th June 2020.

The  public consultation closure document (pdf / 789 KB) contains details of the responses made during the consultation and the resulting actions taken from the information supplied.


Background

North Yorkshire covers 8,654 square kilometres (3,341 sq mi) and geographically is the largest County in England. The County includes the towns of Harrogate, Richmond, Scarborough, Selby and Skipton, as well as Ripon and the County town of Northallerton. 

North Yorkshire County Council (NYCC) has a Vision to provide Next Generation Access (NGA) broadband services (capable of delivering download speeds of at least 30 Mbps) to all premises within the North Yorkshire boundaries, through the Superfast North Yorkshire (SFNY) project. 

Phases 1, 2 and 3 of the projects will see superfast broadband delivered to approximately 90% of the premises within North Yorkshire by June 2021.  

The final 10% of premises present a challenge to the Vision for the SFNY Project. The remaining premises will be covered by a 4th and final phase.  

Open Market Review

In preparation for this procurement, SFNY has undertaken an Open Market Review (OMR) between 17th January 2020 and 28th February 2020 to establish existing and planned (within the next 3 years) coverage of broadband infrastructure across the SFNY Programme Area. This included both commercial coverage by existing and prospective NGA broadband infrastructure providers and coverage procured under SFNY’s existing contracts with BT plc.  

SFNY contacted all known broadband infrastructure operators within the Programme Area and other providers known to have (or potentially having) plans to deploy new networks across the UK with a formal request for information. The OMR was also publicised through a notification on he Yortender procurement portal. Operators were requested to provide information on their existing and planned NGA broadband infrastructure (capable of delivering download speeds of at least 30 Mbps), and to provide detail of their coverage at a premise and infrastructure level to enable greater granularity of mapping. 

Public Consultation

The EU Guidelines (at paragraph 78) and the 2016 NBS set out the requirements to hold a public consultation in order to validate the intervention area mapping by allowing all interested stakeholders an opportunity to comment on the planned aid measure. 

The purpose of this document is to fulfil those requirements by publishing a description of the proposed aid measure and seeking feedback from all interested stakeholders. The mapping for NGA broadband are shown in the attached maps. 

This State aid public consultation and the proposed NGA broadband Intervention Area maps are available to all stakeholders below, at SFNY OMR MAP and will also be available via BDUK’s website.

This State Aid public consultation will run from 4 May 2020 and will close on 4 June 2020. 

Once the State Aid public consultation is complete and the Intervention Areas have been formalised, SFNY will undertake a further procurement to deliver NGA Broadband coverage into a Third Phase of its roll out programme.

 Full details on how to respond to the Public Consultation. (pdf / 924 KB)

This consultation ended on Tuesday, 26 May 2020


The  Statutory proposals (pdf / 371 KB) and  Statutory notice (pdf / 361 KB) have been published for this proposal and a representation period is underway closing on 21 May 2020. For full details of the background to the proposal please see all documents below.

Purpose of report

This report details the outcome of the public consultation carried out by the Children and Young People’s Service on the proposals to formally confirm the establishment of satellite specialist sixth form provision for Springhead School on the former Graham Lower School site in Scarborough. By doing so would also confirm an increase in available capacity at the school. It asks the Executive to consider the responses to the consultation, to authorise the publication of statutory proposals, and to schedule taking a final decision on the proposals on 9 June 2020.

Executive summary

Springhead School is a Special School in Scarborough serving pupils with a wide range of special educational needs across an age range of 2-19 years old. In 2017, in response to a specific pressure on places at Springhead School, the Local Authority supported the school through an informal consultation on moving their existing Sixth Form provision onto a site at Lady Edith’s Drive in Scarborough. This had formerly been the Graham Lower School Site and was vacant at that point. 
 
Prior to the temporary expansion on the new site the school could accommodate approximately 75 pupils with the relevant Special Educational Needs. As a result of the expansion on the additional site this has been increased to approximately 85 and this capacity will be made permanent by this proposal. 
 
On 14 January 2020 the Executive Members for the Children and Young People’s Service gave approval for consultation on proposals to formally confirm the establishment of satellite specialist sixth form provision for Springhead School on the former Graham Lower School site in Scarborough. The report provided the full background and is attached as Appendix 1.

The consultation commenced on 24 January 2020 and closed on 6 March 2020. This report details the responses to the consultation and asks the Executive to consider authorising the publication of proposals and statutory notices, and to schedule taking a final decision on the proposals on 9 June 2020. 

The report is supported by a number of Appendices as listed below:

Consultation undertaken

Consultation documents (Appendix 2) were distributed to the lists of consultees (Appendix 3). The documents were also published on the websites of Springhead School and NYCC. The consultation period ran from 24 January to 6 March 2020. 
 
A public engagement meeting was held at the Springhead Sixth Form Site on 4 February 2020. A record of the meetings are attached as Appendix 4.  
 
By the closing date 6 consultation responses had been received for the proposal and these are shown in full in Appendix 5. 
 
The issues raised from the responses included:  

  • The future use of other buildings on the site by Springhead School.
  • Concerns around management of any future building work on the site with the Sixth Form in situ. 

Responses to the consultation and other key issues

Positive Impact of Proposal on Sixth Form Provision

The respondents commented on the positive impact of the proposal that has already been experienced through the temporary operation of the satellite site. There was particular reference made to the fact that pupils in the sixth form felt that they have progressed and ‘moved up’ to Sixth Form College and that this was a benefit. The location of the site was also praised as it has good transport links for pupils to arrive independently or with support and also to travel to other parts of the town as part of their education. A general feeling was also expressed that the fact there was more space on the satellite site meant that there were more opportunities in a better learning environment. One respondent referred to the site as an ‘excellent facility’. 

Positive Impact of Proposal on Provision at the Main Site

It was felt by respondents that there was a consequential benefit to the staff and pupils on the main site of the satellite operating. The view was expressed that the main site was overcrowded before the temporary occupation of the sixth form site began. 

Possibility of use of Wider Site by Springhead School

The mostly widely expressed view in the consultation was actually one that is not relevant to the specific matter being considered. Staff, parents and pupils were hopeful that the proposal would lead to a wider use of the site by Springhead pupils. This reflects the view that the operation of the satellite has been successful and respondents want to see the use of the site solidified and expanded. 

Conclusion

Consultees were unanimously supportive of the proposed change. The reasons for the support of the proposal were predominately the improved provision that the temporary operation of the site had provided for both the Sixth Form students and those on the main site. The majority of comments were actually related to future use of the site rather than the specific proposal to formally establish the satellite site. If the outcome of the process is that the proposals are implemented, the local authority will need to consider the issues raised in the consultation when looking at any subsequent proposals for the use of the wider site. 
 
Officers would attribute the small number of responses to the consultation and the very low attendance at the engagement session to the fact that the proposal has worked well on a temporary basis and the formalising of the arrangement is considered non-contentious. 

Proposals

The proposal is to formally confirm the establishment of satellite specialist sixth form provision for Springhead School on the former Graham Lower School site in Scarborough and by doing so to confirm the increase in places available at the school from approximately 75 places to approximately 85 places.  

Financial implications

Revenue and Capital Funding

The implications for revenue and capital funding were set out in the report to Executive Members on 14 January 2020 attached as Appendix 1. 

Legal implications 

The Education and Inspections Act and School Organisation regulations and guidance1 apply to the processes involved in publishing proposals. Careful regard has been had to these provisions. The proposals are in accordance with the statutory requirements.  

Human rights implications

There are no Human Rights issues in relation to this decision. 

Other implications

An Equality Impact Assessment has been undertaken in respect of these proposals and is attached (Appendix 6). The only impact on any groups with protected characteristics will be a positive one. These proposals are being brought to formalise a temporary move onto the satellite site and therefore have no adverse impact. 

List of Appendices

This consultation ended on Tuesday, 26 May 2020


Local authorities can seek to negotiate a contribution from developers towards the cost of meeting infrastructure necessary to support their development. For education this means asking for a contribution towards the cost of extending or reconfiguring an existing school or setting or building a new one.

This policy sets out how we will consider whether existing school capacity is sufficient to accommodate proposed development within the relevant area, and if it is not:

  • the developer contributions needed for education, based on known pupil yields from all homes where children live; this includes primary, secondary, special educational needs and disabilities, and early years provision;
  • when we will request contributions of land to provide sites for new or expanded schools.

Our proposals

In the light of changes to legislation and updated Government guidance, our policy will include the following proposals:

  • Requesting S106 contributions for education across the county;
  • Using our existing method for assessing whether a primary or secondary education contribution is required;
  • Following DfE’s preferred cost per place (using national average costs published in DfE School Place Scorecards);
  • Lowering the thresholds for seeking primary education contributions to ten houses and for secondary education contributions to 25 houses;
  • Introducing contributions for Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Early Years for larger developments;
  • Recommending the use of model clauses in Section 106 agreements for education contributions and for new education sites.

Consultation Document

Our  consultation document is available to download (pdf / 428 KB).

Give us your views

Your views about this proposal are welcomed. You can either complete and return the response sheet, or submit an online response. Paper responses should be returned to: FREEPOST RTKE-RKAY-CUJS, Developer Contributions, Strategic Planning, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton DL7 8AE

Deadline for comments

The closing date for responses was 1 May 2020.

What happens next?

All responses to the consultation received by 1 May will be considered by our Executive on 19 May. They will decide whether to approve the draft policy for implementation. It is proposed to implement the new policy from 1 June 2020.

It will be for each individual district council, as the local planning authority, to consider on a case by case basis whether a planning obligation for education is necessary to make a development acceptable in planning terms, taking into consideration their Local Plan policies, our policy, and relevant legislation and guidance.

Other useful information

 Draft Developer Contributions Policy  (pdf / 425 KB)

 Draft Supporting Appendices to the Developer Contributions Policy (pdf / 728 KB)

This consultation ended on Tuesday, 26 May 2020


Notice is given in accordance with section 15(1) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, intends to discontinue Clapham Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, The Green, Clapham, Lancaster, LA2 8EJ on 31 August 2020. 
 
Copies of the complete proposal can be obtained from: Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE and are available on the County Council's website.

Within four weeks from the date of publication of this proposal, any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by sending them to Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, by 5pm on 21 May 2020.

 Statutory Notice Clapham primary school (pdf / 176 KB) (pdf / 176 KB)

 Statutory proposals for school closure of Clapham primary school (pdf / 874 KB) (pdf / 874 KB)


Background

Pupil numbers at the school have been falling, reducing from 42 on roll in 2014/15 to 28 at the start of the 2018/19 academic year. The drop in numbers increased concern around the financial sustainability of the school and its ability to provide good quality education. On 5 February 2019 Executive Members gave approval to progress a consultation on a proposed closure of Clapham CE VC Primary School with effect from 31 August 2019. During the consultation period a number of responses were received including a detailed response from the Governing Body showing a recovery plan, which they felt, along with ongoing community support, could see the school recover to a position that would enable the school to stay open.  

At a meeting on 30 April 2019 the Executive agreed that the proposal to cease to maintain Clapham CE VC Primary School should be stopped to allow the Governing Body to implement their recovery plan, with a formal review of the position scheduled for the end of the spring term 2020. 

Since the April Executive meeting the school has been inspected by Ofsted and placed in special measures. The publication of the recent inspection result in September has led to a further decline in pupil numbers making the Governing Body’s recovery plan no longer viable. This led to the Governing Body requesting a consultation on a proposed closure. 

This is a wholly new consultation and focuses on four key areas of concern:

  • Low pupil numbers
  • Breadth of curriculum
  • The school's financial position
  • Leadership 

The critical concern is the fall in pupil numbers, which would inevitably result in an inability to provide the necessary breadth of curriculum experience and would also irrevocably undermine the school’s future financial position. 

Pupil Numbers

At the start of the 2019/20 academic year there were 25 pupils on roll. This is well below the capacity of the school – which is designed to accommodate up to 59 pupils if all spaces are in use. Since September there has been a further fall in numbers and in November 2019 the school had ten pupils on roll. Forecasts indicate that these numbers will not recover significantly in the longer term. 

In these circumstances, it would be difficult to deliver and sustain quality education.   

Total roll numbers:

  • 2014/15 – 42
  • 2015/16 – 39
  • 2016/17 – 34
  • 2017/18 – 27
  • 2018/19 – 28
  • 2019/20 – 25 (at the start of the year, dropping to 10 in November) 

Pupil numbers as at 7 January 2020

Reception 0
Year 1 0
Year 2 0
Year 3 3
Year 4 0
Year 5 2
Year 6 4
Total 9

Latest forecast information predicts only one new reception aged starter in 2020/21. This combined with the progressive reduction in existing year groups results in a forecast total roll of six in 2020/21. 

Breadth of curriculum

We have already identified concerns around the school’s ability to meet the educational need of children with such small numbers. As numbers on roll continue to fall it will be increasingly difficult to provide the remaining pupils with access to the full range of experiences they need, particularly opportunities for working and playing with children their own age.  

The Ofsted inspection in June judged the school to be inadequate in all areas. 

The financial position

Pupil numbers determine the school budget. Examination of the predicted financial position has led to concerns about the school’s ability to provide a good quality of education. The school is projecting in year deficits of £46,000 in 2020/21 and £77,900 in 2021/22, and cumulative deficit of £202,600 by the end of that year. These were based on pupil assumptions at the time of 27 in 2019/20 and 22 in 2020/21, so the position will deteriorate further as pupil numbers fall with no reasonable prospect of financial recovery. 

Leadership

Previous attempts to recruit a substantive headteacher or identify another school prepared to share a headteacher have not proved possible. With effect from September 2019, an Executive Headteacher from The Priestley Multi Academy Trust has been appointed to oversee school leadership. A full time Head of School from the MAT has also been appointed for this school year. We are currently providing temporary financial support to meet the cost of the Executive Headteacher, but this is not sustainable. 

The proposal

For the reasons outlined above it is proposed that Clapham CE VC Primary School should close with effect from 31 August 2020. 

The nearest Church of England school, two miles from Clapham, is Austwick CE VA Primary School. There is also, Ingleton Primary School which is 4.7 miles from Clapham, Bentham CP School at 5.5 miles, Giggleswick Primary School at 5.8 miles, Settle CE Primary at 6.9 miles and Long Preston VA School at 9.7 miles away. 

It is proposed that the catchment areas of both Austwick CE VA Primary School and Bentham CP School are expanded to include the current Clapham catchment area. We would welcome consultees’ views on the proposed catchment area extension.  

For children currently at Clapham CE VC Primary School, we will work with each family to try to meet their individual preferences for other schools regardless of the catchment area defined. Staff and governors at Clapham CE VC Primary School are also committed to supporting families in their choice of school and in making a smooth transition.  

Eligibility for home-to-school transport will be determined in line with our current home-to-school transport policy and procedures, based on travel distances from each child’s home address and individual circumstances.   

Parents have a right to express a preference for any school and, in the case of community and voluntary controlled schools, the Local Authority is the admissions authority. In the case of Voluntary Aided schools, the Governing Body is the Admissions Authority. 

All of the local schools have indicated a willingness to admit pupils potentially displaced from Clapham School, subject to available capacity and resources being available for the specific year groups concerned. Where a child attends a school, which is not their normal school or nearest school, parents are normally responsible for making transport arrangements.    

Our Admissions Team is always happy to give advice to parents – please contact Vickie Hemming-Allen on 01609 535481 or Lisa Herdman on 01609 534953

The school site

The school building is not owned by ourselves, it is held on an implied Trust for the purposes of a school. The playing field is leased in by ourselves from a private landowner. Decisions about the future use of the school buildings and playing field will be taken by the owners after the closure proposal has been determined. 

Anticipated Key Dates
Consultation Opens 10 January 2020 
Public meeting - Village Hall  4 February 2020
Consultation closes 28 February 2020 
County Council’s Executive considers consultation response  24 March 2020
Statutory Notices published (4 weeks for representations to be made)  20 April 2020
Final decision by County Council’s Executive  9 June 2020
Proposed school closure date 31 August 2020

Other useful information

View school catchment areas on an interactive version of this map 

This consultation ended on Tuesday, 26 May 2020


We have a duty to keep our special education provision under review and ensure there is the right type of provision and enough places to meet the needs of children and young people with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND).

We want all children and young people with SEND in North Yorkshire to:

  • have the best educational opportunities so that they achieve the best outcomes;
  • be able to attend a school or provision locally, where they can make friends and be part of their local community; and
  • make progress with learning, have good social and emotional health and be prepared for a fulfilling adult life.

We know that there are more children and young people being identified as having special educational needs in North Yorkshire and we expect this increase to continue. We need to make sure that we have the right type of education provision in the right place to meet their needs. We know that a number of our children and young people have to go to school outside North Yorkshire, and we want to avoid this wherever possible.

We have developed a strategic plan for educating children with SEND which aims to create a better offer of provision for children and young people, improved communication, enable more local decision making, and reduce costly out of county placements. This plan was approved in September 2018 and we are now implementing the actions within it.

We have previously carried out a consultation exercise on the SEND Strategic Plan from 18 May 2018 to 28 June 2018 and then subsequently from 6 February 2020 to 15 March 2020 on the specific issue of establishing Targeted Mainstream provisions.

We are now seeking your views, in line with Department for Education guidance, specifically on the changes of designation for each of the schools named below either to enable Targeted Mainstream Provision to be established or previous SEND designations to be removed in relation to the ceasing of the previous Enhanced Mainstream School model.

To view the full consultation, please visit the Consultation on Implementing Targeted Mainstream Provision for Children with SEND page.

Consultation closed on 6 March 2020


We want to hear your views on a proposal to make the temporary satellite specialist sixth form provision for Springhead School on the former Graham Lower School site in Scarborough permanent from 1 September 2020.

The current position

In May 2017, Springhead School, in partnership with ourselves, spoke with parents, staff and the wider community about temporarily moving the sixth form provision onto the recently vacated Graham Lower School Site. Following a period of consultation, the Governing Body of Springhead School decided to approve this proposal. The decision was put in place in September 2017. It was explained that this decision would be reviewed within three years.  
 
The Springhead School Sixth Form provision has now been operating from the site at Lady Edith’s Drive for more than two years. The establishment of the Sixth Form provision at Lady Edith’s Drive has been overwhelmingly positive and has resulted in the following benefits: 

  • Improved facilities for all pupils across a dual-site school. The school’s philosophy, ethos, expertise and values are shared.
  • An increased ability to offer an appropriate environment for learning, in all its forms, for all pupils.
  • Provided an opportunity to upgrade provision on the Barry’s Lane site, and re-establish some specialist areas within school.
  • Given those pupils who need it space and quiet during the school day.  
  • Improved the working environment, which has impacted positively on the self-esteem and well-being of all pupils and staff.
  • Improved the transport issues on Barry’s Lane at the beginning and end of the day.
  • Given the Y11 pupils the chance to ‘step up’ and develop their responsibilities, as they have become the oldest on the Barry’s Lane site.
  • Brought all primary children together onto the same site at Springhead School, and all Sixth Form students together onto the same site.  
  • The new site has provided opportunities for dedicated space for therapeutic interventions from health and professionals.  
  • Enhanced the exciting and innovative curriculum provision that meets pupils' needs and supports them in achieving their full potential.
  • Provided classroom space for both pupils remaining at Springhead School and those pupils moving to the proposed new site.
  • Relocation of post 16 provision onto the new site has improved capacity across the existing site and the Sixth Form provision on the Lower Graham School site. The new site has enabled young people to undertake a wider curriculum, strengthening preparation for adulthood and access to nearby facilities, such as Cherry Tree Lodge. 

Along with the school, we are now looking to formally adopt these arrangements and would like to hear interested parties' views on the proposal.

What Happens Next? 

You can either complete and return a   response sheet (pdf / 715 KB) (pdf / 715 KB) or submit an online response. In addition, there will be a drop in session at the Springhead Sixth Form site on 4 February. Representatives from Springhead School and ourselves will be available between 2pm and 5pm to discuss the proposal. 

Paper responses should be returned to: Freepost, RTKE-RKAY-CUJS, Springhead School Strategic Planning, North Yorkshire County Council County Hall, Northallerton DL7 8AE.

Closing Date

The closing date for responses is 6 March 2020. All responses to the consultation received by this date will be considered by our Executive on 24 March. If the Executive decides to proceed with the proposal, then statutory notices would be published in the local press on 20 April 2020. These notices provide a further four weeks for representations to be made. A final decision would then be made by the Executive on 9 June. If agreed, the decision would be formally implemented from September 1 2020.

Anticipated Key Dates 

All dates are subject to approvals at each stage. 

 
Consultation opens 24 January 2020
Community Engagement Drop in Session  4 February 2020
Consultation closes  6 March 2020
County Council’s Executive considers consultation response  24 March 2020
Statutory Notices published (4 weeks for representations to be made)  20 April 2020
Final decision by County Council’s Executive  9 June 2020
Formal Establishment of  specialist satellite provision  1 September 2020

Consultation Document

A copy of the   consultation document (pdf / 715 KB) (pdf / 715 KB) is available to download.

This consultation ended on Sunday, 19 April 2020


We are consulting on our proposal for the future provision of home to school transport for those that are not entitled to receive it for free.

We spend in excess of £24 million per year on home to school transport, and aim to provide a safe and good quality service, whilst balancing costs to ensure that it provides overall value for money. 

We provide home to school transport using vehicles that meet the needs of entitled pupils. Where entitled pupils have mobility needs that require accessible vehicles an accessible vehicle is provided.

We would like to use only accessible buses for home to school transport but we cannot afford to do so. A recent tender has shown that the additional annual cost of requiring accessible buses for home to school transport is, on average, approximately £12,000 per bus. If we were to only use accessible buses for all home to school transport it could cost another £2.7million per year.

This level of additional cost would impact significantly on our resources and it is proposed that we continue to allow operators to use non accessible vehicles for home to school transport, unless otherwise required by law or to meet the mobility needs of pupils.

Vehicles used for home for school transport often have spare seats which we have made available for non-entitled and post 16 pupils for a charge. We received £610,000 in income from selling spare seats in 2018/19 but a legal challenge has meant that we had to stop charging for some spare seats from September 2019 and our annual income has gone down to about £270,000.

We are only allowed to charge for spare seats where the vehicle used meets the requirements of the Public Service Vehicles Accessibility Regulations (PSVAR) or is otherwise exempt. PSVAR requires vehicles to be accessible for anyone to use regardless of disability or mobility needs. Most vehicles used on home to school transport, especially to mainstream schools, are not accessible but the Government has recently allowed further exemptions potentially up to 2023 that would allow us to reintroduce charges on most of our services.

We are therefore proposing to reintroduce charges for the use of spare seats on home to school transport where it would be legal to do so, and to allow those pupils currently using spare seats on vehicles where we cannot charge to continue to travel for free up to July 2021.

This is not an ideal situation as it means that for a short time some pupils will have to pay and other will not, but the alternatives are either not affordable, or mean we have to immediately stop allowing some or all non-entitled and post 16 pupils to travel using spare seats.

This would significantly inconvenience up to 2,300 pupils and their families, add to congestion and emissions from having more vehicles on the road, and would mean we would be unable to collect circa £535,000 per year of income we would be entitled to recover.

Consultation Document

We are now consulting on our proposal for the future provision of home to school transport. The consultation is seeking views on.

  • The use of accessible vehicles for home to school transport.
  • Whether spare seats should be made available for non-entitled and post 16 pupils.
  • The criteria to be used for allocating spare seats if the demand is greater than the number of seats available.
  • How we should respond to consider the needs of people with disabilities when considering the use of spare seats.

If you would like to contribute your views please ensure you have read the   full consultation document (pdf / 554 KB) (pdf / 554 KB) before answering the survey questions.

FAQs

What is this consultation about?

We provide home to school transport free of charge to all entitled children up to the end of year 11. Eligibility is to the nearest or catchment school and is dependent on a number of factors specific to each child, including distance to school, age, mobility and health needs, and the safety of the walked route. There are currently over 12,500 pupils entitled for free home to school transport in North Yorkshire. This consultation will not affect entitlement to free home to school transport.

There are often spare seats on home to school transport which we make available to other non-entitled and post 16 pupils. About 2,300 non-entitled or post 16 pupils currently travel to and from school using spare seats. This Consultation seeks views on whether and under what circumstances we should continue to allow non-entitled and post 16 pupils to travel in spare seats on home to school transport, and when a charge should be made.

Does this affect transport provided directly by the school?

This consultation covers Home to School Transport provided by us and not transport provided directly by a school. If your school provides home to school transport, then you should contact them directly to discuss any questions or concerns you may have after reading the consultation document.

Why are we consulting on home to school transport?

We use a mix of vehicles for home to school transport, including buses, coaches, minibuses and taxis. Most of the vehicles used for home to school transport are not suitable for pupils with disabilities, but where an entitled pupil has a mobility need we will always provide a suitable vehicle. 

We would like to be able to use spare seats on home to school transport for non-entitled and post 16 pupils, but we can only charge for these spare seats if the vehicle is accessible, or is exempt from the Public Service Vehicles Accessibility Regulations 2000 (PSVAR)

We need to decide if it is going to make spare seats available to non-entitled and post 16 pupils and under what circumstances it will charge for the use of those seats.

Who is affected by the proposals in this consultation?

This consultation does not affect any pupil entitled to free home to school transport.

The proposals in this consultation could affect

  1. Any non-entitled or post 16 pupils who travel to and from school using spare seats on Council provided transport. This Consultation seeks views on whether and under what circumstances we should continue to allow non-entitled and post 16 pupils to travel in spare seats on home to school transport, and when a charge should be made. You may be affected if you are:

             a. a year 11 pupil intending to take their studies on to college or sixth form and wanting to use North Yorkshire provided home to school transport
             b. anyone with a  Pink (post 16) Scholars Travel Permit or Green (up to year 11) Scholars Travel Permit expiring August 2020
             c. any other non-entitled or Post 16 pupils travelling without charge on North Yorkshire provided home to school transport

  1. Pupils with mobility needs who require accessible transport.
    This consultation proposes that we provide suitable vehicles to meet the mobility needs of pupils entitled to free home to school transport but that we continue to allow the use of non-accessible vehicles in other circumstances. You may be affected by this consultation if you are not entitled to free home to school transport but:

             a) have a mobility need requiring accessible transport and
             b) wish to travel to school or college using a spare seat on Council provided transport.

What are the options?

We have identified four options that it considers offer the most appropriate and viable way forward. None of these options is without challenges or difficulties as discussed below. We are seeking your opinion on these options:

Option 1 – Transport only entitled pupils. This would mean removing the offer of transport to all 2,300 non-entitled and post 16 pupils to travel using spare seats, and would reduce income to us by £270,000 each year.

Option 2 – Charge where it is lawful to do so - but do not offer spare seats on vehicles where it would be unlawful to charge. This option allows us to continue to transport about 1,960 of the 2,300  pupils currently using spare seats but would mean that we would have to stop transporting the rest. This is a short term option for up to 4 years after which the numbers of non-entitled and post 16 pupils we can transport will reduce to about 1,600 unless we can secure more accessible vehicles. Council income will increase under this option by £260,000 per year for four years, and then it will reduce so that it is £90,000 more than now.

Option 3 – Charge where it is lawful to do so - and offer other spare seats for free. This allows all but about 80 pupils to continue to travel with the same levels of income as Options 2, but may be seen as unfair as some pupils are charged and others are not.

Option 4 (Proposed Option)– Combination of Option 2 and Option 3. Option 3 as an interim option until July 2021 combined with a policy of not accepting any new applications to use spare seats unless the vehicle concerned is compliant with PSVAR or otherwise exempt, then Option 2. Most of the pupils that would travel for free under Option 2 are post 16 pupils that will finish their studies in 2020 or 2021. This option is a compromise that allows these pupils to have access to transport to enable them to finish their studies, but after July 2021 no non-entitled or post 16 pupils shall travel without charge.

At this stage prior to this consultation, this option is considered the most appropriate approach.

What are we proposing to do?

In summary, it is proposed that we continue to:

  • Only secure transport for entitled pupils: the presumption is that post 16 and non-entitled pupils will make their own arrangements to travel to school (noting that Post 16 pupils may qualify for assistance from us - which may be by provision of transport or payment of an allowance)
  • Provide transport using the most economic means of transport that is capable of meeting the needs of the pupil - including trains, public bus services and taxis.

It is then proposed that:

  • Where pupils do not have mobility needs that require accessible transport we may use vehicles that are not accessible.
  • Spare seats on vehicles procured for home to school transport may be offered to non-entitled and post 16 pupils and allocated according to published criteria.
  • A charge will be made for the use of spare seats by non-entitled and post 16 pupils where the vehicle used is compliant with the requirements of PSVAR or otherwise exempt.
  • Pupils with Scholar Travel Permits currently travelling in spare seats on vehicles that are not compliant with the requirements of PSVAR, or otherwise exempt, will be able to continue to travel without charge for a period up to July 2021. This would be subject to the normal provisions that the offer can be withdrawn at any time if the seat is required for an entitled pupil, and on the understanding that a charge can be introduced with at least one month’s notice if the vehicle either becomes exempt from PSVAR or is replaced with another vehicle that is compliant or otherwise exempt.
  • Daily fares paid for the use of spare seats will only be taken where vehicles are accessible and comply with PSVAR.
  • New applications for use of spare seats will only be considered where vehicles are PSVAR compliant or otherwise exempt.
  • We may require a PSVAR compliant vehicle to enable it to offer spare seats to non-entitled and post 16 pupils, but will only do so where it is cost effective and represents value for money.

The proposal is that these arrangements are effective from the start of the 2020/21 academic year.

If they are accepted, when will these proposals start?

These arrangements would be effective from the start of the 2020/21 academic year.

What criteria will we use to allocate spare seats on vehicles where it would unlawful to charge?

Spare seats are/could be allocated to criteria that prioritise factors such as whether a child has any special educational needs, whether siblings already travel on the vehicle, and distance from school. The consultation asks which issues should be prioritised when we consider allocating spare seats.

What will the charges for spare seats be?

 

 

Non-entitled pupils up to year 11

Post 16 pupils travelling to college or sixth form

2019/20

£390

£490

2020/21

£490

£600

2021/22

£550

TBC

Charges have yet to be confirmed for future years, but it has already been decided that they will be the same for both non-entitled and post 16 pupils. Charges for post 16 pupils are subject to a 50% discount for families in receipt of a low income.

Where can you find out more about Home to School Transport?

You can find further information at our school and college transportation page.

Summary Document

We have a  summary document of the consultation available to download. (pdf / 393 KB)

Easy Read Document

 An easy read version of this summary is available to download here. (pdf / 1014 KB)

Services where spare seats are currently made available to non-entitled and post 16 pupils and may be affected

You can download our document showing  Services where spare seats are currently made available to non-entitled and post 16 pupils and may be affected (pdf / 51 KB) here.

Letters to Parents or Guardians 

 Letter to Parents/Guardians of those who are non-entitled or Post 16 and currently making a payment (on accessible transport or transport that is 22 seats or less) and Year 11 entitled to free transport currently (going onto Post 16 education from September 2020 and may want to use home to school transport). (pdf / 441 KB)

 Letter to Parents/Guardians of those who are non-entitled or Post 16 and are currently not paying to travel on home to school transport as they are currently travelling on non-accessible transport. (pdf / 457 KB)

This consultation ended on February 24, 2020


Background

Your library, your place 2020-2030: give your views on our priorities and key ambitions for libraries across North Yorkshire.

We want our libraries to be places where people can exchange, share, learn and create ideas in the heart of their communities. The first choice for people wanting to find out, learn, enjoy and read with skilled teams to support them.

Your library, your place is the draft libraries strategy for 2020-2030. Developed with partners, volunteers and other stakeholders, the strategy recognises the move to a service delivered in partnership with communities as well as the changing use of libraries. It also demonstrates our commitment to investing in libraries as a community resource able to support our wider ambitions for people in North Yorkshire.

Draft plan

  View the draft plan (pdf / 2 MB) (pdf / 2 MB).

This consultation ended on Monday, 20 January 2020


As part of our annual budget consultation we’re inviting people to have their say on whether we should increase council tax before setting our budget for next year.

We hope that the consultation will also give people a better understanding of the financial challenges we continue to face, with uncertainty around future funding and an increase in demand for services.

Give us your views

Alternative formats are available on request by contacting our customer service team.

Deadline for comments

Take part by Monday, 20 January to make sure your comments are included when the budget is discussed at the full council meeting in February. 

This consultation ended on 15 March, 2020


This consultation is about North Yorkshire's ideas for Targeted Mainstream Provisions for children and young people with SEND (Special Educational Needs and Disabilities).

We want all children and young people with SEND in the county to:

  • have the best educational opportunities so that they achieve the best outcomes.
  • be able to attend a school or provision locally, where they can make friends and be part of their local community.
  • make progress with learning, have good social and emotional health and be prepared for a fulfilling adult life.

We know that there are more children and young people being identified as having special educational needs in North Yorkshire and we expect this increase to continue. We need to make sure that we have the right type of education provision in the right place to meet their needs. We know that a number of our children and young people have to go to school outside North Yorkshire, and we want to avoid this wherever possible.

We have developed a strategic plan for educating children with SEND which aims to create a better offer of provision for children and young people, improved communication, enable more local decision making, and reduce costly out of county placements. This plan was approved in September 2018 and we are now implementing the actions within it.

We now want to ask your views on the further development and proposed implementation of one aspect of provision set out in the strategic plan.

This document explains the proposal that we are consulting on. You can read the full strategic plan document so that you can see where this aspect of provision fits within the wide range of provisions established or being developed. We recommend that you read this document and ideally attend one of the information events before responding to the survey and giving us your views.

Our Intention for SEND education provision 

Targeted Mainstream Provision

Targeted mainstream schools will provide enhanced levels of specialist support over and above that usually available in mainstream schools. They will provide an appropriate environment and personalised support for children and young people with SEND, who are able to access mainstream learning.

The staff within the school will be highly trained in SEND and will have access to SEND professionals such as educational psychologists, speech and language and occupational therapists.

These provisions will provide places for children and young people who are not requiring a special school place but need the additional support referenced to access a mainstream school curriculum.

Since October 2018, we have been working with schools and academies to develop plans for how the new provisions will be delivered. We have worked with our existing Enhanced Mainstream Schools in the first instance as well as with new schools interested in becoming a Targeted Mainstream Provision.

Delivery of this model is reliant upon schools to host the provision and work with us in partnership. This consultation is to provide more detail on progress to date and seek views on establishing the first nine bases.   

In developing the proposals we have:

  • Developed a different model of targeted mainstream provision to allow children and young people to receive more specialist support in small groups while being able to access aspects of a mainstream curriculum and the school community.
  • Engaged with interested schools to identify those schools who wish to implement the new model in the first phase - September 2020 onwards.
  • Developed an agreement detailing how schools will be funded and service standards expected.
  • Identified additional therapies and support needed to assist schools in delivering high quality provisions, including educational psychology as well as occupational and speech and language therapies.

What will the provision look like?

Schools have the flexibility to refine their model of delivery, but in general the new provision will:

  • Provide a minimum of eight full time places for six children and young people with an Education, Health and Care Plan and two ‘flexible’ places for children needing to access the provision for short-term assessment and support.
  • Specialise in meeting the needs of children and young people with social, emotional and ,mental health or communication and Interaction needs at primary and secondary level.
  • Have access to a range of therapies and training opportunities to ensure children are fully supported.
  • Increase the opportunities for children and young people with SEND to access mainstream education together with more specialised small group interventions and support.
  • Be funded on a ‘place’ basis similar to special schools and in line with national guidance. They will receive £10,000 per place and top up funding in accordance with our banding system. We expect the top up funding to be between £4,780 to £7,570 per place based on banding levels as of the 2019/2020 financial year.

And:

  • Children who access the flexible placements will remain on the roll of their own school.

Each targeted provision will receive direct funding of approximately £120,000 to 130,000 per year.

Which schools would like to deliver the new provisions and which localities are they in?

When the new model is fully implemented in the next two to three years, we expect to have 31 targeted mainstream provisions as shown below:

Locality Primary C&I Secondary C&I Primary SEMH Secondary SEMH
 Hambleton/Richmondshire 1 1 1 1
 Scarborough area 1 1 1 1
 Whitby 1 1 1 1
 Ryedale 1   1 1
 Selby 1 2 1 1
 Craven 1 1 1 1
 Harrogate/Knaresborough/Ripon 2 1 2 1

In Year 1 we have nine schools which have expressed an interest and these are listed below. Subject to this consultation, and appropriate implementation, these targeted mainstream provisions will be established from January 2021.

Locality Primary C&1 Secondary C&1 Primary SEMH Secondary SEMH
 Hambleton/Richmondshire Alverton Primary Wensleydale   Thirsk/PRS
 Scarborough area       Scalby/PRS
 Whitby East Whitby Academy   West Cliff Academy  
 Ryedale        
 Selby   Holy Family   Selby High School
 Craven        
 Harrogate/Knaresborough/Ripon Grove Road CP      

How outreach support will continue to be offered throughout North Yorkshire

We have restructured the central local authority SEND and Inclusion teams to create locality based teams (Hubs) of SEND professionals including specialists, specialist teachers and practitioners, speech and language, occupational and educational psychologists.

These teams, under the management of a locality based SEND Manager will work with schools and settings to identify children with SEND at the earliest stage and ensure they receive the support they require.

Staff within the teams will also be responsible for undertaking the statutory assessment process.

The teams will have a local base and will be accessible for parents/carers and schools and settings in terms of advice and support.

In summary the teams will:

  • Work with schools and settings to identify children with SEND at the earliest stage and ensure they receive the right support at the right time.
  • provide advice and guidance to schools and settings as well as parents with concerns.
  • offer outreach to settings and schools in response to referrals.
  • deliver early intervention advice and support.
  • deliver training and professional development to schools and settings to enhance expertise and capacity to meet the needs of children and young people with SEND.
  • model interventions with school staff.
  • offer group sessions and training for children and young people and parents/carers.
  • provide a targeted rapid response.
  • provide a range of therapies.

SEND Hubs will begin operation in April 2020, prior to the current Enhanced Mainstream School’s being decommissioned. This has been done so that those young people who continue to need outreach support can have a planned transition to the new way of accessing this.

Who are we consulting?

We are asking for your views on our proposals, and specifically want to hear from:

  • parents, carers and young people.
  • staff in early years settings, schools and further education settings (e.g. colleges), including governors.
  • parent and carer groups, including North Yorkshire Parents and Carers Together.
  • local authority staff.
  • health colleagues.

What is the timescale?

The consultation will be open for 39 days starting on 6 February 2020 and running until 15 March 2020, allowing for school half term. Once the consultation has closed, we will review all of the responses and prepare a report for councillors. They will consider the feedback on the proposed strategic plan and make decisions on 24 March 2020 about implementing the proposals. If the proposed implementation is agreed by councillors we will begin to undertake the necessary steps to change the designation of schools involved and begin implementation.

How to take part in our survey

We are conducting a survey which is both available online and in printed form. If you would like a paper copy of the survey or an alternative format, please call our customer service centre.

Events for parents, carers and professionals

We are holding events for parents, carers and professionals around the county to talk about the proposals.

Events for parents and carers

Date Time Location

11 February 2020

1pm to 2pm The Esplanade Hotel. Belmont Rd, Scarborough YO11 2AA

24 February 2020

10.30am to 11.30am

Cedar Court Hotel, Park Parade, Harrogate HG1 5AH

24 February 2020 1.30pm to 2.30pm

Herriots Hotel, Broughton Rd, Skipton BD23 1RT

25 February 2020

 10.30am to 11.30am 

South Milford Hotel, Junction 42 A1M, South Milford, Leeds, Yorkshire, United Kingdom, LS25 5LF

25 February 2020

1.30pm to 2.30pm The Golden Lion Hotel, 114 High St, Northallerton DL7 8PP

Event for current Enhanced Mainstream School Staff

Date Time Location

3 March 2020

3.30pm to 5pm The Grand, County Hall, Racecourse Lane, Northallerton, DL7 8AD

Events for school staff and other education professionals

Date Time  Location
11 February 2020 2.30pm to 3.30pm The Esplanade Hotel. Belmont Rd, Scarborough YO11 2AA

24 February 2020

9am to 10am

Cedar Court Hotel, Park Parade, Harrogate HG1 5AH

24 February 2020

3pm to 4pm Herriots Hotel, Broughton Rd, Skipton BD23 1R

25 February 2020

9am to 10am

South Milford Hotel, Junction 42 A1M, South Milford, Leeds, Yorkshire, United Kingdom, LS25 5LF

25 February 2020

3pm to 4pm The Golden Lion Hotel, 114 High St, Northallerton DL7 8PP

Information about Equalities Impact Assessment (EIA)

We have carried out an  equalities impact assessment (EIA) (pdf / 365 KB). We will update this following comments received during the consultation and councillors will consider it again before they make a decision on implementing the proposal. The EIA has identified that there will be an impact on young people with SEND and if changes are made to current SEND education services, we will offer support to families to adapt to those changes.

We anticipate that, if the proposal is implemented, it may bring positive impacts to young people and their families, particularly by enabling more young people with SEND to be educated in their own community and achieve better outcomes.  We anticipate that with more local provision children and young people with SEND will have more opportunities to attend a local school that is closer to home and will help them achieve better educational and social outcomes.

Easy Read Version

 Easy Read version of the consultation document (pdf / 882 KB)

Give Us Your Views

Take part in our online survey

Consultations from 2019

This consultation ended on 21 January, 2020


By the end of the decade, our spending power will have fallen by 34 per cent. Although demand for council services has increased, the funding we receive from central government has reduced significantly.

Further funding cuts mean we’re now facing more difficult decisions on how we can make additional savings and prioritise spending on services whilst also protecting the most vulnerable people in North Yorkshire. The projected budget shortfall of almost £200m by 2021-22 has been met in part by achieving £157m of savings so far. However, a further £40m will need to be found to meet the remaining funding gap.

With this challenge in mind we want your views on how we manage our budget for 2019-20.

Consultation documents

Alternative formats are available on request by contacting our customer service team.

Give us your views

You can give us your views using our online survey.

 

Deadline for comments

Take part by Monday 21 January to make sure your views are considered by the council’s executive when they meet on 29 of January.

Responses received after this date will still be included and shared with full council when it meets on Wednesday 20 February.

A consultation pack will be sent direct to members of the citizens' panel.

This survey closed on 6 December, 2019.


A consultation on proposed school admission arrangements for community and voluntary controlled schools for 2021-2022

In accordance with our statutory legal duty, we are consulting on proposed school admission arrangements for community and voluntary controlled schools for 2021-2022.  This consultation closes on 6 December 2019.

Consultation documents

  Proposed policy (appendix 1) (pdf / 320 KB) (pdf / 320 KB)

  Proposed nursery policy (appendix 2) (pdf / 263 KB) (pdf / 263 KB)

  Proposed coordinated admissions arrangement 2021-22 (appendix 3) (pdf / 795 KB) (pdf / 795 KB)

  Proposed in-year fair access protocol (appendix 4) (pdf / 765 KB) (pdf / 765 KB)

  Proposed primary published admission numbers (appendix 5) (pdf / 131 KB) (pdf / 131 KB)

  Proposed secondary published admission numbers (appendix 6) (pdf / 106 KB) (pdf / 106 KB)

  Proposed catchment area changes Admiral Long CE Primary School and Ripley Endowed CE Primary School (appendix 7) (pdf / 1 MB) (pdf / 1 MB)

  Proposed catchment area change to Malton School (appendix 8) (pdf / 1 MB) (pdf / 1 MB)

Give us your views

If you have any comments or queries please email nicola.howells@northyorks.gov.uk

Voluntary Aided, Foundation, University Technical Colleges, Free Schools and Academies

Admission arrangements for voluntary aided, foundation, university technical colleges, free schools and academies is a matter for the schools’ governing bodies as the admission authority for the school.  Any comments relating to these schools should be addressed directly to the school in question. Contact details can be found on the relevant school website.

The following schools are currently consulting on their admission arrangements until 6 December 2019 (policies for these are attached)

  Thomas Hinderwell Primary Academy (pdf / 659 KB) (pdf / 659 KB)

  Selby Community Primary (pdf / 270 KB) (pdf / 270 KB)

  Tockwith Church of England Primary Academy (pdf / 491 KB) (pdf / 491 KB)

  The Boyle and Petyt Primary School (pdf / 550 KB) (pdf / 550 KB)

  Carlton Endowed CofE Primary School (pdf / 1 MB) (pdf / 1 MB)

  St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School, Whitby (pdf / 270 KB) (pdf / 270 KB)

  St Augustine’s Roman Catholic School, Scarborough (pdf / 646 KB) (pdf / 646 KB)

  Holy Family Catholic High School, Carlton (pdf / 269 KB) (pdf / 269 KB)

  Egton Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School (pdf / 1 MB) (pdf / 1 MB)

  St Martin’s Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School (pdf / 402 KB) (pdf / 402 KB)

This consultation ended on 6 November, 2019


The requirement includes screening services for STIs (Sexually Transmitted Infections) and STDs (Sexually Transmitted Diseases), GUM (Genito-Urinary Medicine) and Contraception and Sexual Health (CaSH) services.

North Yorkshire County Council wishes to put in place a formal partnership (referred to as a “Section 75 Partnership Agreement”) with York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust to work collaboratively to deliver the fully Integrated Sexual Health Service responsibility on behalf of the council. This partnership agreement will delegate sexual health services to York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. The NHS and Local Authorities Partnership Arrangements Regulations 2000 stipulate that “the partners may not enter into any partnership agreements [under Section 75 (S75) of the NHS Act 2006] unless they have consulted jointly such persons as appear to them to be affected by such arrangements”.

Scope

North Yorkshire County Council and York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust are jointly consulting for the purpose of the proposed collaborative arrangement.  This is a 30-day consultation beginning on 7 October 2019 and ending on 6 November 2019. For any questions about this consultation please email nypublichealth@northyorks.gov.uk

The Section 75 Agreement will be a partnership agreement with current Provider York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust under Section 75 of national Health Services Act 2006, to work collaboratively to continue to deliver a fully integrated sexual health service. The agreement will also involve the setting up of a joint management board between North Yorkshire County Council and York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust to oversee the agreement, improve integrated pathways and ways of working and develop a joint accountability framework. The Partnership Agreement itself will not directly affect the service model.

How to respond

Our short survey is available to complete.

Compliance with government and local practice on consultationThe Section 75 Agreement is planned to be in place, subject to the outcome of the consultation, from 1 April 2020.

The consultation has been set at 30 days which is considered sufficient time to enable interested parties to respond to this particular consultation. The proposal is to put in place formal partnership working for the Service in North Yorkshire through a Section 75 Agreement. The Section 75 Agreement is planned to be in place, subject to the outcome of the consultation, from 1 April 2020.

Summary

The Integrated Sexual Health Service (also referred to as a ‘one-stop-shop’) includes all health screening and treatment, contraceptive services, outreach services for young people and vulnerable groups, counselling, HIV support and sexual health promotion and information. North Yorkshire County Council wishes to enter into a formal collaborative agreement to allow York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust to continue to deliver the Integrated Sexual Health Service on the Authority’s behalf. In keeping with good practice and NHS Act requirements, the Council and the Trust, as potential partners, are required to consult with stakeholders who may be affected by such an agreement being in place. The Partnership Agreement itself will not directly affect the service model.

Background

We understand people want and deserve the best possible public services, which protect and improve their health and wellbeing. In the NHS Act of 2006, Section 75 identifies 2 flexibilities which can enable partnership agreements to develop to give National Health Service organisations and local authorities the flexibility to be able to respond effectively to improve services, either by joining up existing or developing new, co-ordinated services. The intention of a Section 75 Partnership Agreement is to improve services for users through either ‘pooled budgets’ (where two organisations bring together resources) and/or ‘delegated functions’ (where one organisation exercises an agreed function on behalf of another).

The intention of the partnership arrangement is to offer flexibility to support better coordination and innovative approaches in services across a range of NHS and Local Authority functions. Ultimately we want to improve the health and wellbeing outcomes for people who use services and we believe that the most effective approach for delivering these outcomes is through a partnership arrangement to ‘delegate’ functions from the Council to York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. You can read the full North Yorkshire County Council Cabinet report detailing the background behind the proposed agreement. 

Current provision and benefits of a partnership approach

The Integrated Sexual Health Service currently provides open and booked access to sexual health testing, treatment and contraception to all ages in North Yorkshire.

This includes sexual health promotion and information (which provides evidence based sexual health information to service users), clinical assessment (medical and sexual health history including a risk assessment is undertaken for all service users accessing the service), contraceptive services (including pregnancy testing and counselling, male and female condoms and lubricant, emergency oral contraception, emergency intrauterine device (IUD) insertion, prescribing of hormonal contraception including oral, transdermal and transvaginal methods, injectable contraception, copper and medicated IUD/IUS insertion and removal, diaphragm fitting, contraceptive implant, natural family planning information, and the management of complex contraceptive problems), condom distribution scheme (promoting and providing free condoms, the use of condoms to high-risk groups and promoting the double-dutch method), STI services (including immunisations against Hepatitis A and B, and HPV (Human Papilloma Virus), accurate diagnostic tests, clinical management and partner notification for transmittable diseases), targeted sexual health services for young people up to 25 and vulnerable groups, psychosexual health counselling service, community outreach service for the most at risk populations, HIV positive support service, training service (training for the wider sexual health system to ensure they have an understanding and awareness of current and local sexual health issues and service knowledge, as well as advanced training to primary care professionals), and sexual health campaign support and awareness raising.

York Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is currently contracted by North Yorkshire County Council to provide the Integrated Sexual Health Service (as outlined above) in North Yorkshire until 31 March 2020. York Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is very experienced and has established a high quality, well regarded integrated sexual health service across North Yorkshire which is continually reviewed to explore ways of improving service delivery. The service is performing to expectations and often above, delivering the KPIs within the contract.

The responsibility for Integrated Sexual Health Services transferred from Primary Care Trusts to North Yorkshire County Council in April 2013. With this responsibility, we want to take the opportunity to continue to provide effective, high quality, value for money services to residents of North Yorkshire under a Section 75 Agreement. The proposed Partnership Agreement between the Council and York Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust will allow the NHS trust to provide the Sexual Health services on the Council’s behalf. We believe this will enable both organisations to develop the best approach to continue to deliver high quality cost effective care to our residents and visitors. The agreement itself will not directly affect current service provision or planned service developments.

Duration of consultation

This will be a 30-day consultation beginning on 7 October 2019 and ending on 6 November 2019. It is hoped that the consultation and related feedback will enable formal agreements to be in place from 1 April 2020.

Consulting with stakeholders

The consultation document and questionnaire will be available on the North Yorkshire County Council Partnerships and YorSexualHealth (brand name of York Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust current sexual health provider) websites, so any member of the public can comment on the proposals. Hard copies of the consultation document can be obtained by contacting nypublichealth@northyorks.gov.uk.

After the consultation closes

Consultation responses and feedback will be collated and reviewed by North Yorkshire County Council and York Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. At the end of the consultation period both organisations will review the feedback and produce a summary report showing the themes and issues raised. This will be reported to North Yorkshire County Council Executive and York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Board before a final decision is reached. All consultation responses will be treated in confidence and will be kept securely for one year from the closure of the consultation, then destroyed. A summary of the consultation responses and next steps will be available to view online or please contact us using one of the methods outlined above to request details.

References

This consultation closed on 23 August 2019


We are consulting on HARA Section 75 which are required for when the service commences by 30 September 2019.

Harrogate Rural Alliance is a partnership involving:

  • Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust which provides acute services and a range of community service across the district;
  • NHS Harrogate and Rural District Clinical Commissioning Group, the body which buys most healthcare services delivered in the district;
  • North Yorkshire County Council who commission and provide social care services;
  • Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust, the local specialist mental health provider; and
  • Yorkshire Health Network, which represents GPs across the district.

The vision for the programme is that it will:

“Deliver an integrated operating model that brings together community health and social care services for adults in Harrogate and Rural District. Services will be aligned to defined primary care networks to create an enhanced local offer that delivers benefit for the population through maximising the local resource and assets”

The partners have a shared vision of a timely transformation towards an integrated approach to commissioning and provision of health care, public health and social care services in Harrogate and Rural District. The partners believe that co-ordinating their planning, commissioning and delivery activities will help facilitate the best use of resources to support the local resident and patient population.  

The ambition for the programme is that the new integrated service will:

  • Have prevention as the starting point.
  • Develop a new model, anchored in primary care, based on prevention, planned care and unplanned care, optimising all available resource.
  • Provide care at home wherever possible.
  • Focus on population health as opposed to organisations.
  • Be a Primary Care Practice Centred Model (hybrid model between practices and geography).
  • Include primary care daily involvement and commitment
  • Have active involvement from people who use services and carers.

Section 75 of the 2006 NHS Act gives powers to local authorities and clinical commissioning groups to establish and maintain pooled funds out of which payment may be made towards expenditure incurred in the exercise of prescribed local authority functions and prescribed NHS functions.

Section 75 of the Act also gives powers to local authorities and clinical commissioning groups to:

  • establish and maintain pooled funds out of which payment may be made towards expenditure incurred in the exercise of prescribed local authority functions and prescribed NHS functions;
  • establish integrated commissioning arrangements and to establish integrated management functions in relation to health and social care services.

The purpose of the draft Section 75s is to put in place the arrangements required to govern and manage shared planning and commissioning and delivery of integrated services, supported by an indicative set of core and aligned budgets in the geography of Harrogate and Rural District.

The Harrogate and Rural Alliance Board (HARAB) will be the vehicle through which all parties will discharge their shared responsibilities in respect of working together within the defined financial schedules. The Agreements apply to the defined health, public health and social care services supplied to the residents of North Yorkshire County Council and to patients registered with the GP Practices within the Harrogate and Rural District.

The draft agreement  ‘HaRD_NYCC_Section75_V16.1 240719 Commissioner’ (pdf / 2 MB) is between North Yorkshire County Council (NYCC) and Harrogate and Rural District Clinical Commissioning Group (HARD CCG) outlining the respective commissioner arrangements.

The draft agreement  ‘HDFT_NYCC_Section75_V3.1 240719 Provider’ (pdf / 2 MB) is between North Yorkshire County Council (NYCC) and Harrogate District Foundation NHS Trust outlining the respective provider arrangements.

The Section 75 agreements are required for when the service commences by 30 September 2019.

Consultation Documents

 HaRD NYCC Section 75 V16.1 240719 - Commissioner - revised draft for publication (pdf / 2 MB) (pdf / 2 MB)

 HDFT NYCC Section 75 V3.1 240719 Provider - revised draft for publication (pdf / 2 MB) (pdf / 2 MB)

Give Us Your Views

If you would like to make any comments or share you views regarding the draft Section 75 agreement please email: integration@northyorks.gov.uk

This consultation closed on 4 November, 2019.


We are seeking to commission / procure new services for people with lived experience of mental health issues from 1 October 2020.

North Yorkshire County Council Health and Adult Services currently commissions Mental Health Supported Houses Services. 

There are nine mental health supported housing contracts across North Yorkshire; five of which are designated properties, and four of which are floating support in people’s homes. In addition we also deliver a service in Harrogate. 

Their purpose is to provide housing-related and other support in order to enable people with mental health issues to maximise and sustain their independence in the community, and also support them to achieve their rehabilitation and recovery goals. 

The current services were commissioned in October 2016 through an open competitive process for a three year period with a possible one year extension to September 30, 2020. 

Deadline for comments

The closing date for this survey is Monday, 4 November 2019. 

This consultation closed on 29 November 2019.


The proposals include changes to the over-subscription criteria and to the testing arrangements. The policy under consultation is for entry in September 2021, which will affect applicants sitting the Year 7 Entrance Test in September 2020.

The consultation will run until 12pm on Friday, 29 November 2019. A copy of the proposed admission arrangements and a commentary outlining some of the key changes in the proposal can be found below. Copies of both documents can be found on the school website.

Consultation Documents

 2020-21 Admissions Policy - Consultation (pdf / 1 MB)

 Ermysted’s Grammar 2020-21 Admissions Commentary (pdf / 577 KB)

Give us your views

Governors welcome responses to this consultation either by emailing consult@ermysteds.n-yorks.sch.uk or writing to:

Mr C Worts,
Chair of Governors,
Ermysted’s Grammar School,
Gargrave Road,
Skipton,
BD23 1PL

Deadline for comments

All responses to this consultation should be submitted by 29 November, 2019.

This consultation closed on Friday, December 6, 2019.


In 2015 we worked with autistic people, families, carers and social and healthcare professionals to create a five year plan for autism. This was called The Changing Landscape of Autism in North Yorkshire: North Yorkshire autism strategy 2015-2020. 

Since 2015 we have been working with the community and other professionals to implement the strategy across North Yorkshire.

As we reach the end of the five years, we have been thinking about the things we said we would do, how well we did and where we need to do better. We are also starting to think about the next five years and what our priorities need to be until 2025. 

Update on The Changing Landscape of Autism in North Yorkshire

We have written a report to remind people what we said we would do, summarise what we have done and outline any actions which we still need to look at.

Here is the  Changing Landscape of Autism in North Yorkshire (pdf / 534 KB) report.

We have written a summary for each theme of the current plan. These are available for download below:

 Support for people with autism and their families (pdf / 474 KB)
 Assessment and diagnosis (pdf / 467 KB)
 Raising awareness and training (pdf / 473 KB)
 Information and signposting (pdf / 465 KB)
 Employment and education (pdf / 465 KB)
 Supporting people with autism through key life changes (pdf / 473 KB)
 Working together (pdf / 462 KB)

A copy of the summaries for each theme will shortly be available to download in easy read.

What’s happening next?

From Tuesday 8 October to Friday 6 December 2019 we are talking to people about how we have done on this strategy and what we need to look at as part of the next one.

We want to hear from people on the autism spectrum, parents, carers, friends and family members, health and social care professionals, voluntary and community sector organisations and anyone else who with an interest in autism and supporting autistic people.

How can I get involved?

Attend a local forum or drop-in session.

We are running a series of forums for anyone who would like to come and talk about autism in North Yorkshire. Each forum will involve a short presentation and some group discussion about what to do next.

All forums will be autism friendly, with opportunities for people to drop-in before or after the group discussions if you’d prefer a quieter or more informal chat.

Town Date Venue Drop-In Group Discussions
Easingwold Wednesday 23 October Easi Works 1pm to 1:30pm and 3:00pm to 3:30pm 13:30pm to 3pm
Northallerton Thursday 7 November The Goosecroft Centre 9:15am to 10:15am and 11:30am to 12noon 10:00am to 11:30am
Tadcaster Thursday 7 November The Barn 9:30am to 10:15am and 12noon to 12:30pm 10:30am to 12noon
Ripon Thursday 31 October Ripon Community House 10:00am to 10:45am and 12:45pm to 1:15pm 11:00am to 12:30pm
Malton Tuesday 12 November Friends Meeting House 9:30am to 10:15am and 12noon to 12:30pm 10:30am to 12noon
Selby Tuesday 12 November Community House 9:30am to 10:15am and 12noon to 12:30pm 10:30am to 12noon
Harrogate Thursday 14 November The Cuttings 12noon to 1:30pm 10:15am to 11:45am
Scarborough Thursday 14 November The Scarborough Bowls Centre 9:30am to 10:15am and 12noon to 12:30pm 10:30am to 12noon
Catterick Tuesday 19 November Catterick Leisure Centre 9:30am to 10:15am and 12noon to 12:30pm 10:30am to 12noon
Richmond Wednesday 20 November Richmond Cricket Club 9:30am to 10:15am and 12noon to 12:30pm 10:30am to 12noon
Pickering Friday 22 November Pickering Memorial Hall 9:30am to 10:15am and 12noon to 12:30pm 10:30am to 12noon
Whitby Tuesday 26 November The Coliseum 9:30am to 10:15am and 12noon to 12:30pm 10:30am to 12noon
Skipton Thursday 28 November The Soroptimists 9:30am to 10:15am and 12noon to 12:30pm 10:30am to 12noon
Settle Wednesday 27 November Victoria Hall 9:30am to 10:15am and 12noon to 12:30pm 10:30am to 12noon

 

If you would like to register your attendance at one of these sessions please let us know. You can also let us know if there is anything we can do to support you or the person you care for to attend.

Completing a survey

We have created a survey so people with autism, their friends and family, and professionals who work with autistic people can tell us how we did and what we need to think about in the next five years. We want to hear from people all across North Yorkshire to make sure people have a say in what happens next.

Here is the survey that you can complete. This is the  easy read version of the survey (docx / 3 MB).

Email Us

If you would like to request a copy of the survey in another format, or if you have any feedback you would like to send us or if you would like us to visit you at a voluntary group or community organisation, you can contact the team at autismmatters@northyorks.gov.uk. If you would prefer to speak to someone please call 01609 535995 and we will arrange a phone call to speak to you at a convenient time.

This consultation closed on 3 December 2019


We were asking for your views to lower the age range of pupils from 4-11 to 3-11 with effect from 1 January 2020.

The primary school proposed to provide places for 3-4 year olds by the creation of a combined Nursery/Reception/Year 1 class.

The executive members for education and skills on 3 December 2019 approved proposals:

  • To lower the age range of Burton Salmon Community Primary School from age 4-11 to 3-11 with effect from 1st January 2020.

The reasons for this decision, which were set out in their report, were education standards and the views of interested parties.

Statutory notice

Comments on the statutory notice can be sent to:

Strategic Planning - Children and Young People's Service
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
DL7 8AD

Notice documents

Deadline for comments

The consultation opens on 24 October 2019. You should give us your views on these proposals by 5pm on 21 November 2019.

This consultation closed on 18 November 2019


As part of our annual budget consultation and the development of our council plan we’re inviting people to have their say on how we should prioritise our key ambitions.

The council plan sets out our priorities and actions for the next four years. It explains how we intend to deliver services that meet the needs of people in North Yorkshire. View the council plan here.

We want people to share their views on which areas they think we should focus our resources against a backdrop of ongoing austerity.

Give us your views

Alternative formats are available on request by contacting our customer service team.

Deadline for comments

Take part by Monday 18 November to make sure your comments are included when the council plan is discussed at the full council meeting in February.

This consultation closed on 13 October 2019


We are now inviting you to share your views on the proposed changes to medical tuition.

We recommend that you read a copy of the consultation document and/or attend one of the information events before responding to this survey.

You can request this information in another language or format here.

Consultation Events

We are holding the following consultation events where you can find out more about the proposals and provide feedback. Please note the events are split into two parts as outlined below:

Locality Area Date Venue Time Audience
Selby 12 September 2019 The Regen Centre, Landing Lane, Riccall, YO19 6PW

a) 12pm to 1:30pm

b) 2pm to 3:30pm

a) Parents, Carers, Children and Young People

b) Professionals

Craven 17 September 2019 The Tempest Hotel, Elslack Lane, Skipton, BD23 3AY

a) 12pm to 1:30pm

b) 2pm - 3:30pm

a) Parents, Carers, Children and Young People

b) Professionals

Harrogate 19 September 2019 The Old Swan Hotel, Swan Road, Harrogate, HG1 2SR

a) 12pm to 1:30pm

b) 2pm to 3:30pm

a) Parents, Carers, Children and Young People

b) Professionals

Scarborough 20 September 2019 The Crown Spa Hotel, The Esplanade, Scarborough, YO11 2AG

a) 12pm to 1:30pm

b) 2pm to 3:30pm

a) Parents, Carers, Children and Young People

b) Professionals

Hambleton / Richmond 24 September 2019 The Golden Lion, 114 High Street, Northallerton, DL7 8PP

a) 12 to 1:30pm

b) 2pm to 3:30pm

a) Parents, Carers, Children and Young People

b) Professionals

Ryedale 25 September 2019 The Talbot Hotel, Yorkersgate, Malton, YO17 7AJ

a) 12pm to  1:30pm

b) 2pm to 3:30pm

a) Parents, Carers, Children and Young People

b) Professionals

Consultation Documents

 MES Consultation Summary Document (pdf / 725 KB)

 Medical Model Consultation Easy Read Version (pdf / 1 MB)

 Medical Model EIA Final (pdf / 391 KB)

Give us your views

You can give us feedback on the consultation through our online survey.

You should give us your views on these proposals by 13 October 2019.

This consultation closed on 20 February 2019.


By the end of the decade, our spending power will have fallen by 34 per cent. Although demand for council services has increased, the funding we receive from central government has reduced significantly.

Further funding cuts mean we’re now facing more difficult decisions on how we can make additional savings and prioritise spending on services whilst also protecting the most vulnerable people in North Yorkshire. The projected budget shortfall of almost £200m by 2021-22 has been met in part by achieving £157m of savings so far. However, a further £40m will need to be found to meet the remaining funding gap.

With this challenge in mind we want your views on how we manage our budget for 2019-20.

Consultation documents

Alternative formats are available on request by contacting our customer service team.

 

This consultation closed on 8 July 2019.

Read full details of the Harrogate congestion engagement.


The complexity of the area’s traffic issues means they are unlikely to be addressed by a single solution so, for illustrative purposes, we have developed two indicative packages which combine a range of measures. At this stage these have not been fully defined or developed.

The measures have been specifically selected as having the potential to help alleviate the issues identified in the local area.

studyarea.jpg

Download a  map of the Harrogate study area. (pdf / 2 MB)

A lot of people commute into and out of Harrogate

A lot of trips are made into and out of Harrogate, with people living in the town travelling to work elsewhere (particularly to York and Leeds) and those working in the town often living elsewhere where property prices are lower. This leads to  high levels of traffic, and resulting congestion, on the main routes in and out of Harrogate.

The existing road network wasn’t designed to deal with so much traffic

Key routes through Harrogate and Knaresborough (A59, A61 and A661) carry much more traffic than they were designed to. For a variety of reasons, such as the Stray, in most cases it is not possible to improve the existing roads to provide for all this traffic, so it is necessary to look at other ways of addressing the problem.

Our research shows that journeys in the morning and evening are the main cause of the traffic issues but there are problems throughout the day

Unlike many places, research shows that Harrogate and Knaresborough experience traffic congestion issues on some  main roads throughout the day as well as in the morning and evening peak hours. There is a considerable variation in journey time depending on the time of day. Journey times can be up to 145% longer in the peak hours (8-9am and 4.45-5.45pm), with average speeds as low as 5.5mph; this means that, not only are journeys slow, but they are also unpredictable, which can cause issues for commuters and deliveries.

A lot of journeys are very short, made within the towns themselves and made by car

Almost half of the trips being made in the busiest periods both start and end within Harrogate and Knaresborough. These trips are short (less than 1.6miles on average), are generally commuter trips and are mostly made by car.  These trips are the ones most easily shifted to more sustainable modes (walking, cycling or public transport); this would make a big difference to the level of congestion on the roads.

There are currently low levels of cycling

Cycling is a great alternative to the car for short trips, yet levels of cycling in Harrogate and Knaresborough are low. Accident data shows a relatively high number of pedestrian and cyclist casualties. This has been considered when developing the possible measures to help with congestion; if cycling can be made safer and more convenient (through better provision such as cycle lanes and by reducing the number of cars on the roads) there is potential to encourage more people to travel by bike.

Bus use in Harrogate is low

Only 6% of the short commuting trips made within Harrogate are on a bus - and this  is decreasing year-on-year despite having premium services like the 36, which offers comfortable seating, phone charging and free Wi-Fi. As with cycling, measures to make bus use more attractive are included  to try to encourage people to make better use of existing services.

There are air quality issues in the area

High traffic flows and resulting congestion are a key contributor to air quality issues on the main routes in the area. This has led to the need to declare a number of ‘Air Quality Management Areas’, which correspond to some of the junctions where, according to our research, congestion is worst.

The number of cars on the road is expected to increase

The population is growing. Housing developments and employment sites planned for Harrogate and Knaresborough mean the population is expected to increase significantly. These people will need to travel on the local network. Whilst smaller scale local improvements might address the direct impacts of this development, in the longer term extra traffic will add to congestion, delays and longer journey times.

Congestion is impacting the economy

There is an aspiration to grow Harrogate’s economy. It could be difficult to attract developers to an area that is difficult to get to because of congestion, which would have repercussions for the growth and diversification of the economy.

Doing nothing doesn’t mean nothing changes

Doing nothing doesn’t mean that nothing changes. Housing and employment growth in and around Harrogate and Knaresborough and further afield will continue. Travel patterns and behaviour will change over the coming years. The nature of the British economy is likely to change.

National traffic forecasts suggest that traffic in Britain will grow by between 17% and 51% by 2050. Nothing suggests that this will not be reflected in Harrogate and Knaresborough. All this means that traffic and therefore congestion in Harrogate and Knaresborough is likely to continue to get worse.

Over the last 30 years, since the Harrogate Southern Bypass was built, the County Council has undertaken numerous relatively small scale measures to help manage congestion. These have included junction improvements, providing new cycle routes, upgrading and updating traffic signals, providing facilities for bus passengers, making improvements to local railway and railway stations and promoting safe and sustainable transport. We will continue to do this, as part of our role as local transport and highway authority.

The packages being considered as part of the engagement would, subject to funding being available, offer a more joined up and comprehensive approach to congestion reduction in Harrogate and Knaresborough but even if no package was adopted, the County Council would continue to promote similar smaller measures as we have in recent years. This will mean incremental improvements to traffic and congestion management, but not anything more substantial than that.

This consultation closed on 16 June 2019.


We transport around 20,000 pupils every day. The total cost of transport in 2017/18 was £22.6 million and our forecasts show that the total for 2018/19 is likely to be £24.7 million.

Last year we held a public consultation about making changes to our home to school transport policy for young people with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND). We have started to implement the proposals agreed last year. The SEND Transport consultation highlighted areas in which the authority is delivering above the minimum requirements.

We are now consulting on the discretionary help we provide above and beyond the statutory requirements. 

The changes we are consulting on will help the council to make long-term savings and bring our home to school transport service in line with Department for Education statutory guidelines, to ensure the local authority is allocated the correct funding from central government.

We are asking questions in the survey below, about our proposals and for any other ideas and suggestions. We can also provide paper copies of the survey and accessible formats of the survey on request.

This consultation will run between Monday 25 March 2019 and Sunday 16 June 2019. Any responses received after this time may be considered but not included in the consultation.

Consultation documents

It is advised you read the  consultation document (pdf / 525 KB) before completing the below survey. 

Consultation events 

We are also hosting a number of public events, booking is not required. 

Date Area Venue Time
3 April 2019 Scarborough Falsgrave Community Resource Centre, Seamer Rd, Scarborough YO12 4DH 12pm-2pm
Scalby School, Fieldstead Crescent, Scarborough YO12 6TH 5pm-7pm 
4 April 2019 Skipton The Rendezvous Hotel, Keighley Road, Skipton BD23 2TA 12pm-2pm
5pm-7pm
30 April 2019 Whitby The Green Lane Centre, Green Lane, Whitby YO22 4EH 12pm-2pm
5pm-7pm
9 May 2019 Harrogate Pavilions of Harrogate, Railway Road, Great Yorkshire Showground, Harrogate HG2 8NZ 12pm-2pm
5pm-7pm
14 May 2019 Selby Community House, Portholme Crescent, Selby YO8 4QQ 12pm-2pm
5pm-7pm
15 May 2019 Pickering Memorial Hall, Potter Hill, Pickering YO18 8AA 12pm-2pm
5pm-7pm
17 May 2019 Richmond Richmond Town Council, Town Hall, Market Place, Richmond DL10 4QL 12pm-2pm
5pm-7pm
23 May 2019 Northallerton Allerton Court Hotel, Darlington Rd, Northallerton DL6 2XF 12pm-2pm
5pm-7pm

If you can’t attend an event you can email h2stransportconsult@northyorks.gov.uk. Please title your email ‘Home to School transport consultation’. 

You can also write to ‘Home to school transport consultation’, c/o  SB205 Home to School Transport North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE. 

If you would like the information about the proposals or the survey questions in another language or format, or if you would like printed copies, please ask us - call 01609 780780 or email h2stransportconsult@northyorks.gov.uk 

Additional information and documents 

This consultation closed on 30 May 2019. 


A consultation on statutory proposals by the Governing Body of Bishop Thornton Church of England Primary School to transfer to a new site at Burnt Yates (the former premises of Burnt Yates Church of England Primary School).

The executive members for education and skills on 25 June approved proposals:

  • To transfer Bishop Thornton CE Primary School to a new site at Burnt Yates near Harrogate, North Yorkshire, HG3 3EJ (the former premises of Burnt Yates Church of England Primary School) from 1 September 2019.

Statutory proposals

The Governing Body of Bishop Thornton Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School has approved the publication of a statutory notice and proposals to transfer Bishop Thornton CE Primary School to a new site at Burnt Yates (the former premises of Burnt Yates Church of England Primary School) on 1 September 2019.

Consultation documents

Statutory notice

The executive have approved the publication of a statutory notice on 4 April 2019 regarding proposals to lower the age range of pupils from four to 11 to three to 11 with effect from 1 September 2019. 

This will give a further four weeks for representation to be made. Any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by 5pm on 2 May 2019. 

Comments on the statutory notice can be sent to:

Strategic Planning - Children and Young People's Service
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
DL7 8AD

Notice documents 


On 21 May 2019, the County Council’s Executive resolved that:

  1. The four key issues listed at paragraph 8.2 of the report had been satisfied and therefore the proposal could be determined.
  2. The age range of Thornton in Craven Community Primary School be lowered to age 3-11 with effect from 1st September 2019.

This consultation closed on 30 April 2019.


The Scarborough Park & Ride service was introduced as part of the Scarborough Integrated Transport Scheme on 14 February 2009. There are two park & ride sites which are located on the outskirts of Scarborough on the A64 and the A165.

The service is currently available seven days a week all year round, including Bank Holidays except for Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day. Buses run every 15 minutes, following a circular route stopping at South Bay and the town centre before returning to the park & ride sites.

Initially the park & ride service had a significant positive impact with over 533,000 passenger journeys in 2011-2012. Since 2012 there has been a steady decline in passenger numbers to 272,100 passenger journeys in 2017-2018. The passenger usage shows a considerable seasonal split with 215,900 (79%) of those journeys being between the second Sunday before Easter to the second Sunday in November.

Promotional and publicity work undertaken by the bus operator has had limited success in increasing usage. In view of the reduced usage we are reviewing the service provision to ensure that it is appropriate for the current demand. The two services cost £437,000 a year to run and North Yorkshire County Council’s Business and Environmental Services Corporate Director and Executive Member have agreed to consult on three options for the future.

The following options are being considered:

Option Proposal
Option 1 Completely close both the A64 Seamer Road site and A165 Filey Road site.
Option 2a Completely close A64 Seamer Road site.
It is anticipated that some usage will transfer from this site to the A165 site.
Option 2b Completely close A165 Filey Road site.
It is anticipated that some usage will transfer from this site to the A64 site.
Option 3 Operate seasonal services only. This will mean that no service will operate from either site from second Sunday in November to second Sunday before Easter and both sites will be closed during this time.

Consultation documents

For full details please see the consultation document below.

 Scarborough Park and Ride service consultation - proposed changes. (pdf / 508 KB)

Deadline for comments

The consultation opens on 8 February 2019. You should give us your views on these proposals by 5pm on Tuesday 30 April 2019.

This consultation closed on 14 April 2019.


At a meeting on 29 November 2018 the governing body of Clapham Church of England voluntary controlled primary school voted to seek to consult on the school’s closure. The governing body has requested that the council begin consulting on a proposal to close the school at the end of the current academic year.

We are asking for your views on the proposal to close the school at the end of the current academic year (from 31 August 2019).

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

Deadline for comments

The consultation opens on 14 February 2019. You should give us your views on these proposals by Thursday 4 April 2019.

Consultation meeting

There will be a public meeting about the proposals on Thursday 7 March 2019 at 6.00pm at Clapham CE VC Primary School, Lancaster, LA2 8EJ.

This consultation closed on 15 March 2019.


At a meeting on 15 November 2018 the governing body of Arkengarthdale Church of England voluntary controlled primary school unanimously voted to seek to consult on the school’s closure, because pupil numbers have fallen to an unsustainable level.

The executive members for education and skills on 25 June approved proposals:

  • To cease to maintain Arkengarthdale CE VC Primary School with effect from 31 August 2019.
  • To extend the catchment area of Reeth Community Primary School with effect from 1 September 2019 to serve the area currently served by Arkengarthdale CE VC Primary School.

Statutory notice

The executive have approved the publication of a statutory notice on 2 May 2019 regarding these proposals. This will give a further four weeks for representation to be made. 

Notice documents

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

Deadline for comments

The consultation opens on 25 January 2019. You should give us your views on these proposals by 5pm on Friday 15 March 2019.

Consultation meeting

There will be a public meeting about the proposals on Monday 18 February 2019 at 6.30pm at Arkengarthdale CE VC Primary School, Richmond DL11 6EN.

This consultation closed on 15 February 2019.


We are allocated money from the Department for Education special provision capital fund. This is a standalone amount of money which has to be spent to improve existing facilities, develop new facilities, or create additional places for special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) education provision.

It can only be used in provision judged as good or outstanding by Ofsted to benefit young people with SEND who have an education health and care plan.

We will receive a total of £616,279 over three years. We have already allocated the money for 2018-19 (£163,000) and we now want to ask for views on our proposals for spending the remaining money (£453,279).

We have to publish our plan by 29 March 2019 to ensure we receive this money from the Department for Education.

Our proposals for using this money are based on helping to achieve some of the outcomes outlined in our  strategic plan for SEND education provision (pdf / 3 MB). This plan outlines how we will develop our education provision for children and young people with SEND in North Yorkshire. The number of children and young people identified as having SEND, including those with education health and care plans is increasing.

The special provision capital fund is separate capital funding from the government, specifically to help us create much needed SEND education places and improve facilities for children with education health and care plans.

This funding is not part of the high needs budget.

We will use this small amount of capital funding to maximum effect, to create more local education provision, so that young people can learn in an inclusive environment, within or near to their own community wherever possible.

The proposals

Our proposals for years two and three are about:

  • work at Brooklands Community Special School in Skipton; and
  • work for the proposed satellite provision for Mowbray School in Ripon.

Consultation documents

Frequently asked questions and answers

What is the special provision capital fund?

The special provision capital fund is money allocated to the council by the Department for Education. It is a standalone pot of money specifically to help us create much needed SEND education places and improve facilities for children with education, health and care plans. This funding is not part of the high needs budget.

What can we use this money for?

The special provision capital fund has to be spent to improve existing facilities, develop new facilities, or create additional places for special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) education provision. The money can only be used in provision judged as good or outstanding by Ofsted to benefit young people with SEND who have an education health and care plan.

You can read guidelines from the Department for Education on how we must spend the money here.

We cannot use the funding for things like increasing places for children and young people who do not have education, health and care plans, or for furniture, teaching resources, training and staff costs. The guidelines give more information on this.

The proposals for years 2 and 3 of the special provision capital fund don’t include any work in Selby. How is the Council planning to improve education provision for children and young people with SEND in the Selby area?

Our Strategic Plan for SEND education provision 0-25 sets out how we will develop education provision for children and young people with SEND in all areas of North Yorkshire, including Selby.

The Council recognises the need to improve provision for children and young people with SEND in the Selby area. 

As a result we have made a bid to the Department for Education for a special free school in the Selby area – we expect to hear the outcome of this soon. Our Strategic Plan also sets out how we will develop targeted provision for children and young people in Selby.

Why isn’t the fund being used to provide staff or training for staff to support children and young people with SEND?

The SPCF is capital funding we receive from the Department for Education. There are clear guidelines about how we can use the funding. The SPCF must be used to benefit children and young people with Education, Health and Care Plans and to:

  • create additional places at provision judged good or outstanding, and
  • improve facilities or develop new facilities.

We cannot use the funding for staff costs or for training.

The Government has allocated more special provision capital funding to local authorities. What are the council’s plans for this funding?

In December 2018 the Government announced that an additional £100 million funding would be allocated to local authorities. We found out after the start of the consultation on years 2 and 3 of the fund, that North Yorkshire’s additional allocation would be £232,558.

We will consider proposals for this additional funding and ask for views on how to spend it in due course.

The Government has updated the guidelines for the funding to reflect the additional allocation

Deadline for comments

You can give us your views on these proposals between 7 January and 15 February 2019.

This consultation closed on 21 January 2019.


We are consulting on proposals about how people who use adult social care services contribute to their costs. The consultation covers two main areas:

  • the cost of transport to places where people may receive a service; and
  • how the total cost of care is calculated.

We are seeking your views on our proposals before we take any final decisions in 2019. Your views will be fed back to county councillors, so they are made aware of what you think before they take any decisions. Decisions have not yet been made.

We would like to hear your views about our proposals and any other ideas and suggestions you might have. You can tell us what you think by completing the survey below. There is an ‘easy read’ version available and other formats can be provided upon request.

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

Deadline for comments

You should give us your views on these proposals by 21 January 2019.

Consultation events

We are holding a number of events where we will explain the proposals and ask people what they think. The dates and locations of the events are:

Date Time Location
13 November 9.30am Council Chambers, County Hall, Northallerton DL7 8AD
14 November 2pm Main Function Room, Richmond Cricket Club, Hurgill Road, Richmond DL10 4AR
15 November 1pm The Council Chambers, Civic Centre, St Lukes Avenue, Harrogate HG1 2AE
19 November 10am The Council Chambers, Ryedale District Council, Ryedale House, Old Malton, Malton YO17 7HH
27 November 10.30am Hall B, The Street, 12 Lower Clark Street, Scarborough YO12 7PW
4 December 12.30pm Community House Selby, Community House, Portholme Road, Selby YO8 4QQ
7 December 10am Civic Suite, Craven District Council, 1 Belle Vue Square, Broughton Road, Skipton BD23 1FJ

All venues have wheelchair access. There will be BSL interpreters at the events in Harrogate, Scarborough and Selby.

This consultation closed on 8 February 2019.

The executive members for education and skills on 12 March 2019 approved proposals:

  • To amalgamate Moorside Infant School and Moorside Junior School in Ripon to create a single 3-11 Primary School on the junior school site on 29 April 2019.
  • To create satellite specialist provision from Mowbray School on the Moorside Infant School site from 1 January 2020.

Statutory notice

The executive have approved the publication of a statutory notice on 11 January 2019 regarding these proposals. This will give a further four weeks for representation to be made. The executive will make a final decision on the proposals on 19 February 2019.

You can comment on the statutory notice from 11 January to 8 February 2019 by writing to:

FREEPOST RTKE-RKAY-CUJS
Moorside Schools
Strategic Planning
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
NORTHALLERTON
DL7 8AE

The formal consultation closed on 9 November 2018.

Original consultation details

This would create a single three to 11 primary school on the junior school site (to be known as Moorside Primary School and Nursery) through the technical closure of Moorside Infant School as a separate entity and the enlargement and change of age range of Moorside Junior School.

This proposal is linked to proposals set out in another consultation to create specialist satellite SEND provision from Mowbray School on the Moorside Infant School site.

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

This consultation closed on 8 February 2019.


Statutory notice

The executive have approved the publication of a statutory notice on 11 January 2019 regarding these proposals. This will give a further four weeks for representation to be made. The executive will make a final decision on the proposals on 19 February 2019.

You can comment on the statutory notice from 11 January to 8 February 2019 by writing to:

FREEPOST RTKE-RKAY-CUJS
Mowbray School
Strategic Planning
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
NORTHALLERTON
DL7 8AE

The formal consultation closed on 9 November 2018.

Original consultation details

Our strategic plan for special educational needs or disabilities (SEND) education provision 2018 to 2023 includes proposals to create new special school provision through working towards the establishment of satellite specialist provision in the Ripon area during 2018-19. The initial proposal is to establish up to 30 places in 2019-20. This will then rise to up to 60 places by 2021-22.

Mowbray is a special school at Bedale, making provision for a wide range of complex special educational needs or disabilities. Mapping of the current cohort of children and young people attending Mowbray School shows a number live in the Ripon area and potentially could benefit from this provision in addition to those requiring this type of provision into the future.

This proposal is linked to proposals set out in another consultation to amalgamate Moorside Infant School and Moorside Junior School to create a single three to 11 primary school on the junior school site.

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

The executive members for education and skills on 12 March 2019 approved proposals:

  • To amalgamate Moorside Infant School and Moorside Junior School in Ripon to create a single 3-11 Primary School on the junior school site on 29 April 2019.
  • To create satellite specialist provision from Mowbray School on the Moorside Infant School site from 1 January 2020.

This consultation closed on 31 January 2019.


We are currently consulting on behalf of the following own admission authority schools on their admission arrangements for 2020 to 2021. Comments should be submitted to the relevant school directly.

Voluntary aided schools

School Deadline for comments
 St Martin's CE, Scarborough (pdf / 48 KB) 17 December 2018
 St Augustine's RC School, Scarborough (pdf / 16 KB) 17 December 2018
 Dacre Braithwaite CE (VA) Primary School, Summerbridge, Harrogate (pdf / 2 MB) 14 January 2019
 St Robert's Catholic Primary School, Harrogate (pdf / 795 KB) 31 January 2019
 Holy Family Catholic High School, Carlton (pdf / 241 KB) 31 January 2019
 St Wilfrid's Catholic Primary School, Ripon (pdf / 692 KB) 31 January 2019

Academy schools

School Deadline for comments
 Richmond School (Areté Learning Trust) (pdf / 570 KB) 31 January 2019
 Stokesley School (Areté Learning Trust) (pdf / 572 KB) 31 January 2019
 St Aidan's Church of England High School, Harrogate (pdf / 100 KB) 31 January 2019
 Selby Community Primary School (pdf / 49 KB) 31 January 2019
 Richard Taylor Church of England Primary School, Harrogate (pdf / 99 KB) 31 January 2019

Sixth form policies

School Deadline for comments
 Ermysted’s Grammar School, Skipton (pdf / 751 KB) 21 January 2019

Give us your views

Any comments about a particular policy should be sent for the attention of the governing body of the school in question by the deadline given. You can find school details here.

Consultations from 2018

This consultation closed on 20 December 2018.


We are asking for your views on how we keep young people in North Yorkshire happy, healthy and safe.

The focus for our 0 to 19 healthy child service is the whole population of children and young people in North Yorkshire. It is available to all families, children and young people and aims to ensure that every child gets the good start they need to lay the foundations of a healthy life.

The programme aims to:

  • help parents develop and sustain a strong bond with children;
  • support parents in keeping children healthy and safe and reaching their full potential;
  • protect children from serious disease, through screening and immunisation;
  • reduce childhood obesity by promoting healthy eating and physical activity;
  • identify health and wellbeing issues early, so support and early interventions can be provided in a timely manner;
  • focus on the health needs of children and young people ensuring they are school ready (SEND code of practice 0 to 25 years, 2017); and
  • make sure children are prepared for and supported in all child care, early years and education settings and especially are supported to be ‘ready to learn at two and ready for school by five'.

Our current providers of healthy child services can be seen here.

Why we are asking for your views

The current healthy child contracts will end in March 2020, which gives us the opportunity to review the services currently available.

We want to ask your views on the services you have experienced, either as a young person, or a parent, carer, relative or key stakeholder. This will help us to write new service descriptions to ensure that we are providing the right services to meet the needs of families in North Yorkshire.

The first part of the process is taking place now, which includes asking you to tell us about your experiences informally. Then, in 2019 there will be a formal consultation where you can tell us your views on our proposals for the services that will be provided under the healthy child programme.

Following the consultation, your views will be taken into account to inform how services are delivered from 1 April 2020. 

This consultation closed on 7 December 2018.


A consultation on proposed school admission arrangements for community and voluntary controlled schools for 2020-21.

Voluntary aided, foundation, trust schools and academies

Admission arrangements for voluntary aided, foundation, trust schools, university technical colleges, free schools and academies is a matter for the schools’ governing bodies as the admission authority for the school. Any comments relating to these schools should be addressed directly to the school in question. Contact details can be found on the relevant school website.

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

Decision notice

A decision has now been made for taken for the admission arrangements for the 2020/2021 school year.

This consultation closed on 22 November 2018.


A proposed expansion to Overdale Community Primary School in Eastfield, Scarborough through using a site at Ashmead Square, Eastfield YO11 3EY from 1 September 2020.

The expanded school will continue to provide for pupils aged three to 11.

Notice documents

Decision notice

A decision has now been taken to approve the expansion of Overdale Community Primary School.

This consultation closed on 11 November 2018.


A consultation on proposals for changing how we allocate some aspects of the high needs budget, to support children and young people with special educational needs or disabilities (SEND).

All local authorities have a duty to keep their special education provision under review and ensure there is the right type of provision and enough places to meet the needs of children and young people with special educational needs and / or disabilities (SEND). 

In order to meet this duty, we have developed the strategic plan for SEND education provision. The plan includes actions to develop special educational provision in North Yorkshire and to have more local provision for children and young people.

We have a budget of £44.8 million to spend on special educational provision. This is called the high needs budget and is allocated by central government. There is significant financial pressure on this budget due to the increase in the number of children and young people who have been assessed as needing an education, health and care plan. However funding from central government has not increased in line with increased demand. The strategic plan helps us to make sure we can make the best provision possible with the funding we have whilst ensuring we meet the assessed needs of children and young people.

As set out in the plan we are reviewing and reshaping the high needs budget. This will be an ongoing process as we implement the plan but we now want to consult on the following three specific proposals for change:

  • Changing the process for top up funding for children and young people with education, health and care plans from a resource allocation system to a banding system;
  • Changing the way provision for secondary aged pupils who are permanently excluded or at risk of permanent exclusion is commissioned and funded in North Yorkshire; and
  • Bringing arrangements for provision and funding for young people with education, health and care plans receiving post-16 education, into line with statutory guidance.

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

You can also read some frequently asked questions and answers on the consultation:

Frequently asked questions

What is the consultation about?

We’re asking for your views on some proposals for changes to how we spend the ‘high needs budget’. This is money we get from central government to spend on education for young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND).

When is the consultation?

The consultation started on 5 October and runs until 11 November 2018.

What are the proposed changes?

We want to ask you about possible changes in three areas:

  • changes to the system we use to allocate ‘top up’ funding to young people;
  • changes to the way we pay for the education of secondary school aged students who are at risk of exclusion; and
  • changes to the number of hours of tuition we pay for, for young people over the age of 16 with education, health and care plans.

Why are we doing this?

We have to ensure that the increasingly pressurised high needs budget is spent in the most effective and efficient way possible to meet the assessed needs of children and young people.

There is significant financial pressure on this budget due to the increase in the number of children and young people who have been assessed as needing an education, health and care plan. However, funding from central government has not increased in line with increased demand. We have a long-term strategic plan which helps us to make sure we can make the best provision possible with the funding we have, whilst meeting the assessed needs of children and young people.

What do the proposals mean for young people with education, health and care plans in post-16 education?

For young people with education, health and care plans in further education or sixth form there will be no change in their education package. These students currently receive 16 hours per week / 600 hours a year of education. Further education providers are paid for 16 hours of teaching but sixth forms are paid for 25 hours. We propose to correct this anomaly by funding only the 16 hours per week that the students receive.

Young people post-19 will receive at least the same package as they currently do. The children and young people’s service and health and adult services will agree a personalised support programme for each young person after they reach the age of 19.

For young people with education, health and care plans in post-19 provision who require a five day package of education and care, this will continue where it is required based on the assessed needs of young people. The proposal is around changes to how the package is funded, which will be partly from the high needs budget, and partly by health and adult services. Further details can be found in the  consultation on high needs budget (pdf / 108 KB) document.

What are we doing to make sure young people’s opinions are heard?

We are writing directly to all young people with SEND over the age of 16 with an education, health and care plan and we are holding consultation sessions with young people in pupil referral service settings. We are also writing to the parents and carers of all other young people with an education, health and care plan. We have a young persons’ consultation group called ‘Flying High’ and we consult directly with members of this group. We are also working with special schools via their head teachers and SENCOs in mainstream schools, who will work with the young people in their school to help record their views. We’ve also asked young people in North Yorkshire to tell us what they think via a targeted Facebook campaign. If any of the information is needed in a different format we will do our best to provide it.

How can I take part?

There are several ways you can tell us what you think about the proposals - all the details can be found on this page.

We would like as many people as possible to come to one of our events and fill in the online survey before 11 November 2018.

Will you listen to feedback provided during the consultation?

We welcome all feedback so that the recommendations we make will take into account your views. All feedback is considered and used to shape our final recommendations.

How was information about the consultation on these changes published and promoted?

All the consultation information and the survey are on our website, including on the SEND local offer pages. This includes accessible versions of the information. You can also request paper copies of the information and survey, and in other formats (braille, BSL etc.) if you need them.

Before the consultation began, information was sent to all schools in North Yorkshire (including pupil referral services) about the consultation, with a link to the website. They were asked to share the information with parents and carers and young people with SEND.

Information was sent to NYPACT, the parent / carer forum, as the consultation began, with a request to share it with parents and carers.

Shortly after the consultation began letters were sent to parents and carers and young people as appropriate, to reinforce the messages already in place.

There have been regular reminders on social media and a media release was shared via the NY Now resident e-newsletter and local free press pages, with a link to this web page and details on how to take part in the consultation.

There have been consultation events across the county that anyone can attend.

What will the impact of the change to bandings be for children and young people who have top up funding determined by the CAN-DO?

We will continue to meet our statutory duty for children and young people and will ensure provision set out in an education heath and care plan is made.

We have completed some modelling and think there will be little impact on amounts of top up funding for individual children and young people. The banding system will make the process clearer for everyone and make sure top up funding is at the right level to meet the needs identified in an education heath and care plan.

We would expect all children and young people who currently have education heath and care plans to receive top up funding at band 4 or above according to their needs.

What is alternative provision?

Alternative provision is for children of compulsory school age who do not attend mainstream or special schools full time and may be accessing other provision for learning off site e.g. with vocational providers or within pupil referral services.

We are responsible for arranging suitable education for permanently excluded children and for other children who - because of illness or other reasons - would not receive suitable education, without such arrangements being made. Currently this is provided by a range of providers including enhanced mainstream schools, pupil referral services and other models of alternative provision led by groups of schools.

Frequently asked questions about specific proposals

Proposal one - changing the process for top up funding for children and young people with education, health and care plans from a resource allocation system to a banding system.

How was the proposed banding model developed?

We have looked at a number of models used by other local authorities and considered how these allocated top up funding to meet the needs of children and young people. The model used by Bradford does this in the clearest way. We have developed the proposed model for North Yorkshire taking the Bradford model into consideration.

Proposal two - changing the way provision for secondary aged pupils who are permanently excluded or at risk of permanent exclusion is commissioned and funded. 

The changes proposed to the way provision for secondary aged pupils who are permanently excluded or at risk of permanent exclusion is commissioned and funded would take place over a very short time period. How will this be managed?

Depending upon the feedback from the consultation, and if council members approved the proposal, we would introduce the changes from April 2019. We recognise that it would take time to make the changes so we would give some transitional funding to pupil referral services and alternative provision providers until the end of March 2020.

What will happen for children and young people with medical needs?

Our strategic plan sets out the actions we will take for children and young people with medical needs. You can read the plan here.

We intend to:

  • update the guidance for schools about pupils with medical needs;
  • look at the way young people with medical needs are referred so that it is clear for all partners;
  • introduce a different model for home tuition for pupils with medical needs which offers increased hours of tuition where appropriate (there will be a separate consultation about this proposal); and
  • revisit how we provide longer term education for children who cannot attend school due to their medical needs.

We will continue to provide places for pupils with medical needs in pupil referral services and alternative provision providers until the end of the academic year 2019-20 and there will be a separate consultation on changes to this provision in due course.

We’re here to listen so please tell us what you think - your opinion matters.

This consultation closed on 9 November 2018.


Consultation on a proposal to create specialist satellite SEND provision for four to 11 year olds for Mowbray School at Moorside Infant School.

Statutory notice

The executive have approved the publication of a statutory notice on 11 January 2019 regarding these proposals. This will give a further four weeks for representation to be made. The executive will make a final decision on the proposals on 19 February 2019.

You can comment on the statutory notice from 11 January to 8 February 2019 by writing to:

FREEPOST RTKE-RKAY-CUJS
Mowbray School
Strategic Planning
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
NORTHALLERTON
DL7 8AE

Original consultation details

Our strategic plan for special educational needs or disabilities (SEND) education provision 2018 to 2023 includes proposals to create new special school provision through working towards the establishment of satellite specialist provision in the Ripon area during 2018-19. The initial proposal is to establish up to 30 places in 2019-20. This will then rise to up to 60 places by 2021-22.

Mowbray is a special school at Bedale, making provision for a wide range of complex special educational needs or disabilities. Mapping of the current cohort of children and young people attending Mowbray School shows a number live in the Ripon area and potentially could benefit from this provision in addition to those requiring this type of provision into the future.

This proposal is linked to proposals set out in another consultation to amalgamate Moorside Infant School and Moorside Junior School to create a single three to 11 primary school on the junior school site.

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

The executive members for education and skills on 12 March 2019 approved proposals:

  • To amalgamate Moorside Infant School and Moorside Junior School in Ripon to create a single 3-11 Primary School on the junior school site on 29 April 2019.
  • To create satellite specialist provision from Mowbray School on the Moorside Infant School site from 1 January 2020.

This consultation closed on 9 November 2018.


Consultation on a proposal to amalgamate Moorside Infant School and Moorside Junior School to create a single primary school.

Statutory notice

The executive have approved the publication of a statutory notice on 11 January 2019 regarding these proposals. This will give a further four weeks for representation to be made. The executive will make a final decision on the proposals on 19 February 2019.

You can comment on the statutory notice from 11 January to 8 February 2019 by writing to:

FREEPOST RTKE-RKAY-CUJS
Moorside Schools
Strategic Planning
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
NORTHALLERTON
DL7 8AE

Original consultation details

This would create a single three to 11 primary school on the junior school site (to be known as Moorside Primary School and Nursery) through the technical closure of Moorside Infant School as a separate entity and the enlargement and change of age range of Moorside Junior School.

This proposal is linked to proposals set out in another consultation to create specialist satellite SEND provision from Mowbray School on the Moorside Infant School site.

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

The executive members for education and skills on 12 March 2019 approved proposals:

  • To amalgamate Moorside Infant School and Moorside Junior School in Ripon to create a single 3-11 Primary School on the junior school site on 29 April 2019.
  • To create satellite specialist provision from Mowbray School on the Moorside Infant School site from 1 January 2020.

This consultation closed on 19 September 2018.


A consultation on proposed locations where 4G LTE mobile coverage will be developed.

As part of our work to improve mobile coverage within the county we are looking at developing 4G LTE coverage in areas where this is not yet present, and where it is unlikely that industry will invest in the near to medium term future, given the economic challenges of doing so. The programme also seeks to ensure that any infrastructure delivered will support the 5G world through being capable of upgrade.

We are consulting on the proposed locations where 4G LTE coverage will be developed. We are keen to hear from those who may be able to support the provision of this network infrastructure in the target areas. This could be through ownership of specific telecommunications infrastructure or have plans to build such infrastructure.

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

This consultation closed on 13 July 2018.


A consultation on enhanced parental transport allowance for home to school transport.

From 8 January to 2 April 2018, we consulted on some potential changes to our home to school transport policy. The new policy was approved by the council on 16 May 2018 with changes being implemented from September 2018. You can read about the county council meeting where they agreed to the transport policy here.

However, councillors have requested a further short consultation to clarify one aspect of the new policy - the introduction of a voluntary enhanced parental transport allowance for certain families whose school aged children with an education health and care plan would be eligible for, and require, additional transport assistance.

Once the consultation has closed, we will review all of the responses and prepare a report to enabled elected members to reach a decision.

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

This consultation closed on 11 July 2018.


A consultation on the draft specification for the re-procurement of the specialist adult drug and alcohol service, North Yorkshire Horizons.

The current adult substance misuse service, North Yorkshire Horizons, was commissioned in October 2014 and consists of two contracts:

  • Recovery and mentoring service, provided by Change Grow Live; and
  • Drug and alcohol treatment service, provided by Developing Initiatives Supporting Communities.

The contracts operate as an integrated service with a shared brand, a single point of contact, shared service hubs, shared policies and protocols, and a shared electronic case management system.

The contracts were let for three years with a two year extension facility which was activated in 2017. The contracts end on 30 September 2019.

We wish to re-procure a comparable service to commence on 1 October 2019. The service will continue to be called North Yorkshire Horizons.

You can find out more about the consultation via the North Yorkshire Partnerships website here.

This consultation closed on 28 June 2018.


A consultation on our strategic plan for education of children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities, 2018 to 2023.

We have a duty to keep our special educational provision under review and to make sure there is the right type of provision and enough places to meet the needs of children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). You can find out more about our special educational needs and disabilities services here.

We have worked with parents and carers, schools and other education providers, professionals working in the area of SEND, and children and young people themselves to develop a new strategic plan. It is the result of many conversations and opportunities to share views and opinions, and has been shaped over time.

We are now inviting you to share your views on the proposed strategic plan, which sets out what we will do to develop and improve education provision for children and young people with SEND aged 0 to 25 in North Yorkshire.

We recommend that you read a full copy of the strategic plan and attend one of the information events before responding to this survey.

This short video gives a very brief explanation of the draft strategic plan for SEND and how to give us your views on it:

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

This consultation closed on 19 June 2018.


A consultation on changes to the provision of overnight short breaks for families with disabled children and young people.

We provide a range of short break services for disabled children and their families, including day time and overnight care for disabled children, in their own homes and elsewhere. We support those who provide care for them, both at times of crises and with their family life.

Information on short breaks for disabled children and young people, including our short breaks statement, is available here.

Demand from children and families to use the overnight short breaks at the Ghyll children’s resource centre in Skipton has fallen in recent years and is predicted to fall further. We need to ensure that the services we provide replicate a home-like environment and continue the current high quality experience. This is very difficult when such a small number of children are using the facilities. 

We have already been working to transform the short break service for disabled children and families, with the development of hubs to provide a range of both day and overnight care, holiday programmes, specialist foster carers and more personalised budgets. The proposal includes a plan for further investment in the Nidderdale children’s resource centre in Harrogate, to maximise accommodation for overnight short breaks for those children currently using the Ghyll children’s resource centre and Beck House. If the plans go ahead, social workers will work with families to review their support and ensure any changes to overnight short breaks are well managed for the young people involved.

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

Frequently asked questions

You can also read some frequently asked questions and answers on the consultation:

What is the offer of transport / clarity on transport provision? Will transport to alternative bases for provision be paid for?

Transport for existing overnight users of The Ghyll will be provided by the council, or financial support will be offered to families if they prefer to transport themselves.

Will transport be appropriately staffed with trained escorts?

Where transport is provided trained escorts will be provided as appropriate.

Are there any families who meet the short breaks criteria awaiting services in Skipton?

There are some families who are awaiting day care services in the Skipton area. Some families are trying to find PAs for direct payments. The number of children without services in Skipton is very small.

What is the outreach offer?

The outreach offer will replicate some of the day care offered by The Ghyll, such as after school breaks, weekend day care and holiday day care. The service will be able to provide support in the community accessing activities, and to deliver short term pieces of targeted work to address individual needs.

How many staff will make up the outreach team?

We will review the numbers of children who will need an outreach service and will ensure that there are sufficient staff to ensure a safe service. If the decision is made to close The Ghyll consultation will take place with staff about the outreach service and the numbers of staff we think will be needed.

Where will the base be for outreach provision and what facilities will be available?

We are exploring a number of options for a base, and we will continue to have the use of the Ghyll building for the foreseeable future if the proposal is approved.

Will tea breaks still be available?

If there is an assessed need for a service after school then this will be offered through the outreach service.

Will you have sufficient foster carers recruited for special needs placements?

The fostering service will target recruitment of carers in Craven for those young people whose needs could be met in a family.

What will happen if service demand within Skipton increases again in the future?

If there is significant increased demand for overnight short breaks within Craven, these will be offered at Nidderdale, or by foster carers. If the demand for day care support increases locally then services will be reviewed and commissioned accordingly.

Will the criteria for short breaks provision be reviewed?

We have no plans at present to review the eligibility criteria.

Will transport time be part of the allotted respite time?

We would take this into account, to ensure that families still experience a meaningful short break.

What will happen if staff begin to leave the Ghyll and there aren’t enough staff to keep it open until the proposed amendments to the Nidderdale site have been completed?

Overnights at Nidd or Beck will be offered in the event that we cannot safely operate at The Ghyll. We aim to maintain day care at The Ghyll.

Will the newly developed Nidderdale site include a sensory room?

Yes a sensory room is part of the plans.

This consultation closed on 4 June 2018.


A major consultation has been launched on what the North Yorkshire Archives service of the future would look like.

Currently the county archives are housed in the County Record Office at Northallerton in a building that is in need of a complete overhaul so that it can continue to maintain important and irreplaceable documents in a secure and controlled environment. Some of the documents held are centuries old and provide a unique insight into 800 years of North Yorkshire’s history.

The archives service needs to ensure that in consulting on its future provision, it makes as many links as it can to the wider heritage offer available across the county through the wealth of established heritage groups and providers.

The service is also keen to take advantage of the greater access opportunities offered by improved broadband coverage across the county, by allowing online digital access to the service and its unique collections. The archivesd service wants to know what its partners, users and non-users would like to see provided by a digital age record office. It is also wishes to learn from the many dedicated enthusiastic heritage groups and volunteers how it can better support their needs in preserving the heritage of local communities.

Cllr Greg White, Executive Member for the Archives service says:

“I want to ensure that North Yorkshire County Council is providing the best possible place where our unique and historic collection can be preserved for use by generations to come. For this reason we need to use this opportunity to ensure that as many people as possible have the opportunity to participate in this consultation and to let us know what they would like to see delivered from the record office in the future; particularly what types of activity they would be interested in getting involved in."

This consultation closed on 19 April 2018.


These proposals follow discussions with the regional school’s commissioner and the Diocese of Leeds. We consider the closure necessary to secure the interests of current and future pupils from the school because of concerns about standards of teaching and learning and related concerns about low pupil numbers and the school’s financial position.

This decision has not been reached lightly, and not before alternatives have been considered, such as collaborating and amalgamating with other schools to make sure that good standards of teaching and learning will be available for all pupils.

Notice is given in accordance with section 15(1) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AD, intends to close Burnt Yates Church of England (Voluntary Aided) Primary School, Burnt Yates, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, HG3 3EJ on 31 August 2018.

Notice documents

The executive members for schools and children’s services at their meeting with the corporate director - children and young people’s service on 22 May determined: 

  1. To cease to maintain Burnt Yates Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School with effect from 31 August 2018; and
  2. To extend the catchment area of Ripley Endowed CE VC Primary School and Bishop Thornton CE VC Primary School with effect from 1 September 2018 to jointly serve the area currently served by Burnt Yates CE VA Primary School.

This consultation closed on 2 April 2018.


We have a statutory responsibility to provide travel assistance, from home to school, for eligible children and we are proposing to consult on the discretionary areas of our current transport policy, and how we provide travel assistance.

Recent increases in both the numbers of SEND pupils requiring transport and increases in the distances that they travel, have led to a rise in costs. Based on current trends, this will reach an annual cost of £30m by 2025. The budget for providing home to school transport for pupils with special educational needs or disability is £5m.

Information on transport for SEND children and young people, including our current policy, is available here.

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

This consultation closed on 19 February 2018.


We held an extensive engagement exercise between August and October 2017, which explored what people felt was working well with mental health services and support in North Yorkshire, and how this might be improved.

Findings from the engagement have helped inform the development of proposals for how third sector organisations will be commissioned to deliver mental health support on behalf of the council in future.

We would now like to know whether people feel that we have correctly reflected the messages we have heard and hear people’s views on how we can make best use of the available investment to support people with mental health issues in North Yorkshire.

We are particularly interested in hearing from those people who currently use local adult mental health services, or have experience of using them. We are also interested in hearing from family members and carers of people who have mental health issues, people who work for organisations that deliver mental health services and local authority and NHS staff.

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

You can read more details about the adult social care mental health services review on the North Yorkshire Partnerships website here.

This consultation closed on 18 February 2018.


A consultation on proposals for the use of special provision capital funding from the Department for Education.

North Yorkshire County Council will receive funding to increase the number of places and improve facilities for children and young people with special educational needs and / or disabilities (SEND) who have education, health and care plans.

The total amount of special provision capital funding is £500,000 which has been allocated to North Yorkshire over three years. There are specific guidelines from the Department for Education on how we can use the funding.

We would like to thank everyone who has shared their time and thoughts on our proposals, there have been a number of helpful comments and suggestions which will be taken into account.

You can  read the outcomes of the consultation responses here (pdf / 410 KB).

Consultation documents

You can request this information in another language or format here.

This consultation closed on 2 February 2018.


The county council has taken into account the outcome of the consultation but has made the difficult decision to withdraw this financial support for people that do not currently have eligible social care needs. We would rather not have to make these changes but we face considerable challenges and difficult decisions on spending and providing services. Provision of this financial support is discretionary and, if we didn’t do this, then the county council would have to find savings in other ways.  

We are putting in place the two suggestions that people told us would make this change easier to manage. These are:

  1. People in receipt of financial assistance as at 31 March 2018. The financial support will not be withdrawn until 30 September 2018 and we will continue to pay the housing support provider directly as we do now. After 30 September 2018, the payments towards this housing support will stop.
  2. We will contact everyone affected by this, including anyone awaiting a financial assessment as at 31 March 2018, to offer a full welfare benefits check and will help people to claim any benefits to which they may be entitled.

Consultation documents

This consultation closed on 15 January 2018.


We are particularly interested in hearing from voluntary and community sector organisations who provide wellbeing and prevention support or would like to in the future. We would also like to hear from people who use wellbeing and prevention services and support (both those that receive funding from North Yorkshire County Council and those which may be funded by other sources) or who may be likely to use services or support in the future, as well as from family members and carers of those who use services or support.

Consultation documents

You can read more details about the review of wellbeing and prevention services on the North Yorkshire Partnerships website here.

This consultation is closed.


As a result of the information available from the Chancellor’s budget, we estimate there is little to change the plans we made about the level of Government funding in the council’s medium term financial strategy.

We will have saved a total of over £170m over the decade by 2019-10, which represents a reduction of 34 per cent in the council’s spending power. We knew we had to save a further £43m from our revenue budget by 2019-20 and we had plans for £33m, leaving a savings gap of £10m. We now think that gap is likely to be higher. This is as a result of increases in inflation and increases in demand for:

  • services for children with special educational needs; and
  • adult social care.

We are now having to consider some very tough decisions about savings, which will include our frontline services. The vast majority of savings so far have come from back office and administration, staff and management posts, procurement changes and other general efficiencies. This is no longer possible.

We will continue to prioritise spending in all areas that deal with vulnerable people, both young and old, but the demands on an increasingly stretched budget continue to grow. More than a quarter of the county’s adult population is over 65 and 13.5 per cent are aged over 85. The need to support for older people is projected to increase dramatically in future years.

The council continues to need to invest in priority areas, including roads, broadband, giving a good start to all young people and to support the elderly and vulnerable. 

More information on our budget and how we spend it is available on our spending pages.

This consultation is closed.


We are currently consulting on behalf of the following own admission authority schools on their admission arrangements for 2019 to 2020:

Voluntary aided schools

School Deadline for comments
 Egton Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School (pdf / 59 KB) 11 January 2018
 Kirkby and Great Broughton Church of England VA Primary School (pdf / 538 KB) 11 January 2018
 St Hilda's Roman Catholic Primary School, Whitby (pdf / 251 KB) 26 January 2018
 Ermysted's Grammar School, Skipton - Sixth Form (pdf / 497 KB) 26 January 2018
 Marton-cum-Grafton Church of England VA Primary School (pdf / 176 KB) 6 February 2018

Academy schools

School Deadline for comments
 Scalby School, Scarborough (pdf / 445 KB) 11 January 2018
 St Aidan's Church of England High School, Harrogate (pdf / 232 KB) 20 January 2018

Consultations from 2017

This consultation closed on 31 October 2017.


The supporting information can still be viewed here, but you can no longer submit comments.

This consultation closed on 4 December 2017. 


In accordance with our statutory legal duty, we are consulting on proposed school admission arrangements for community and voluntary controlled schools for 2019 to 2020.

Voluntary aided, foundation, trust schools and academies

Admission arrangements for voluntary aided, foundation, trust schools, university technical colleges, free schools and academies is a matter for the schools’ governing bodies as the admission authority for the school. Any comments relating to these schools should be addressed directly to the school in question. Contact details can be found on the relevant school website.

Consultation documents

Decision notice

A decision has now been made for taken for the admission arrangements for the 2019/20 school year.

This consultation closed on 29 November 2017. 


Notice is given in accordance with section 19(1) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that North Yorkshire County Council intends to make a prescribed alteration to St Mary’s Roman Catholic Primary School, Highfield Road, Malton, North Yorkshire, YO17 7DB from 1 September 2018.

Notice documents

This consultation closed in October 2017. 


North Yorkshire County Council and NHS Hambleton, Richmondshire and Whitby Clinical Commissioning Group wish to enter into a partnership agreement to encourage greater integration and planning.

We have an agreed vision to provide a timely transformation towards an integrated approach to the provision of health care, public health and social care services in Hambleton, Richmondshire and Whitby. The parties believe that by both coordinating and integrating their planning and commissioning activities, this will help facilitate the best use of resources to support the local resident and patient population. This approach will be developed through the joint arrangements with an agreed work plan including the joint commissioning strategy.

The partnership arrangements seeks to provide for shared planning, oversight and commissioning arrangements for the people in Hambleton, Richmondshire and Whitby so more joined up decisions can be made by each organisation. The arrangements will include the ability to pool budgets between the council and the clinical commissioning group but will mainly concentrate on how both organisations can plan future decisions together that are centred around the individual.

The follow up report is item 10 on the executive’s meeting on 17 October.

You can view the executive report and further documents here.

You can also find out more from Hambleton, Richmondshire and Whitby Clinical Commissioning Group here.

This consultation closed on 2 October 2017.


From 10 July to 2 October 2017 we asked for views about how hazardous household waste disposal services should be provided in the future.

Following the consultation and recommendations made in the 'Review of hazardous waste collection and disposal service' report, from April 2018 hazardous household waste will be accepted at all 20 household waste recycling centres in North Yorkshire, and the home collection service will cease.

Information about how to dispose of hazardous waste will be available here from April 2018.

This consultation closed on 15 September 2017.


Update

On 5 December 2017, North Yorkshire County Council’s executive member for schools considered a report of the corporate director - children and young people’s service providing information upon which to make a decision on these proposals.

Having undertaken the required preliminary checks and considered the advice of the assistant chief executive (legal and democratic services), the key issues listed in the report have been satisfied; for the reasons set out in the report, being standards of teaching and learning, pupil numbers and the financial position.

The executive member resolved to:

  • Cease to maintain Skipton Ings Community Primary and Nursery School with effect from 31 December 2017; and
  • To extend the catchment area of Christ Church Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School to serve the area currently served by Skipton Ings Community Primary and Nursery School with effect from 1 January 2018.

Public notice - closure of Skipton Ings school

Notice is given in accordance with section 15(1) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AD, intends to discontinue Skipton, Ings Community Primary and Nursery School, Broughton Road, Skipton, North Yorkshire BD23 1TE on 31 December 2017.

Consultation

A consultation on the proposal to close Skipton Ings Community Primary and Nursery School from 31 December 2017.

Following a request from the school’s governing body, we are consulting on a proposal to close the school.

It is considered that the closure is necessary to secure the interests of current and future pupils from the school because of concerns about standards of teaching and learning and related concerns about low pupil numbers and the school’s financial position.

This decision has not been reached lightly, and not before alternatives have been considered, such as collaborating with other schools.

Consultation document

Supporting documents

This consultation closed on 6 September 2017. 


North Yorkshire County Council, City of York Council and the North York Moors National Park Authority are producing a minerals and waste plan, to cover the period up to 31 December 2030.

Feedback on the proposed changes

Publication is an important stage in the creation of the minerals and waste joint plan. Responses provided at previous stages have been considered, along with any new evidence, and used to finalise the plan. An independent planning inspector will examine the the publication version of the plan in public. The draft plan gave those interested the opportunity to give feedback on whether they considered the plan to be 'sound' and 'legally compliant'. Feedback at this stage was only made on grounds of legal compliance or soundness and needed to be supported with evidence to show why these tests had not been met.

Following the six week consultation from November 2016 on the draft plan, a number of proposed changes were identified. As a result it is necessary to allow further feedback on legal compliance and soundness. These are presented in an addendum of proposed changes. Feedback at this stage should only relate to proposed changes. Any feedback received will be considered by an independent inspector as part of the examination.

Consultation documents

Document Details
 Minerals and waste joint plan - addendum of proposed changes to publication draft (pdf / 2 MB) Document presenting the proposed changes to the publication draft plan.
 Sustainability appraisal - addendum of proposed changes to publication draft (pdf / 4 MB) Document presenting the sustainability appraisal of the proposed changes to the publication draft plan.
 Response form - part A (docx / 484 KB) Part A of response form to be used to provide representations on the addendum of proposed changes.
 Response form - part B (docx / 72 KB) Part B of response form to be used to provide representations on the addendum of proposed changes.
 Guidance notes for response forms (pdf / 272 KB) Guidance notes to accompany response forms A and B.
 Statement of representations procedure and statement of fact (pdf / 193 KB) Details where the plan documents can be viewed and how to respond.

Supporting information for the proposed changes includes a summary of responses to the publication document, including the authorities response and a consultation statement for the publication stage. These can both be found on the minerals and waste joint plan page.

Paper copies of the addendum of proposed changes documents can be viewed at the locations listed in the statement of representations procedure.

Previous consultation

Work on the minerals and waste joint plan started in May 2013, when we sought views on what a minerals and waste plan for the area should contain. The feedback we received during this first consultation has helped us identify the issues on which the plan should focus. The next stage was to present the issues and also provide possible options for dealing with the issues identified. This took place between February and April 2014 with an additional supplementary sites consultation in spring 2015. The result of these consultations and new evidence were used to produce a preferred options consultation which included preferred sites and this consultation took place between November 2015 and January 2016. Following this a publication draft plan was produced and consulted upon between November and December 2016. The previous consultation documents, including a summary of the responses we received can be found on the minerals and waste joint plan page.

If you would like to view previous consultations, supporting information and evidence documents please visit the minerals and waste joint plan page.

planning-logos.png

This consultation closed on 7 August 2017.


We intend to introduce a permit scheme to control works on our road network. As part of the process to do this, we are required to consult on the scheme with activity promoters (utility companies and the Highway Authority), and apparatus owners under Section 50 of the New Roads and Street Works Act (1991) as well as any other interested stakeholders.

The purpose of the consultation is to seek views and questions from those affected by the introduction of a permit scheme and other interested parties. From these responses, we will consider whether any changes are required to the permit scheme, or whether clarification of the scope or operation of the scheme is required.

The actual permit scheme has to be compliant to many different references, such as statutory instruments, regulations, codes of practice and statutory guidance, so we are very limited in changes that can be applied to the scope of the permit scheme.

Consultation document

Supporting documents

Consultation report

This consultation closed on 21 July 2017.


Notice is given in accordance with section 15(2) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that the Governing Body of Ingleby Arncliffe Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School intends to discontinue Ingleby Arncliffe Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School, Ingleby Arncliffe, Northallerton, North Yorkshire, DL6 3NA on 31 December 2017.

Consultation document

This consultation closed on 21 July 2017.


Notice is given in accordance with section 15(2) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that the Governing Body of Swainby & Potto Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School intends to discontinue Swainby and Potto Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School, Claver Close, Swainby, Northallerton, North Yorkshire, DL6 3DH on 31 December 2017.

Consultation document

This consultation closed on 20 July 2017.


Notice is hereby given in accordance with the School Organisation (Prescribed Alterations to Maintained Schools) (England) Regulations 2013 that North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AD is proposing to make a prescribed alteration to Great Ouseburn Community Primary School, Main Street, Great Ouseburn, York, YO26 9RG by lowering its age range from 4-11 to 3-11 with effect from 1 September 2017.

The Governing Body have been working closely with a local playgroup to try to find a solution to the lack of available, qualified staff. Unfortunately, to date, this has not been possible and the playgroup may now be facing closure. Governors would like to be able to offer continuity of provision at the school to meet the needs of local parents and children. Currently the youngest children that the school can admit are in the reception class. In order to take younger children into the proposed new 'foundation stage' class, the age range for the school must be lowered from 4-11year olds, to 3-11 year olds.

Consultation documents

This consultation closed on 30 June 2017.


Notice is hereby given in accordance with the School Organisation (Prescribed Alterations to Maintained Schools) (England) Regulations 2013 that North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AD is proposing to make a prescribed alteration to Stakesby Community Primary School, Byland Road, Whitby, North Yorkshire, YO21 1HY by lowering its age range from 3-11 to 2-11 with effect from 1 September 2017.

A private nursery has been successfully providing high quality provision for two year olds on the school site since 2014. This provision will transfer across to become part of the school from September 2017. This will bring it under school leadership and governance and enable continuity of high quality provision for the youngest learners within the community.

Consultation document

This consultation closed on 23 June 2017.


We plan to publish a new carers strategy in the summer which focuses on the health and wellbeing of carers. It will be an all-ages strategy, aimed at supporting carers to both continue caring and to have a life of their own.

The strategy will last from 2017 to 2022 and has been produced by the health and wellbeing board for North Yorkshire, working on behalf of local residents.

Three in five of us will be a carer at some point and almost everyone will know a family member, friend or colleague who is currently a carer.

With the help of carers and other organisations we've been finding out what's working, what needs to change and how we can do that in partnership.

As a result of this engagement with carers and partners over the last 12 months we have proposed a number of themes for the draft strategy. These are:

  • improving identification of carers;
  • improving information and advice;
  • enabling carers to take a break;
  • improving carers health and wellbeing;
  • enhancing financial wellbeing; and
  • involving carers as experts.

Consultation documents

Supporting documents

If you need further information about the strategy or have any questions please email HASconsultation@northyorks.gov.uk.

This consultation closed on 23 June 2017.


We are entering into a period of consultation and we need your help. Your views and experiences are important to our development of the dementia strategy and action plan.

It is essential we gather the opinions of:

  • people living with dementia;
  • families, friends and carers of people living with dementia;
  • health and social care professionals working with people living with dementia; and
  • the wider community.

Consultation documents

Please consider any of the following versions of the dementia strategy when completing the short survey, which should take approximately 15 to 20 minutes.

This consultation closed on 20 June 2017.


We have a contractual commitment to review fee levels with our social care providers on an annual basis. In previous years, we have approached this in different ways, ranging from a flat rate percentage increase to a fixed-rate uplift subject to financial review and on occasion no uplift has been agreed. We always have an obligation to take account of the market pressures and to consult with providers on fee levels. From April 2015 we have had new statutory responsibilities under the Care Act 2014 to shape and sustain our markets.

The position for 2017-18 is further complicated as some relevant provider lists are in the process of being renewed.

We are therefore consulting with social care providers to agree increases for the financial year 2017-18 and to agree a formula for increases up to 2020.

Organisations who have a contract following a procurement exercise are excluded from the consultation as their contract will have agreed expectations in respect of annual uplifts.

Consultation documents

This consultation closed on 9 June 2017.


A consultation on a proposal to close Ingleby Arncliffe primary school.

The governing body of Ingleby Arncliffe Church of England voluntary aided primary school has decided to consult on a proposal to close the school with effect from 31 December 2017.

The Governors have worked closely with officers from the Diocese of York and North Yorkshire County Council. They consider the closure is necessary to secure the interests of current and future pupils from the school.

Consultation documents

This consultation closed on 9 June 2017.


A consultation on a proposal to close Swainby and Potto primary school

The governing body of Swainby and Potto Church of England voluntary aided primary school has decided to consult on a proposal to close the school with effect from 31 December 2017.

The Governors have worked closely with officers from the Diocese of York and North Yorkshire County Council. They consider the closure is necessary to secure the interests of current and future pupils from the school.

Consultation documents

This consultation closed on 4 June 2017.


A consultation on proposed partnership with Scarborough and Ryedale CCG.

North Yorkshire County Council and NHS Scarborough and Ryedale Clinical Commissioning Group wish to enter into a partnership agreement to encourage greater integration and planning. We have an agreed vision to provide a timely transformation towards an integrated approach to the provision of health care, public health and social care services in Ryedale and Scarborough. The parties believe that by both coordinating and integrating their planning and commissioning activities will help facilitate the best use of resources to support the local resident and patient population. This approach will be developed through the joint arrangements with an agreed work plan including the joint commissioning strategy.

The partnership arrangements seeks to provide for shared planning, oversight and commissioning arrangements for the people in Scarborough and Ryedale so more joint up decisions can be made by each organisation. The arrangements will include the ability to pool budgets between the council and the clinical commissioning group but will mainly concentrate on how both organisations can plan future decisions together that are centred around the individual.

Consultation documents

This consultation closed on 24 March 2017.


The Governing Body of Rathmell Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School agreed on 3 April 2017 to publish statutory proposals and notices on 11 May 2017 proposing that Rathmell Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School should close with effect from 31 August 2017.

On 13 June 2017, North Yorkshire County Council’s executive member for schools approved proposals:

  • To close Rathmell CE VA Primary School from 31 August 2017; and
  • To extend the catchment area of Long Preston Endowed Church of England Primary School from 1 September 2017 to serve the area currently served by Rathmell.

Statutory notice

The statutory notice on the proposal to close the school has now been published.

Within four weeks from 11 May 2017, any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by sending them to Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton DL7 8AE, by 5pm on 8 June 2017.

It is proposed that the school should close with effect from 31 August 2017 and that the catchment area of another local school will be extended to include the current Rathmell School catchment area.

This change would take place from 31 August 2017.

The governing body has not reached the decision to initiate consultation lightly, but rather it follows much deliberation and exploring of the range of possibilities.

Consultation documents

This consultation closed on 19 March 2017.


We are consulting on a proposal to change the way we prioritise management and maintenance of public rights of way within North Yorkshire, excluding those managed on our behalf by The North York Moors and Yorkshire Dales National Parks.

Public rights of way are footpaths, bridleways and other routes that everyone can use without needing permission from landowners.

At over 6,000 km, our public rights of way network is one of the longest in the country. One of our key objectives is to make sure this important asset is safe and usable for both residents and visitors. A detailed map and other information about the public rights of way network in North Yorkshire can be found here.

In an average year, customers will report 3,000 defects, such as a broken stile or a fallen tree. Maintenance of the network is arranged by a small team of officers with support from landowners, contractors and a dedicated group of countryside volunteers.

We have had to reduce our spending by around 35 per cent over recent years and this has affected all council services, including public rights of way. As a consequence we are now looking at ways to continue managing the public rights of way network with less money.

Network categorisation

The purpose of this consultation is to ask people for their views on a new approach to categorising the public rights of way network. Doing so will allow us to focus routine maintenance in areas where paths are agreed as being more important or better used. The category of a route will also help us to plan how we respond to defects that we find or are reported to us.

We will manage the network based on sections of the paths or 'links'. We will then assign a route category as follows.

  • Each link will have a score for the key characteristic of the path. Example characteristics are safe routes to schools and paths in areas of outstanding natural beauty.
  • Each link will also have a score based on an assessment of the value placed on the link by the local community.
  • We will categorise each link based on the combination of characteristic and community value scores.
  • We will map the category banding of all routes and publish this on our website.

We have taken this approach because we think that:

  1. It is a transparent approach to assessing the entire network; and
  2. The inclusion of community value will help focus attention and resource onto parts of the network that will provide greatest benefit and value to local communities.

Measuring the value that different communities place on different routes is intended to make sure that we focus resources and effort onto paths that benefit users and local communities the most. However, it is difficult to define and measure community value, so we intend to implement our approach initially based on path characteristics alone. An important part of this consultation is to gather views over how best to measure community value in future.

Consultation documents

This consultation closed on 16 March 2017.


Elected members of the county council's executive met on 31 January 2017 and considered the outcomes of the public consultation. Following careful consideration, they agreed to publish statutory proposals to close the school from 31 August 2017.

The statutory proposals were published on 16 February 2017 to run to 16 March 2017, with a final decision being made by the executive on 28 March 2017.

The statutory proposals provide four weeks for representations to be made to the council, by 16 March 2017. The final decision was taken by the executive at their meeting on 28 March 2017.

Proposal documents

This consultation closed on 20 February 2017.


The governing body of Swainby and Potto Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School is consulting on a proposal for the creation of a single Church of England voluntary aided primary school to serve the Ingleby Arncliffe and Swainby and Potto areas.

It is proposed that a single Voluntary Aided Church of England primary school, serving children aged 4-11, would be created by the retention of Ingleby Arncliffe Church of England VA Primary School and the associated technical closure of Swainby and Potto Church of England VA Primary School. The single primary school would operate on the existing Ingleby Arncliffe school site and serve the two catchment areas currently served by both Swainby and Potto and Ingleby Arncliffe Primary Schools.

In order to maintain the historical link between the schools and the Diocese of York, the single school would retain its status as a Voluntary Aided Church of England school. This would allow the Church to continue to appoint foundation governors to the governing body and the governing body to employ staff.

The proposed name for the single school is the "Mount Grace Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School".

This change would take place from 31 August 2017 when Swainby and Potto would close as a separate school.

The amalgamated school would have a single governing body, head teacher and staff group. It would be subject to a single Ofsted inspection and would receive a single budget.

The Governing Body has not reached the decision to initiate consultation lightly and has already considered a number of alternatives. They have reached the conclusion that bringing together the two schools would be the best way to secure the interests of current and future pupils from the schools because pupil numbers.

Consultation documents

You can view the proposal in the consultation document below.

This consultation closed on 10 February 2017.


Bond End was declared an Air Quality Management Area (AQMA) in 2013. Since then North Yorkshire County Council and its partners have been pressing ahead with plans to improve the situation. We have been working with Harrogate Borough Council towards achievable solutions and used specialist consultants Mouchel to undertake detailed traffic and environmental modelling work.

The Bond End steering group consisting of representatives of the county, district and town councils was set up and the borough council has already secured a successful £237,000 bid to the Government's Clean Bus Technology Fund in partnership with local bus company Transdev, for buses operating between Harrogate and Knaresborough which go through the Bond End junction. The fund will pay for modifications on buses to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxide by at least 50 per cent.

A traffic signal improvement is one of a number of measures proposed by Harrogate Borough Council's Bond End action plan. Other measures involving directional signs, planning policy, reducing emissions of the borough council fleet, improving cycle routes and implementing methods for smarter travel choices.

Consultation documents

This consultation closed in Feburary 2017.


We gathered your feedback on the strategy through engagement sessions around the county with our customers, visitors and partner organisations.

We have reviewed all the feedback and have tried to apply the common themes that we received, including what the strategy aims to achieve, how it looks and feels, and the way it is written.

As a result, we have created a newer version of the customer strategy and would, once more, appreciate it if you could look at this version and give us some feedback using the survey below. This will mean we can finalise the strategy and keep you informed on how we are improving the ways we provide our services to North Yorkshire.

Customer strategy survey

We would like to thank you, once again, for the time and effort you have given in helping to shape our vision. It has been a pleasure being able to engage with our customers and confirm we are on the right path.

This consultation closed in January 2017. 


We have accepted the government's four-year financial settlement. The settlement is very challenging given that it represents the phased removal of the government's revenue support grant by 2020.

However, it also offers a degree of certainty and the opportunity for contingency planning during a period of extreme uncertainty. Given the national and global economic environment including the impact of Brexit, the offer will form part of the council's prudent financial management and plan to maintain sensible levels of reserves as a buffer against unforeseen events.

We are consulting on our budget for 2017-18 and as part of that consultation would like to hear from you.

Our long-term plan is to increase council tax by 3.99 per cent for each of the next three years. Two per cent of this will go towards adult social care. Most of this increase will be required to cover the government's announced increase in the national living wage, the rest will be used to fund the increasing demand. In 2015-16 we supported 7,297 older people in North Yorkshire who need long-term help with their care and support (e.g. support in dressing and eating). Currently over 40 per cent of our budget, some £136m, goes on adult social care.

The 1.99 per cent increase in council tax is more than offset by the further reduction in government grants from £59m to zero by 2020. Without this increase there will therefore be a further £5m of savings required in 2017-18 alone.

More information on our budget and how we spend it is available on our spending pages.

Consultations from 2016

This consultation closed on 21 October 2016.


The county council’s executive agreed to publish statutory proposals and notices on 5 January 2017 proposing that Horton-in-Ribblesdale Primary School should close.

Decision

On 21 February, the county council's executive considered a report containing the responses to the statutory proposals. They approved proposals:

  • To close Horton-in-Ribblesdale Church of England (Voluntary Aided) Primary School from 31 August 2017.
  • To extend the catchment area of Austwick Church of England (Voluntary Aided) Primary School from 1 September 2017 to serve the area currently served by Horton-in-Ribblesdale Church of England (Voluntary Aided) Primary School.

Update - appeal and decision

An appeal against the decision to cease to maintain Horton-in-Ribblesdale CE (VA) Primary School was referred to the Office of the Schools Adjudicator.

On 28 June 2017 the Schools Adjudicator approved the proposal that Horton-in-Ribblesdale Church of England (Voluntary Aided) Primary School should close from 31 August 2017.

The schools adjudicator's decision is available to read here.

See information about the Office of the Schools Adjudicator.

Original statutory proposals

The original statutory proposals published by North Yorkshire County Council's executive are:

Original consultation details

The governing body of Horton-in-Ribblesdale Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School has consulted on a proposal to close the school.

Consultation document

Q and A document

Background papers

This consultation closed on 26 August 2016.


We are developing a healthy weight, healthy lives strategy to address the rise in childhood and adult obesity in North Yorkshire and would like your views.

The most recent North Yorkshire joint strategic needs assessment has highlighted the worrying rise in childhood and adult obesity as an increasing problem across the county, particularly among the adult population, with North Yorkshire now being ranked 24 out of 27 shire counties for this indicator.

To address this problem, the North Yorkshire health and wellbeing board has agreed that a healthy weight, healthy lives strategy should be developed. Following a period of engagement with key stakeholders, North Yorkshire County Council's public health team has written a draft strategy you can find below.

The draft strategy presents the complexities and impact on excess weight; the opportunities for change; the patterns and trends of obesity nationally and locally; and the proposed vision, aims and priorities for tackling excess weight in North Yorkshire.

Consultation documents