View the results of previous consultations and details of next steps.

Previous 12 months consultation

This consultation closed on 15 May 2021


North Yorkshire County Council Determination of school admission arrangements for the 2022-2023 school year.

Notice is hereby given that North Yorkshire County Council, being the admission authority for all community and voluntary controlled primary, infant, junior and secondary schools in its area, have determined the admission arrangements for the 2022/2023 school year for admission into:

  1. The Reception Year at all primary and infant schools
  2. Year 3 in all junior schools
  3. Year 7 in all secondary schools
  4. Year 12 in secondary schools with post-16 provision

The admission arrangements for other schools which are not community or voluntary controlled schools are determined by their respective governing bodies or academy trusts. Copies of the determined admission arrangements for these Schools and Academies are available from the individual schools.

Determination of the admission arrangements at schools maintained by the Authority were made following consultation, as set out in The School Admissions Code and relevant legislation.  Copies of the determined admission arrangements are available for inspection at:

Children and Young Peoples Services, County Hall, Northallerton, North Yorkshire, DL7 8AD and also on the Council’s website admission, statistics and policies page.

Any person or body can object to the admission arrangements, where they provide their name and address, by writing to the school adjudicator, except where:

  1. the objection seeks, in substance, an alteration to admission arrangements for a grammar school;
  2. the objection seeks, in substance, to remove selection from a selective Academy;
  3. the objection relates to a non-increase in admission number for a school for which the local authority is not the admissions authority;
  4. the objection relates to a non-increase in admission number for a community or voluntary controlled school, except where the objection is by the governing body of that school
  5. the objection relates to an existing agreement for the admissions arrangements of an Academy to vary from the School Admissions Code
  6. the adjudicator has, within the last 2 years, made a decision to an objection to the admission arrangements of a school or Academy, and where any new objection referred to the adjudicator raises the same or substantially the same issues in relation to those admission arrangements.

All objections must be received by the adjudicator on or before 15 May 2021, at:

The Office of the Schools Adjudicator

Mowden Hall, Staindrop Road, Darlington, DL3 9BG

OSA.TEAM@osa.gsi.gov.uk

Tel: 0870 0012468 Fax: 01325 391313

Signed:   Stuart Carlton

Corporate Director, Children and Young Peoples Service

Dated: 17 February 2021

This consultation closed on 30th April 2021


Background

There are several transport issues in and around Malton and Norton which previous studies, such as the Malton & Norton Infrastructure and Connectivity Improvements Study, have examined. One of the key outputs of this study was the Internal Junction and Traffic Signal Study, which forms the focus of current work. The Internal Junction and Traffic Signal Study looked in more detail at different options to improve traffic, queuing and congestion, and modelled the impact on the transport network. Information on the process followed, and how a suitable potential scheme has been identified, are below. It is important to note that the scheme has not been finalised. Your feedback will help inform further work and development.

How have we developed options?

The Internal Junction and Traffic Signal Study looked in more detail at potential options and modelling the impact of these options on the transport network.

Two areas were identified where there was an opportunity to improve traffic, queueing and congestion; Butcher Corner and the area around the level crossing (Castlegate, Church Street, Welham Road, Norton Road).

These junctions were selected as they are key locations on the road network, where several routes all come together to connect into the centre of the two towns.

Butcher Corner already has traffic lights and pedestrian facilities, but improvements can be made to the operation of the traffic lights.

The level crossing area currently operates with priority given to Castlegate and Welham Road – Church Street and Norton Road have to give way. Improvements can be made to managing priority, and facilities for pedestrians and cyclists.

Improvements to the Welham Road / Church Street / Norton Road / Castlegate junction near the level crossing

  • A range of junction layouts and options were tested. The options considered included reversion of priority from the existing layout, a mini-roundabout and different traffic signal options. These options did not provide clear benefits over the current layout, and had some negative impacts e.g. road safety.
  • Traffic signals at the junction (based on the existing junction layout) were also looked at, but this did not provide sufficient benefits, and could cause more delays.
  • Further options which were looked at and discounted for the junction included; restricting/banning individual movements and one-way systems.

Improvements at Butcher Corner and One Way / Gyratory Systems to help the overall transport network

  • Traffic signal changes were looked at for Butcher Corner as there is limited space for more significant changes.
  • The option of removing approaches to the junction, and making them one way, was tested to make sure that journeys could still be accommodated with different routes. It was found that the proposed changes, including one-way gyratory systems across both towns, would make congestion worse.
  • Other options considered included a technology-based solution to make the junction more efficient, and a right turn green arrow (traffic signal) to improve traffic flow and increase ‘green light time’ for vehicles turning right from Castlegate to Old Maltongate.

All the options were scored against costs, how deliverable they were, and the benefits and disadvantages for different road users. We used the outputs from the Internal Junctions and Traffic Signal Study to develop the current scheme.

What is the proposed scheme?

Following analysis of modelling and design work to date, it was found that the proposed options as part of the Internal Junctions and Traffic Signal Study could not fully relieve the impact of congestion in Malton and Norton.

However, from in depth modelling, it was found that a combination of some options together would allow for better management of traffic, queueing and congestion, which would reduce delays. These proposed options are:

1) Technology changes to Butcher Corner Junction

  • New ‘right turn green arrow’ for traffic coming from Castlegate.
  • Upgrade of technology to better control traffic lights and manage traffic flow.

A map showing changes near the level crossing. Contact us for this information in a different format.

Download a bigger version of the  level crossing improvement plan (pdf / 311 KB).

2) Traffic signal control at Welham Rd / Church St / Norton Rd / Castlegate junction linking with rail level crossing

  • Traffic signal control added to the junction (this will be supplemented with changes to road layout at Church Street/Norton Road).
  • New pedestrian crossings across Welham Road and Norton Road.
  • Reconfiguring Church Street junction to single lane.

3) Infrastructure Changes at the Welham Rd / Church St / Norton Rd / Castlegate junction

  • Norton Road to be one-way westbound to reduce traffic movements onto the level crossing.
  • One-way system on Norton Road will free up road space to accommodate a new footpath/cycleway towards the train station.

Map showing technology changes to Butchers Corner junction. Contact us for this information in a different format.

Download a bigger version of the  Butchers Croner improvements plan. (pdf / 341 KB)

What are the scheme benefits?

  • Bring benefits to drivers, pedestrians and cyclists, in addition to better management of the overall transport network.
  • Better manage queues at the Welham Road / Church Street junction, and reduce the number of vehicles using routes, such as St. Nicholas Street, to ‘jump the queue’.
  • Benefits for pedestrians and cyclists with new signalised crossings at the level crossing junction, and new footway/cycleway on Norton Road. This will provide a safe route between Norton and Malton train station.
  • Advance stop lines for cyclists at the level crossing junction will allow cyclists to safely join the front of the queue.
  • More efficient management of traffic at Butcher Corner, benefitting all road users.
  • Better management of the road network in Malton and Norton, even with the planned increase in level crossing closures.

What are the scheme impacts?

  • There is an AQMA (Air Quality Management Area) at Castlegate meaning that the impact of the proposed scheme on air quality had to be tested.
  • Analysis showed that the proposed scheme is expected to have an impact on air quality within the AQMA at Castlegate.
  • The scheme will have an impact on bus routing, as buses will be diverted back towards Malton, before travelling along Wells Lane and south-bound along Castlegate.

Norton Road One-Way System

  • As a first step, we intend to trial the one-way system on Norton Road.
  • The one way system will be trialled for an initial three month period, before progressing with the rest of the proposed scheme.
  • This will be a temporary change to allow for detailed air quality measurements to be taken to assess the impact of the re-routed traffic on air quality.
  • The main aim of the trial is to better inform development, and further consideration, of the proposed scheme.

Have your say

Residents in Malton and Norton are invited to give their comments by completing our quick and easy online survey.

Have your say

Remember to take part before the survey closes on Friday 30th April 2021.

To request a paper copy of the survey, or if you require any further information, please email with your contact information and details of your enquiry to ltp@northyorks.gov.uk.

Your data security is important

For more information on how and why we process your personal data, please see the Malton and Norton improvement scheme privacy notice.

This consultation closed on 27 May 2021.


Danby Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School Governing Body To change category from a voluntary controlled school to a voluntary aided school.

Notice is given in accordance with section 19(3) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that Danby Church of England Voluntary Controlled School  Governing Body intends to make a prescribed alteration to Danby Church of England Voluntary Controlled School, Ainthorpe Lane, Danby, Whitby, North Yorkshire YO21 2NG from 16 September 2021.

To change category from a voluntary controlled school to a voluntary aided school.

No new or additional site is required for these proposals.

The governing body will implement the proposal

This Notice is an extract of the complete proposal. Copies of the complete proposal can be obtained from: Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE and the complete proposals are available on our website and on the Danby Primary School website.

Within four weeks from the date of publication of this proposal, any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by sending them to Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton,

DL7 8AE or by email to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk  by 5pm on 27 May 2021.

Signed: Chair of Governors, Danby CE VC Primary School

Publication Date: 29 April 2021

Have your say on advocacy services in North Yorkshire.

We would like to talk to people who are interested in advocacy services in North Yorkshire. This particularly includes people who have used these services and any health and social care staff who have experience of working with advocacy services.

We would like to understand people’s experiences with advocacy services, what they think about current services in North Yorkshire, and what people would like future services to look like.

Background

The contract for the existing adults’ advocacy service will end on 31 March 2022. The Service Development Team in Health and Adult Services is leading on the review of the current service and the development of a new service. This will start on 1st April 2022.

While a lot of what the service does is determined by national legislation, we want to involve people who have been supported by or worked with advocacy services in designing the new service as much as possible.

We are therefore inviting anyone with an interest in advocacy services to speak to us about their views and experiences. The engagement will run until Monday 16 August.

What is advocacy?

Advocacy is when someone supports you to speak up, or speaks up on your behalf, to ensure you are involved in decisions made about you. Some people have a legal right to an advocate.

Find further information about advocacy and the support available in North Yorkshire. You can also call us on 01609 780780.

Further information on the different types of advocacy and what the current service does is available below.

What is changing?

The current contract for an independent advocacy service for adults in North Yorkshire is ending on 31 March 2022. This is a statutory service, meaning that the council has to make sure a new service is in place from 1 April 2022.

There are no plans to fundamentally change what the service does. We are reviewing the service and talking to people to make sure that the new service reflects what is important to people when they are being supported by an advocate, and that they can access the support they need in the way which best suits them.

We are also waiting for more information about Liberty Protection Safeguards and the Mental Health Act review. The Liberty Protection Safeguards will replace the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards, and are due to come into force from April 2022.

We will make sure the new service includes any changes brought in by the Liberty Protection Safeguards and the government’s review into the Mental Health Act.

How people can get involved

There are several different ways people can tell us what they think. These include:

  • Completing a short online survey about advocacy. Please contact the team using the details below to request any alternative formats.
  • Arranging a phone or video call with a member of the Service Development team.
  • If you work in Health and Social Care, arranging for someone from Service Development to attend an upcoming meeting to discuss the engagement and advocacy services

If you would like to speak to someone about any of the above options, please email us at HASservicedevelopment@northyorks.gov.uk or call us on 01609 780780. You can also submit feedback via the Service Development email address.

What does the current service do?

The current adults’ advocacy service is provided by Cloverleaf Advocacy. They provide several different types of advocacy which are explained in the table below.

Type of advocacy

What it means

Care Act Advocacy

The Council needs to involve people in decisions about their care and support needs. This means that if someone has substantial difficulty being involved in a social care process such as an assessment, review of their care and support or a safeguarding process, the Council must provide an advocate if they do not have someone else who can help them.

Non-Statutory Advocacy

People are eligible for non-statutory advocacy in North Yorkshire if they have substantial difficulty being involved in a social care process which is not related to those covered by the Care Act processes.

For example, this could be about access to services, housing or a complaint.

Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy

The Council and NHS organisations must refer someone for an Independent Mental Capacity Advocate if they do not have capacity to make specific decisions and there is no-one who can be consulted about those decisions on their behalf.

This could be about serious medical treatment, a review of their care or where they live.

Independent Mental Health Advocacy

Independent Mental Health Advocates are specially trained to support people with decisions about mental health care and treatment. Hospital and medical staff must make sure that people know about their right to an advocate and make a referral if someone wants or needs an Independent Mental Health Advocate.

Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) Relevant Persons Representative (RPR)

If someone’s care is authorised following a Deprivation of Liberty assessment, a representative must be appointed to make sure that the rights of the person being deprived of their liberty are protected.

This can be a friend or family member and is known as a Relevant Person’s Representative (RPR). Anyone who is deprived of their liberty must have an RPR, so if the person’s friends and family cannot do this then an RPR from Cloverleaf is appointed.

In addition to the adults’ advocacy service delivered by Cloverleaf, there are other advocacy services covering North Yorkshire which also come to an end in March next year.

These include the children and young people’s advocacy service delivered by National Youth Advocacy Service and the NHS complaints service delivered by Cloverleaf Advocacy.

This engagement is only looking at the adults’ independent advocacy service. If you would like to submit feedback about the children’s, please email rachel.miller@northyorks.gov.uk ,or to submit feedback about NHS complaints services, please email daniel.harry@northyorks.gov.uk

What happens next?

We are talking to people about advocacy from June until the end of July. We will then make sure we have read through and recorded everything people have told us.

We will be writing a new service specification in August, and we will use what people have said to make sure the new service reflects what is important to people, how they want to be supported and how they want to access that support.

A summary of the feedback we receive will be published on this webpage. If you would like to be notified when this is available or request a copy in a different format, please contact the Service Development team.

Where can I find more information?

Find further information about advocacy and the support available in North Yorkshire. You can also call us on 01609 780780.

This survey closed on 23 July 2021.


Ourselves, Parent Carer Voice, and local Clinical Commissioning groups are seeking to develop a joint strategy for North Yorkshire that covers education, health and care, for children and young people with Special Educational needs and Disabilities SEND up to the age of 25 years.

In partnership with children, young people, parents, carers and other key stakeholders, we intend to establish a strategic vision for the future in North Yorkshire.

The strategy will reflect the views and experiences of children and young people, and their families, and sets out the course for ongoing and sustained progress.

It will shape how we work together in future to ensure the best outcomes for children and young people with SEND are achieved across the county. The strategy will be developed in collaboration with all of the following key stakeholders:

  • Children and young people with SEND
  • Parents/carers of children and young people with SEND
  • Health commissioners and providers
  • North Yorkshire, Vale of York, Bradford and Craven and Morecombe CCGs
  • Mainstream and specialist education settings
  • Voluntary and community sector organisations
  • Children’s Services and Health and Adult Services – North Yorkshire County Council

The first stage of developing the strategy is to ask for your input – we want to know what you think is going well in North Yorkshire, and what could be better.

Online events

We are holding some online events between 28 June and 15 July where you can share your experiences with us.

The events will be led by an independent body, the Council for Disabled Children (CDC).

Unfortunately, due to Covid-19 restrictions, it is unlikely that we will be able to host face-to-face events at the moment.

Parents and carers

Join parents and carers events.

Area

Date and time

Craven

1st July, 10-11.30am

Hambleton and Richmond

7th July, 10-11.30am

Harrogate

7th July, 7-8.30 pm

Scarborough

12th July, 1-2.30pm

Selby

15th July, 1-2.30pm

All areas

1st July, 7-8.30pm

8th July, 7-8.30pm

 

Professionals

Join professionals events

Area

Date and time

Craven

28th June, 7-8.30pm

Hambleton and Richmond

30th June, 1-2.30pm

Selby

1st July, 1-2.30 pm

All areas

6th July, 7-8.30pm

Harrogate

8th July, 1-2.30pm

All areas

12th July, 7-8.30pm

Scarborough

13th July, 1-2:30pm

Young people

A guided focus group for young people with SEND will be held on Thursday 15 July 2021, 5pm to 6pm on Microsoft Teams, hosted by NY Voice, our Youth Voice and Creative Engagement Team.

Young people can book their places here. Parents and trusted adults can attend and support their children during the group sessions as required.

If you can’t make the event on 15 July, we are more than willing to arrange a further session to accommodate all those who wish to take part.

If you or your young people have any concerns, questions, or would like to discuss any additional support needs to access the groups, please contact Nyvoice@northyorks.gov.uk.

Tell us your views

Online survey

Fill in our online survey

An easy read version of this survey is available on request – please contact us via one of the methods listed below.

Please sign up for an event and fill in the questionnaire. The questionnaire will be open until 23 July.

Other ways to give us your feedback

If you can’t come to an event, you can give us your feedback in other ways:

Send an email to SEND@northyorks.gov.uk

Call 01609 780780 to speak to our customer services centre

Write to us at:

SEND review
Central Admin Team
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
North Yorkshire
DL7 8AE

You can also ask for a print out of the survey or a different format by emailing SEND@northyorks.gov.uk or calling 01609 780780.

What happens next?

Your feedback will be incorporated into a draft strategy that will be developed collaboratively with representatives from each of the stakeholder groups.

There will be another chance to give your views in Autumn 2021, when there will be a formal consultation on the draft strategy.  We’ll then incorporate feedback from the consultation before producing a final strategy.

This is your opportunity to have your say on your experience of SEND services in North Yorkshire, and be part of shaping the strategy for the local area going forward.

We recently refreshed our equality and diversity policy statement and undertook an online consultation on the draft refreshed document from 7 April to 21 May 2021. We also engaged with staff via staff networks and internal communication platforms, and asked local disability groups for their comments.

In total 95 respondents completed the questionnaire on-line and 1 completed a paper version. A further 6 responses were received via email. Responses were received from:

  • North Yorkshire County Council Employees (88%)
  • Residents of North Yorkshire (6%)
  • Disability representatives (6%)

The survey results were strongly supportive of the proposed policy statement and people were in agreement that the aims (79% agreed) and commitments (81% agreed) were the right ones for North Yorkshire.

Respondents were asked if there was anything else they would like to tell us about our draft equality and diversity policy statement. Responses are grouped into themes below:

Response theme

No received

Need to ensure statement is embedded with staff/managers/councillors and training takes place

9

Clarification of terminology/wording and typos

6

Support for statement

4

Requirement for regular monitoring

4

Need to be clear about equality of opportunity and getting the best person for the job, not positive discrimination

4

Need additional emphasis on race

3

Specific comments about instances when the respondent feels NYCC has not met the standards it should

3

Poor attitude to disabled employees

2

Support for protecting rights of natal women

2

No mention of gender

1

Support networks for LGBT groups

1

Not enough women working part time in senior positions with younger children

1

How does this link to unitarisation?

1

Can we link in lived experience?

1

More resources needed to ensure commitments met

1

Support for ex-military job applicants

1

Equality practices/procedures – school governors

1

Read a full report on the consultation responses and amendments made to the policy statement as a result.

Our refreshed equality, diversity and inclusion policy statement was agreed at Full Council on 21 July 2021.


This consultation closed on 21 May


We are currently reviewing our equality and diversity policy statement and would like to hear your views on our draft outlined below.

Draft equality and diversity policy statement

Our Commitment

We welcome and celebrate diversity and the strengths this brings to our communities and workforce. We have detailed our vision and ambitions for the county and all our communities in our Council Plan.

As one of the largest employers in the county and one of the main providers of local services, We are committed to providing equality of opportunity and tackling discrimination, harassment, intimidation and disadvantage. We are also committed to achieving the highest standards in service delivery, decision-making and employment practice.

Our aims

We aim to:

  • create an inclusive culture with a sense of belonging for everyone
  • support the development of cohesive places where everyone is treated fairly no matter what their background
  • work with partners and local businesses to improve opportunities for the people of North Yorkshire, especially those who experience disadvantage and discrimination
  • be an access friendly organisation for communities and workforce
  • ensure that our recruitment is fair, open and inclusive
  • have a workforce that reflects the diversity of North Yorkshire
  • ensure that diversity and inclusion is a natural and organic part of what we do, making it something that everyone at the council understands
  • increase representation of under-represented groups at all levels across the council
  • build our reputation as an inclusive employer that attracts, develops, supports, retains and fully engages all of our workforce.

Treating everyone the same does not necessarily give people equality of opportunity. Sometimes we need to treat different people in a different way to give them equal access to a service or job.

Our responsibilities

The Equality Act 2010 says that we must not treat people unfairly because of age, disability, sex, gender reassignment, sexual orientation, race, religion or belief, pregnancy or maternity, marriage or civil partnership. These are called “protected characteristics”.

As a local authority we must:

  • stop unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation
  • make sure that people have equality of opportunity whether or not they have a particular protected characteristic
  • build good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who don’t

North Yorkshire is a very rural county and people living outside the larger towns can find it difficult to access services. We will treat people fairly wherever they live and make sure they get the services they need.

There are other factors which affect people’s lives. Examples of these are income, education, unpaid care responsibilities and occupation. We will work to deliver the best possible outcomes for all our communities and citizens.

We will not just focus solely on protected characteristics, but promote inclusion and diversity more generally.

Meeting our responsibilities

Everyone, including the the council, has a part to play to realise our vision for North Yorkshire. We will work with our communities and partners to achieve our vision.

As part of meeting our responsibilities, we make the following commitments:

  • we will treat staff and customers with dignity and respect, and embrace and celebrate diversity
  • we will develop our councillors and staff to help us meet our equality duties and show leadership by being active and visible in delivery of our responsibilities
  • we will use information and talk to people to identify where inequality exists so that we can plan to tackle it
  • when it will help us to improve our services and to understand how we are meeting our equality duties, we will ask questions about people’s protected characteristics, including age, race, sex and disability. We will always make it clear that people do not have to answer these questions and that they will still receive the services they need. We will keep personal data confidential
  • we will consider equality issues when we deliver our services. Our service plans will include any major equality actions that we plan to undertake. We will set at least one equality objective which will help us focus on some of the areas which we want to improve
  • when we think about changing our services we will make sure that those making the decision know how the change could affect people with any of the protected characteristics. We will collect information about how people might be affected before making a decision. If the change might cause difficulties for people with a protected characteristic, we will do our best to find ways to reduce this impact. If we can’t, then we should think carefully about whether we need to make the change to achieve a legitimate aim
  • we have a duty to make reasonable changes to the way we do things so that disabled people can use our services and work for us. We recognise that everyone is different and we will treat people as individuals
  • we will make sure that anyone who provides a service for us treats people fairly. We will do this through our procurement process and by monitoring their work
  • we will consider the needs of all communities in the methods we use for communicating with customers, colleagues and residents
  • we will recruit, select, train and promote staff fairly. We will aim to get the make-up of our staff to match our communities. We will have clear systems for staff to complain if they are treated unfairly
  • we will make it easy for customers to complain if something goes wrong and we will respond quickly and efficiently. If legal action is intended or underway; complaints will be suspended until the legal process is resolved
  • if we find that anyone has broken our equality policy we will investigate and take disciplinary action if appropriate
  • we will monitor our equality actions through our usual reporting systems
  • we will publish information each year to show how we are meeting our equality duties

Have your say

Please give your comments on our draft equality and diversity statement by completing our quick and easy online survey.

The survey closes on Friday 21 May

To request a paper copy of the survey or other formats, or if you require any further information, please email equality@northyorks.gov.uk with your contact information and details of your enquiry or ring us on 01609 780780.

 

This consultation closed on 30 April 2021.


We are working with Selby District Council, with funding from the York & North Yorkshire Local Enterprise Partnership (YNY LEP) on a Places and Movement Study. We want you to have your say on proposals.

The study will propose improvements to key streets and spaces in Selby District’s town centres which will benefit residents, businesses, and visitors alike. The study will help us to fully understand current and future issues and propose solutions that result in these centres being accessible to all and places that people want to live and work in and enjoy. Funding will need to be secured for these improvements, and the study is the first stage in doing this, to identify what changes people would like to see happen.

The project is separate to proposals for improvements taking place at Selby Station and the surrounding area. The Selby Station proposals are part of the Leeds City Region Transforming Cities Fund (TCF) programme. The improvements proposed in the Places and Movement Study are designed to be delivered in addition to changes around the station.

The project covers areas within Selby Conservation Area and Selby Heritage Action Zone (HAZ) Project, and the improvements proposed in the Places and Movement study are designed with consideration of heritage assets and aims to enhance these.

Our project journey

Initially, we are asking for your thoughts on proposals for Selby town centre and Sherburn-in-Elmet. Proposals for Tadcaster will be brought forward towards the end of 2021, once there is an agreed way forward on the town centre changes proposed in the Selby District Local Plan and following further technical assessment of those proposals.

The proposals for all the towns will form indicative packages for delivery in the short to medium term, subject to funding.

Your feedback will shape designs for the proposals in both areas and a preferred option for the three different movement options in Selby town centre will be selected.

In the next stage of the project, subject to funding being secured, further modelling work and assessment will take place for the preferred movement option. Further consultation will take place on designs as they develop. Final designs will need to go through the planning process before construction.

Improving our places

The vision of the study is: ‘The town centres of Selby District will transform by 2030 to provide exemplary, attractive, and accessible places for all to live, work and explore.’

The vision has informed the following objectives:

  • To support the perception of place and strengthen the local identity of the towns
  • To promote sustainable travel and accessibility to/ through the town centres
  • Futureproofing the towns to support wider objectives

Each town has specific challenges and opportunities and therefore will have different solutions. The existing issues this study aims to improve are the following:

  • Traffic congestion
  • Carbon emissions
  • Limited walking and cycling connections
  • Integration between transport modes
  • Safety and accessibility in town centres
  • Heavy Goods Vehicle (HGV) movements through town centres
  • Air quality and impact on public health
  • A need to create attractive spaces that encourage activity

In Sherburn-in-Elmet the study aims to address the following additional issues

  • Vehicle dominated environment
  • Limited crossing points for pedestrians and cyclists
  • Informal parking of vehicles
  • Narrow pavements
  • Limited greenery

The proposals

We are asking for your feedback on proposals in two areas: Selby town centre and Sherburn-in-Elmet. The proposals form indicative packages for a range of measures to improve the areas. Selby has three options to consider relating to the movement of vehicles.

View the plans and visualisations below to help you understand what is proposed. We have also provided answers to some frequently asked questions (FAQ’s) and a glossary of terms.

Selby Town Centre Movement Options

There are 3 options for the movement of vehicles in Selby town centre. A preferred highways option will be selected following this consultation, and further highway modelling work and assessment will take place for the preferred option.

Selby Highway Option A

Selby highways option a

Selby Highway Option B

Selby Highway Option B

Selby Highway Option C

Selby Highway Option C

Selby Town Centre Area Proposals

Under the different movement options (A, B and C) in Selby Town Centre, a number of improvements are enabled in these areas, and are outlined below each image. Each image is labelled with the highways option(s) that enable these improvements. A Location Plan is provided to show the location of the different areas in Selby that the images relate to.

Selby location plan

Selby Market Place/The Crescent

Option A/B

  • Public realm enhancement
  • Removal of street clutter
  • Continuation of quality surface materials on footways throughout the space
  • Permanent closure of Finkle Street to vehicles
  • Opportunity to introduce planting and more seating
  • Option B could feature courtesy crossings due to reduced traffic volumes

Market place option A/B

The Crescent Option A/B

Option C

  • One-way road offers additional space for planting and seating
  • Continuation of quality surface materials on footways and crossing points
  • Permanent closure of Finkle Street to vehicles
  • Appropriate softening of boundary treatment around the Abbey to reconnect it with the public realm and Selby Park

Market Place Option C

The Crescent Option C

Selby Micklegate

Option A/B

  • Public realm enhancement to provide central civic space
  • Tree planting
  • Enhancement of public realm around Abbot’s Staith building
  • Removal of most parking spaces to maximise adaptable space for events

Micklegate Option A/B

Option C

  • Public realm enhancement to provide central civic space
  • Tree planting
  • Enhancement of public realm around Abbot’s Staith building
  • Retention of some parking as required

Micklegate Option C

Micklegate Sketch

Selby Back Micklegate

  • Proposals for Back Micklegate could be brought forward without changes to the movement of vehicles in Selby.
  • Reconfiguration of parking spaces to enable tree planting to soften the appearance of the car park
  • Widened footways to enhance pedestrian safety and attractiveness
  • Improved entrance into car park to ensure its presence is clear to those arriving in Selby
  • Definition of the pedestrian route through to Micklegate including a pedestrian bridge over the dam.

Back Micklegate plan

Back Micklegate Sketch

Selby New Street

Option A/B

  • Removal of street clutter and guard railing to maximise footway space for pedestrians
  • Courtesy crossings to provide traffic calming and more opportunities to cross the road safely
  • Opportunity for higher quality surface materials in the footway and crossing points

New Street Option A/B

Option C

  • Narrowing of the road width to one lane enabling footways to be widened for pedestrians, and vehicle dominance on the street to be reduced
  • High quality surface materials to align with Market Place giving a sense of a continuous street, appropriate to the Selby Conservation Area.
  • Improved air quality enabled by reduced traffic volumes.

New Street Option C

Selby Riverside

Option A/B

  • Narrowing of the road to maximise footways and provide space for planting to create a green riverside corridor
  • Courtesy crossings allow places to cross and provide traffic calming measures
  • Management of riverside vegetation to enable views to the river

Selby Riverside option A/B

Option C

  • Narrowing of the road width to one lane to maximise footways and provide space for planting to create a green riverside corridor
  • Courtesy crossings with quality surface materials allow places to cross, provide traffic calming measures and maintain the identity of the town centre
  • Management of riverside vegetation to enable views to the river

Riverside Option C

Selby Flaxley Road/New Millgate

Option A/B

  • Reconfiguration of road layout to widen footways, introduce planting and street trees, and provide courtesy crossing points
  • On street parking provided where required
  • Opportunity to introduce cycling infrastructure with additional space created

Option C

  • Reconfiguration of road layout to widen footways, introduce planting and street trees, and provide courtesy crossing points
  • Junctions improved to provide traffic calming
  • Opportunity to introduce cycling infrastructure with additional space created

Flaxley Road option C

Flaxley Road option C sketch

New Millgate Option C

New Millgate Option C sketch

Selby Western Gateway (Scott Road Junction)

Option A/B

  • Gateway design features to announce arrival into the town
  • Reconfiguration of road layout and junction to maximise width of footways, introduce planting and street trees, and provide clear crossing points
  • Public realm enhanced around the Town Hall building as the focal point of the space and an important cultural hub
  • Quality surface materials on footways and crossings

Option C

  • Gateway design features to announce arrival into the town
  • Reconfiguration of road layout and junction to maximise width of footways, introduce planting and street trees, and provide clear crossing points
  • Public realm enhanced around the Town Hall building as the focal point of the space and an important cultural hub
  • Quality surface materials on footways and crossings
  • Opportunity to permanently close York Street to vehicles and provide continuous crossing point

Western Gateway Option C

Sherburn-in-Elmet Area Proposals

The following images indicate proposals for improvements to place in Sherburn-in-Elmet and these are outlined below each image. A Location Plan is provided to show the location of the different areas in Sherburn-in-Elmet that the images relate to.

Sherburn-in-Elmet location plan

Finkle Hill

  • Removal of off-street parking to provide a new public realm space as a focal point for the town.
  • Provision of on street parking bays.
  • Widening of footways, introduction of planting and street trees.
  • Street furniture to offer informal seating whilst deterring illegal parking.
  • Quality surface materials enhance the sense of place and contribute to the identity of the town.

Finkle Hill

Kirkgate/Finkle Hill junction

  • Reconfiguration of junction layout to widen footways and improve crossing points for pedestrians.
  • Quality surface materials on footways and crossing points provide continuity through the town and contribute to its identity.
  • Street furniture to offer informal seating whilst deterring illegal parking and improving perception of pedestrian safety.

Kirkgate/Finkle Hill

Low Street (North)

  • Removal of off-street parking to provide a new public realm space as a focal point for the town.
  • Provision of on street parking bays.
  • Widening of footways, introduction of planting and street trees.
  • Street furniture to offer informal seating whilst deterring illegal parking.
  • Quality surface materials on footways and raised crossing points helps prioritise pedestrians and promotes slower vehicle speeds.

Low Street north

Low Street (South)

  • Reconfiguration of parking to provide a positive pedestrian environment and sense of place.
  • Quality surface materials on footways and crossing points provide continuity through the town and contribute to its identity.
  • Raised area across the Church View and Wolsey Croft junction provides traffic calming and improves pedestrian safety for crossing.

Low Street south

Online events

The online events have now passed. You can:

You can also view the  presentation from the online events (pdf / 4 MB). If you use assistive technologies, such as screen readers, and need this document in another format please get in touch.

See FAQ's from the online events

What is the overall reduction in car parking spaces likely to be in Sherburn with your current proposals?

This is not yet determined, and would be part of any future scheme development work, should proposals be taken forward.

Has a feasibility study been done on the impacts on traffic of narrowing Kirkgate in Sherburn? What are the impacts on flow? Will long vehicles be able to swing to turn left from outside Red Bear left into Kirkgate?

This type of detailed work would be undertaken at a later stage, should any of the recommended proposals be selected as a preferred option following this consultation.

Will sustainable transport be built-in eg scooter hire, cycle spaces, electric car charging?

Yes, this is something, which will be considered in more detail should a preferred option be further developed.

Are there any plans for Tadcaster?

Ideas for Tadcaster will be developed towards the end of 2021, to allow for progression of proposals in the Selby District Local Plan.

Where has the money come from to pay for WSP consultancy?

The study has been jointly funded by North Yorkshire County Council, Selby District Council and the York and North Yorkshire Local Enterprise Partnership.

Why not propose an Oxford Street-style crossing at the cross-roads in Sherburn so pedestrians can cross from corner to corner and not wait for two sets of crossing lights to change?

We hope to bring forward enhancement ideas as a later stage of this work.

Are you going to improve Barlby Road?

These proposals are for the town and village centres. Selby District Council is talking separately to Forfarmers about Barlby Road - it is recognised that improvements can be made.

Gowthorpe for pedestrians only at least limited times or days. Beverley has done it and it’s busy. Can we be brave and do it too? Give us back our streets.

This consultation is to allow people to give their views on whether the benefits of the proposals are worth some potential inconvenience - we will take all views into consideration and would ask that you fill in the survey.

If my understanding of the suggestions for Selby is correct, Selby would be a huge loop so that shoppers parking in the Sainsburys area or at the leisure centre then have to continue one way.  Very impractical if you have come from and returning to Thorpe Willoughby and beyond that direction.

This consultation is to allow people to give their views on whether the benefits of the proposals are worth some potential inconvenience - we will take all views into consideration and would ask that you fill in the survey.

It's not clear on the NYCC website that the images are concepts of how things could change; feel more like the actual proposals.

We have covered the 'project journey' in the introductory text to explain the stage of the study to those responding.

What about Covid?

The proposals are intended to allow more space for people in the town centres and to socialise outdoors.

Can we install seating in social groupings with bins? (including recycling and dog waste)

Please tell us your views by filling in the survey and adding your comments.

I cycle into and around town nearly every day. Will you ask us about cycle lanes? Usually the design companies don't know the town or how we use our space.

This study considers the Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP) for Selby and Sherburn Active travel is an important objective in the study and proposals include the potential for cycle infrastructure on Scott Road, Flaxley Road, and New Millgate.

Please fill in the survey and add your comments.

Does funding allow for ongoing maintenance?

The cost estimates developed for the scheme will take into account initial maintenance costs. In the longer term, maintenance will be taken on by the relevant authority.

Any information on safe cycle routes into town?

A cycling and walking plan has been developed for Selby District Council which sets out a variety of routes on which infrastructure could be delivered.  These are now considered as part of any project, and where funding is available, will be put forward for consideration.

How will one way roads impact emergency services vehicle access in Selby town centre?

We will work with the emergency services, as a statutory consultee in regard to the preferred proposals both in terms of vehicular access and ensuring safety in design for those on foot in public spaces.

How will you encourage visitors without the ease of access and reduction of car parking?

The proposals seek to maintain a balance between different modes of transport and how they move around the town. Whilst accepting that appropriate access for vehicles should be maintained, the proposals aim to make walking and cycling into the town much easier, ideally removing short vehicles trips where this is possible.

The proposals also provide space to create a much more attractive town centre, encouraging people from the wider district to choose Selby over other larger destinations.  It is accepted that there will always be a need for suitably located parking provision and this will be considered as part of further development of a preferred option.

Have you considered the benefits of electric & zero emissions vehicles?

Yes, this has been considered as part of the study and any option taken forward will take into account facilities for new technologies and future mobility developments.

Next steps

Following the closure of the public consultation on Friday 30th April, all feedback on proposals will be considered. There will be more opportunities to provide feedback on detailed designs and plans once funding has been secured for the next stage of the project.

For any enquiries, please contact selbypandmstudy@northyorks.gov.uk


NYCC logo, Selby logo and LEP logo

Diocese of York

Ingleby Arncliffe Church of England Primary School

Proposed order under section 554 and 556 of The Education Act 1995

Notice is herby given:

  1. That the Secretary of State for Education proposes to make an order under sections 554 and 556 of the Education Act 1996 in respect of the above mentioned Church of England educational foundation. The purpose of sections 554 and 556 is to enable the assets of discontinued denominational voluntary schools to be applied for the benefit of new and continuing voluntary schools and foundation schools of the same denomination within the state system of education. The order will, where appropriate, authorise the sale of the premises described.
  2. That under sections 554 and 556 of the Education Act 1996 any person interested may within one month after the date of this Notice make representations on the proposed order in writing to the Secretary of State at the Department’s address given below.

A copy of the draft order may be inspected from Monday to Friday between 10 am and 4pm at Main Reception, County Hall, Northallerton DL7 8AD

Additional copies can be obtained from the Department for Education, Real Estate Team, Bishopsgate House, Darlington, DL1 5QE or email: land.transactions@education.gov.uk 

25th February 2021

Read  the Statutory Instruments Document. (pdf / 303 KB)

This consultation closed on 24 March 2021.


Find out about the Leeds City Region Transforming Cities Fund programme, a major new programme of investment that aims to create a step change in travel across the region. 

North Yorkshire County Council, Harrogate Borough Council, Craven District Council, Selby District Council and West Yorkshire Combined Authority have been successful in a bid to secure £31m for projects in Selby, Skipton and Harrogate town centres, through the Leeds City Region Transforming Cities Fund.

The project is part of the Leeds City Region Transforming Cities Fund programme, a major new programme of investment that aims to create a step change in travel across the region. This investment will also help ‘level up’ the UK economy and redistribute wealth, jobs and investment more equitably across the four nations. This investment forms part of a much wider plan to tackle the climate crisis and deliver a more sustainable future for the region.

In each town, a major package of investment will improve opportunities for sustainable travel and link transport hubs with centres of education and employment – all essential to getting back on track after the Covid-19 pandemic. This is a once in a generation chance to totally re-design parts of the town centres, with investment that will help to fire up the engine on the journey to recovery.

We want to know what you think about the proposals and will be hosting a series of online events where you can hear more and ask questions, before completing an online survey when the consultation opens on 24 February 2021.

What to do next

Have your say!

We want as many people, businesses and organisations as possible to fill in the online survey and help shape the projects for each town.

Fill in the online survey

The consultation is running from 24 February 2021 until to 24 March 2021.

Attend a live event

Scheme Date and Time Join

Harrogate

Wednesday 3 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Harrogate

Wednesday 10 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Skipton

Tuesday 2 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Skipton

Thursday 11 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Selby

Thursday 4 March at 6pm

Event has passed

Selby

Friday 12 March at 6pm

Event has passed

This consultation ended on 23 February 2021


This page sets out details of a proposal to lower the age range of Scarborough Pupil Referral Unit from 11-16 to 4-16, on 31 August 2021. It gives the background to the proposal. There will be a virtual public meeting on: 18 January at 7pm.

If you wish to be part of this virtual meeting could you please let us know by emailing schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk

If you do not have the facilities to participate in a virtual meeting but would still like to take part could you please liaise directly with Scarborough Pupil Referral Unit, Valley Bridge Parade, Scarborough YO11 2PG, 01609 536516

Background

Local authorities are responsible for arranging suitable full-time education for permanently excluded pupils, and for other pupils who – because of illness or other reasons – would not receive suitable education without such provision. This applies to all children of compulsory school age resident in the local authority area, whether or not they are on the roll of a school, and whatever type of school they attend. Full-time education for excluded pupils must begin no later than the sixth day of the exclusion.

Pupil Referral Units (PRUs) are a type of alternative provision which educates pupils who are unable to access mainstream schooling for any of the reasons set out above.

Although located in Scarborough town the PRU provides education to pupils from across the Scarborough District.

The Proposal

Scarborough Pupil Referral Unit has historically had an age range of 11-16 and itis predominantly pupils within this age range who have required this type of provision. However, there have also been a small number of pupils aged under 11 who have been excluded and have required an alternative provision. In these circumstances a number of provisions in primary schools have provided places. In 2019 it was considered by officers that the expertise of the PRU was best suited to provide these places to the younger pupils. For the last year the PRU has temporarily accommodated a number of pupils aged under 11 and it is now the view of officers that this should be formalised as a longer term arrangement until at least such time that the SEND Strategic Plan is fully implemented.

It is essential that the Local Authority maintain options to provide provision for primary aged pupils who are excluded from school. The number of places required is likely to be very low and  it is unlikely that the Scarborough PRS would support more than 5 primary age pupils at any one time.

The PRU is considered the most appropriate provision to lead on the education of this younger group of pupils. The staff and leadership at the PRU have the necessary professional skills and primary education training to meet the needs of these pupils. At the last Ofsted inspection in 2018 the provision was judged ‘Good’ and the effectiveness Leadership and Management was judged ‘Outstanding’. This proposal is being made with the support of the Leadership at the Scarborough PRU.

What Happens Next?

Your views about this proposal are welcomed.

This survey has closed.

Paper responses should be returned to the address below:

Freepost RTKE-RKAY-CUJS
Scarborough Pupil Referral Unit
Strategic Planning
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
DL7 8AE

The closing date for responses is 23 February 2021

All responses to the consultation received by this date will be considered by the County Council’s Executive Member for Education and Skills on Tuesday 9 March 2021.

Anticipated Key Dates

All dates are subject to approvals at each stage.

Stage

Date

Approval to Consult by Executive Members

15 December 2020

Consultation opens

(6 weeks during term time)

12 January 2021

Virtual Public meeting

18 January 2021

Consultation closes

23 February 2021

 Executive Members for Education and Skills considers consultation response

9 March 2021

Executive Members decision whether to implement

9 March 2021

Proposed Implementation date

31 August 2021

This consultation ended on 19 February 2021.


Notice is given in accordance with section 15(1) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, intends to discontinue St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School (Voluntary Aided), Waterstead Lane, Whitby, North Yorkshire, YO21 1PZ on 9 April 2021.

Copies of the complete proposal can be obtained from: Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE and are available below.

Within four weeks from the date of publication of this proposal, any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by sending them to Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, or by email to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk by 5pm on 19 February 2021.

Signed: B. Khan

Assistant Chief Executive

(Legal and Democratic Services)

Publication Date: 22 January 2021

Supporting documents

Statutory proposals for closure of St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School

Consultation document

List of Consultees

Record of public meeting

Response to consultation

Equality impact assessment

This consultation ended on 5 March 2021.


Notice is given in accordance with section 15(1) of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 that North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, intends to discontinue Kell Bank Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, Healey, Masham, North Yorkshire, HG4 4LH on 31 August 2021.

Copies of the complete proposal can be obtained from: Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE and are available below.

Within four weeks from the date of publication of this proposal, any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by sending them to Corporate Director - Children and Young People's Service, North Yorkshire County Council, County Hall, Northallerton, DL7 8AE, or by email to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk by 5pm on 5 March 2021.

Signed: B. Khan

Assistant Chief Executive

(Legal and Democratic Services)

Publication Date: 5 February 2021

Supporting documents

 Statutory proposals for school closures Kell Bank (pdf / 363 KB)

 Kell Bank published consultation document (pdf / 500 KB)

 List of consultees (pdf / 285 KB)

 Record of public meeting 17 November 2020 (pdf / 545 KB)

 Record of public meeting 2 December 2020 (pdf / 353 KB)

 Responses to the consultation document (pdf / 309 KB)

 Equality Impact Assessment Kell Bank C of E Primary School (pdf / 636 KB)

If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need a version of these document in a more accessible format, please get in touch.

This consultation ended on 7 March 2021.


A consultation on Section 75 Partnership Agreement for 0-19 Healthy Child Service in North Yorkshire.

North Yorkshire County Council and Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust would like to enter into a formal partnership arrangement to allow the Trust to deliver the 0-19 Healthy Child Service (Health Visiting and School Age Service) on the Council’s behalf.  This would involve the Trust and the Council entering into a Partnership Agreement under Section 75 of the National Health Service Act 2006.

To do this, the Council and the Trust, as potential partners, have to consult with any stakeholders who they think may be affected by the arrangements. 

Please refer to documents below for further information:

1. Section 75 Healthy Child Service FAQs

2. Section 75 Healthy Child Service consultation document

 3. Draft Section 75 agreement (pdf / 3 MB) If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please get in touch.

If you would like to make any comments or share your views regarding these arrangements please fill in the survey or email: healthychild@northyorks.gov.uk.

The consultation runs from 5 February 2021 to 7 March 2021.

This consultation was ended on 8 February 2021


Proposal to lower the age range of Stillington Primary School to provide a nursery class

The Executive approved the publication of a statutory notice on 24 November 2020 regarding proposals to lower the age range of pupils from 4 to 11 to 3 to 11 at Stillington Primary School with effect from 23 February 2021.

This will give a further four weeks for representation to be made. Any person may object to or make comments on the proposal by 5pm on 8 February 2021.

Have your say

Comments on the statutory notice can be sent to:
Strategic Planning - Children and Young People's Service
North Yorkshire County Council<
County Hall
Northallerton
DL7 8AD

This consultation will run from the 11 January to the 5pm on 8 February.

Supporting documents

Stillington Primary School Statutory Notice

Stillington Statutory Proposal

Background Information

Report to Executive – 24 November 2020

This consultation ended on 4 December 2020


A consultation on the proposed school admission arrangements for community and voluntary controlled schools in 2022/2023

In accordance with our statutory duty under The School Admissions (Admission Arrangements and co-ordination of Admission Arrangements) (England) Regulation 2012 we are is consulting on proposed school admission arrangements for community and voluntary controlled schools 2022/2023.

The consultation closes on 4 December 2020. If you wish to respond please email schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk.

Voluntary Aided, Foundation, Academy, UTC and Free Schools

The determination of admission arrangements for Voluntary Aided, Foundation, Academy, UTC and Free Schools is a matter for the schools’ governing bodies as the admission authority for the school.  Any comments relating to a Voluntary Aided, Foundation, Academy, UTC or Free Schools should be addressed directly to the school in question.

The following schools are currently consulting on their admission arrangements:

This consultation ended on 14 December 2020


Proposal to close St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School, Whitby from 9 April 2021.

There will be a virtual public meeting on Tuesday 24 November at 7 pm.

If you wish to be part of this virtual meeting could you please let us know by emailing schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk and joining instructions will be provided

If you do not have the facilities to participate in a virtual meeting but would still like to engage directly in the consultation process then please liaise with St Hilda’s RC Primary School, Waterstead Lane, Whitby, North Yorkshire YO21 1PZ (Tel. 01947 603901)

Background

St Hilda’s Roman Catholic School is a small school located in Whitby that has no distinct catchment area but has historically served a wide area consisting primarily of Whitby and the surrounding rural area.

Pupil numbers at the school have been low compared to other local schools for many years and governors and leaders of the school as well as the Diocese and NYCC as the Local Authority (LA) have been aware of the school’s vulnerability. As a small school operating in an area with a significant surplus of school places the school is particularly susceptible to the effects of falling numbers due to parental preference.

Governors have worked hard to try and increase pupil numbers at the school notably by working alongside the Diocese to bring an Early Years education provider onto the school site and foster relations with these families. The governors, with support from the LA, have also attempted to make cost savings and reduce expenditure where possible.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Middlesbrough has been undergoing a process of converting all of their maintained schools into Academies under the leadership of multi-academy trusts. In December 2018 an academy order was signed for St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School. However, as with all academy conversions a process of due diligence was required before any conversion would be approved. In the case of St Hilda’s, the financial situation and projected financial outlook prevented the school from been accepted into a Trust.

Decision to consult upon closure in January 2020

In January 2020 the Governing Body asked the LA to enter into consultation to seek to close St Hilda’s RC Primary School due to the continued falling rolls and associated significant financial challenges faced by the school, coupled with the continued lack of applications for admission to the school from Catholic pupils.

During the consultation period in Spring 2020 a group of stakeholders made the case that they would like more time and some further engagement with the LA to explore further any options for keeping the school open. However, due to the Covid 19 Pandemic which closed the School, and the restrictions placed upon gatherings, it was not feasible to hold these kind of discussions within an appropriate timescale given the proposed closure date of 31 August 2020. Having first extended the consultation period, a decision was then taken by the LA in early April to not proceed with the proposal at that time, therefore allowing the opportunity for stakeholders to look at alternatives to closure.

Decision to consult upon closure in September 2020

As part of the work to satisfy themselves that all options had been considered, three local stakeholders, comprising two parents and County Councillor Joe Plant, joined the Schools Governing Body. Alongside this the Roman Catholic Diocese appointed further Foundation Governors to ensure a full range of expertise were available to look at the options. The changes constituted a complete restructure of the Governing Body as only two members remained from the previous board and a new Chair and Vice-Chair were appointed. The LA funded a piece of detailed financial analysis on options for the school going forward and provided additional professional support.

Following a short period of review the LA received a letter from the Governing Body of St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School in early September 2020 in which they stated, ‘With enormous sadness and deep regret, and after many months of sustained efforts to identify a solution to the funding crisis faced by the school, the governors of St Hilda’s RC Primary School feel they must once again ask North Yorkshire County Council to commence formal consultation on the proposed closure of our St Hilda’s.’

The Governing Body of St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School have not reached this decision lightly. They have decided that pupil numbers had fallen to an unsustainable level and found they were not able to set a balanced budget which is a legal requirement. The Diocese of Middlesbrough has confirmed that there is no evidence to require the continuation of Catholic provision in Whitby and the LA have confirmed that the school is not required to meet their duty to maintain sufficient school places. 

The LA is therefore now consulting on the proposal to close the school with effect from 9 April 2021.

Factors affecting the School’s viability

There are three main factors leading to this closure proposal. First, the number of children at St Hilda’s has fallen from 51 in 2015/16 to 19 in September 2020/21. The total pupil number has now fallen to 2 since the closure proposal was announced earlier this term.

Secondly, with pupil numbers largely determining the school budget the finances are not sustainable. The financial outlook has significantly worsened in line with the dramatic fall in pupils numbers and there is therefore no prospect of financial recovery.

Finally, the Diocese of Middlesbrough’s mission and purpose is to provide education with a Catholic character to Catholic children. Out of a total role of 24 children on roll at St Hilda’s in 2019/20 only 4 were Catholic. The Diocese confirmed at that time that there was no evidence to support the continuation of Catholic education in Whitby, as there appeared to be no other Catholic children seeking to attend the school. This position has not changed given the current number on roll.

Pupil Numbers

The number of children at St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School has been falling over the past few years. There were just 19 pupils on roll at the beginning of September 2020 and this total has fallen to 2 since the closure proposal was announced. The majority of the pupils who have recently left have taken advantage of the Diocese of Middlesbrough’s offer to ensure that places at, and transport to, St Hedda’s R.C Primary School, Egton Bridge would be made available for any pupils from St Hilda’s. Forecasts indicate there is no reasonable prospect of the numbers of pupils at St Hilda’s returning to sustainable levels.

 

Total pupils on roll at St Hilda’s

2015/16

51

2016/17

46

2017/18

31

2018/19

28

2019/20

24

1 September 2020

19

1 October  2020

2

The pupil roll over recent years has been well below the capacity of the school, which is designed to accommodate 105 pupils if all spaces are in use.

There is a significant surplus of school places across Whitby Town. Where possible school place planners seek to maintain a 5% to 10% surplus of places in a planning area to allow for flexibility within the system and parental preference to be exercises. In Whitby there is currently a surplus of over 30%. Even if all housing identified within the local plan was constructed at expected rates the surplus is projected to stand at 28% in 24/25.

If St Hilda’s were to close the surplus across the town would drop to 23% at present, and if all local plan housing was constructed at expected rates that surplus is projected to stand at 21% in 24/25.

The Financial Position

Pupil numbers determine the school budget.  With reducing pupil numbers, and a reduced budget, the finances are not sustainable.

Projected Budget Positions as at September 2021

In Year Deficit 2020/21

  • £39.6k

In Year Deficit 2021/22

  • £53.4k

In Year Deficit 2022/23

  • £30.7k

Cumulative Deficit end of 22/23

  • £144.7k

These projections were based on pupil number assumptions of 20 in Autumn 2020 and 26 in Autumn 2021. The financial outlook has significantly worsened in line with the dramatic fall in pupil numbers and there is therefore no prospect of financial recovery.

Schools Standards/Ofsted

The School’s last Ofsted inspection was in November 2017 and it confirmed that the school continued to be ‘Good’. This proposal is not based upon the quality of the education provision at St Hilda’s. However, it should be noted that where numbers of pupils at a school fall very low and budgets become restricted it provides an additional challenge to school standards.

Other local schools

The nearest local school, 0.1 miles from St Hilda’s Roman Catholic School, is Airy Hill Primary School, Whitby. There are also four other local Primary Schools; East Whitby Primary Academy, Ruswarp CE VC Primary School, Stakesby Primary Academy and West Cliff Primary School.

The nearest Roman Catholic School at 7.3 miles away is St Hedda’s Roman Catholic Primary School, Egton Bridge.

For children currently at St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School, North Yorkshire County Council will work with each family to try to meet their individual preferences for other schools. Governors at St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School are also committed to supporting families in their choice of school and in making a smooth transition. The Diocese of Middlesbrough will seek to ensure that spaces are available at the nearest Catholic Primary School (St Hedda’s  Primary School, Egton Bridge) and to provide transport for those pupils currently at St Hilda’s who wish to continue to receive a Catholic education. Some schools may be able to admit over their published admission numbers for some year groups.

Eligibility for home-to-school transport will be determined in line with the County Council’s current home-to- school transport policy and procedures, based on travel distances from each child’s home address and individual circumstances. 

Parents have a right to express a preference for any school. The LA is the admissions authority for community and voluntary controlled schools and will meet that preference provided there are vacant places or the school is happy to admit above the published admission number.  The governing body decides the conditions for admission to Voluntary Aided schools or Academy schools, whilst still bound by the Admissions Code. Where a child attends a school, which is not their normal school or nearest school, parents are normally responsible for making transport arrangements.  

North Yorkshire County Council’s Admissions Team is always happy to give advice to parents – please contact Vickie Hemming-Allen on 01609 535481 or Lisa Herdman on 01609 534953.

Details of other local schools

Based on January 2020 Census.

 

St Hilda’s RC Primary School

Airy Hill Primary School

East Whitby Primary Academy

Ruswarp CE VC  Primary School

Stakesby Primary Academy

West Cliff Primary School

Total

 

 

Academy

Academy

 

Academy

Academy

 

Distance from St Hilda’s RC School by road

NA

0.1 miles

1.1 miles

1.6 miles

0.9 miles

0.9 miles

 

Last Ofsted inspection

Good – June 2013

Not applicable

Not applicable

Good – March 2018

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

Net Capacity

(places available at the school)

105

210

315

105

233

210

1178

Current pupil roll

24

179

188

94

144

188

817

Current capacity

-/+

81

31

127

11

89

22

361

Pupil roll 2020/21

15

176

183

90

137

197

798

Pupil roll 2021/22

15

173

181

85

138

198

790

Pupil roll 2022/23

14

175

178

87

137

196

787

Pupil roll 2023/24

14

173

172

86

135

198

778

Pupil roll 2024/25

13

170

168

83

133

198

765

Pupils from outstanding permissions by 2024/25*

0

16

17

14

18

3

 

Potential pupils from future housing – Local Plan (over 15 yrs)*

0

0

85

0

15

8

 

*Based on 1 primary-aged pupil from every 4 houses

Staff

A separate consultation process, including a staff meeting, will run in parallel with the closure process.

The School Site

The school building and part of the site is owned by the Diocese of Middlesbrough with the remainder owned by the County Council. Decisions about the future use of the school building and playing field will be taken by the owners after the closure proposal has been determined.

What Happens Next?

Your views about this proposal are welcomed.

Complete our online survey

Paper responses should be returned to North Yorkshire County Council at the address below:

Freeport RTKE-RKAY-CUJS
St Hilda’s
Strategic Planning
North Yorkshire County Council
County Hall
Northallerton
DL7 8AE

The closing date for responses is 14 December 2020

All responses to the consultation received by this date will be considered by the County Council’s Executive on 12 January 2021.

If the County Council’s Executive decides to proceed with the closure proposal, then statutory notices would be published in the local press on Friday 22 January 2021. These notices provide a further four weeks for representations to be made.  A final decision would then be taken by North Yorkshire County Council’s Executive on 9 March 2021.  If agreed the school would close on 9 April 2021.

Key Dates

All dates are subject to approvals at each stage.

Consultation opens

2 November 2020

Virtual Public meeting

24 November 2020 at 7pm

Consultation closes

14 December 2020

County Council’s Executive considers consultation response

12 January 2021

Statutory Notices published (4 weeks for representations to be made)

22 January 2021 to 19 February 2021

Final decision by County Council’s Executive

9 March 2021

Proposed school closure date

9 April 2021

This consultation ended on Friday 22 January 2021.


North Yorkshire County Council has identified the need to establish a new mixed mainstream primary school for children aged 4 to 11 in Northallerton to open in September 2022. We are therefore seeking proposals to establish an academy under section 6A of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 (the ‘free school presumption’). 

Summary of key school information

School’s Characteristic

Description

School type

Mainstream primary

Age range

4-11  Reception to Year 6

Published admission number

30

Size / Capacity

210 places

Gender

Mixed

Opening date

September 2022

Opening profile

First year of operation:  Reception only

Second year:  Reception and Year 1

Adding a further year group for the third year of operation and beyond until full opening is achieved

Admission arrangements       

Oversubscription criteria to be determined by the chosen Academy Trust.

North Yorkshire County Council propose that the new Northallerton School will not have a defined catchment area. Instead priority for admission to the School would be determined by proximity to it.

North Yorkshire County Council propose that the new Northallerton School will not have a defined catchment area. Instead priority for admission to the School would be determined by proximity to it.

Proposers should follow the guidance in the  specification document (pdf / 1 MB) and completed application forms should be returned to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk  by Friday 22 January 2021.

This consultation ended on 22 January 2021


Would your Academy Trust be interested in operating a new primary school for North Yorkshire?

North Yorkshire County Council has identified the need to establish a new mixed mainstream primary school with nursery for children aged 3 to 11 in Knaresborough to open in September 2022. We are therefore seeking proposals to establish an academy under section 6A of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 (the ‘free school presumption’). 

Summary of key school information

School’s Characteristic

Description

School type

Mainstream primary

Age range

3-11  Nursery to Year 6

Published admission number

30

Size / Capacity

210 places

Gender

Mixed

Opening date

September 2022

Opening profile

First year of operation: Nursery and Reception only

Second year: Nursery, Reception and Year 1

Adding a further year group for the third year of operation and beyond until full opening is achieved

Admission arrangements

Oversubscription criteria to be determined by the chosen Academy Trust.

North Yorkshire County Council propose a defined school catchment for the area covered by the Manse Farm and Highfield Farm developments. 

Proposers should follow the guidance in the  specification document (pdf / 692 KB) and completed application forms should be returned to schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk by Friday 22 January 2021.

This consultation ended on Wednesday 2 December 2020.


Proposal to close Kell Bank Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School  from 31 August 2021.

There will be virtual public meetings on Tuesday 17 November and Wednesday 2 December 2020 at 7pm

If you wish to be part of this virtual meeting could you please let us know by emailing schoolorganisation@northyorks.gov.uk  and joining instructions will be provided

If you do not have the facilities to participate in a virtual meeting but would still like to engage directly in the consultation process then please could you liaise directly with Kell Bank CE VC Primary School, Healey, Masham, Ripon, North Yorkshire, HG4 4LH (Tel. 01765 689410).

The Current Position

Following discussions and working closely with the Church of England Diocese of Leeds, North Yorkshire County Council is consulting on a proposal to close the school.

The Local Authority has reflected on the school’s position and agree with the conclusion reached by the Governing Body in September 2020 that the school is not viable as a result of a falling pupil roll.

The Local Authority and the Governing Body of Kell Bank Church of England Primary School have not reached this position lightly.

Background

Kell Bank is a Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary school in the Masham area, serving the settlements of Fearby and Healey. The school has worked collaboratively with the Federation of Snape Community and Thornton Watlass CE Primary Schools since 2015. All three schools share the same Executive Headteacher, although Kell Bank has not formally federated with the other two schools and retains a separate governing body. The three schools maximise available opportunities to bring together pupils to share activities and learning opportunities. 

The School was last inspected by Ofsted in October 2013, when there were 45 pupils on roll. The overall effectiveness was judged to be ‘Outstanding’, as were all five contributory judgements. Under the current Ofsted Education Inspection Framework (introduced in September 2019), that level of judgement, given the significant weight on curriculum provision and the low level of pupil numbers at the school, would be difficult to maintain. 

Pupil Numbers

The number of children at Kell Bank CE VC Primary School has been falling over the past few years. At the beginning of September 2019, there were 15 pupils on roll in the school. This was well below the capacity of the school which could accommodate around 50 pupils. The Governing Body and Friends of the School have been active in their collective efforts to raise numbers at the school through many initiatives over recent years. However, since the start of this academic year there has been a further fall in numbers and in September 2020 the school had 6 pupils remaining on roll.

The October 2019 School Census recorded that the majority of primary aged pupils who lived in the school’s catchment area at that time were attending the school (8 pupils attended the school out of a total of 11 pupils who lived in the school’s catchment area). There is unlikely to be any significant new housing in the settlements of Fearby and Healey as they are not Designated Service Villages within the Harrogate District Local Plan.

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Reception

4

5

2

2

3

2

0

Year 1

4

4

5

2

2

3

2

Year 2

7

4

4

2

1

2

2

Year 3

4

5

3

4

2

0

0

Year 4

5

5

5

3

3

3

0

Year 5

6

5

5

5

3

3

0

Year 6

9

5

5

5

5

2

2

Total

39

33

29

23

19

15

6

Forecasts indicate that pupil numbers will not recover in the longer term and may reduce still further.

The Financial Position

Pupil numbers determine the school budget.  With these low numbers, and a reduced budget, the school would have to reduce staff. The school has projected in-year deficits of £17.7k in the financial year 2020/21, £17.5k in 2021/22 and £30k in 2022/23, and cumulative deficits of £2k in 2020/21, £19.5k in 2021/22 and £49.5k in 2022/23. These were based on pupil number assumptions of 16 in 2020/21 and 13 in 2021/22 so the position will be significantly worse now that pupil numbers have fallen and there appears to be no reasonable prospect of recovery.

The Proposal

For the reasons above it is proposed that Kell Bank CE VC Primary School should close with effect from 31 August 2021.

It is also proposed that the catchment area of Masham CE VA Primary School would, in the event of closure, be extended to include the current Kell Bank School catchment area.

Masham is the nearest alternative school to Kell Bank School. Masham School has reached its published admission number in some year groups, although there is capacity in others. The School has a capacity of 116 pupils and a total pupil roll of 121 in September 2020. It is therefore operating around capacity but this is due in part to attendance by pupils who reside in other areas. At the October 2019 census the total roll was 114 pupils of which 43 (37%) came from outside of the school’s catchment area. At the same time there were 85 primary aged pupils living in the catchment area of Masham School and 11 primary aged children living in the catchment area of Kell Bank School. The conclusion is that Masham CE Primary School would be the appropriate choice to adopt the existing Kell Bank catchment area as an addition to its existing area in the event of a closure.

The County Council would welcome views regarding this catchment area proposal as part of this consultation.

Other local schools

For children currently at Kell Bank CE VC Primary School, North Yorkshire County Council will work with each family to try to meet their individual preferences for other schools. Staff and governors at Kell Bank CE VC Primary School are also committed to supporting families in their choice of school and in making a smooth transition in the event of closure.

Other primary schools in the local area are:

  • Masham Church of England (Voluntary Aided) Primary School, 1 Millgate, Market Place, Masham, Ripon, North Yorkshire, HG4 4EG
  • Grewelthorpe Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, Cross Hills, Grewelthorpe, Ripon, North Yorkshire, HG4 3BH
  • St Nicholas, Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, West Tanfield, Ripon HG4 5JN
  • Thornton Watlass Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, Thornton Watlass, Ripon, North Yorkshire, HG4 4AH
  • Kirkby Malzeard Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, Church Street, Kirkby Malzeard, Ripon, North Yorkshire, HG4 3RT
  • Snape Community Primary School, Ings Lane, Snape, Bedale, North Yorkshire, DL8 2TF
  • Fountains Earth Lofthouse Church of England Endowed (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School, Fountains Earth, Lofthouse, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, HG3 5RZ

All these schools were judged ‘Good’ at their last Ofsted inspection.

Parents have a right to express a preference for any school. The Local Authority is the admissions authority for community and voluntary controlled schools and will meet that preference provided there are vacant places, or the school is happy to admit above the published admission number.  In the case of Voluntary Aided schools, the governing body decides the conditions for admission to their particular school. Some schools may be able to admit over their published admission numbers for some year groups.

Eligibility for home-to-school transport will be determined in line with the County Council’s current home-to-school transport policy and procedures, based on travel distances from each child’s home address and individual circumstances. 

Where a child attends a school, which is not their normal school or nearest school, parents are normally responsible for making transport arrangements.  

North Yorkshire County Council’s Admissions Team is always happy to give advice to parents – please contact Karen Crossland on 01609 534825 or Lisa Herdman on 01609 534953.

Primary School places in the local area September 2020


School

Distance by road from Kell Bank  School (miles)

Reception

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Total on roll

Kell Bank CE

N/A

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

6

Masham CE

2.8

Places

Places

PAN

PAN

Places

PAN

Places

121

Grewelthorpe CE

5.8

PAN

Places

PAN

Places

PAN

PAN

PAN

75

St Nicholas West Tanfield CE VC

6.1

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

36

Thornton Watlass CE

6.7

Places

Places

Places

Places

PAN

Places

Places

27

Kirkby Malzeard CE

7.2

Places

PAN

Places

Places

PAN

PAN

Places

85

Snape Community

7.5

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

24

Fountains Earth Lofthouse

7.9

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

16

Middleham CE VA

11.2 via

Main Road

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

45

Spennithorne CE VC

11.3 via Main Road

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

Places

28

PAN = School year group is at published admission number, all applications will be dealt with on an individual basis and Admissions Team will have discussions with appropriate Headteacher to see if the school are in a position to admit additional pupils in that year group.

Pupil number projections, including future demand from housing developments

Swipe or scroll to view full table.

 

Masham CE

  VA

Grewelthorpe  CE VC

St Nicholas West Tanfield CE VC

Thornton Watlass CE VC

 

Kirkby Malzeard CE VC

Snape Community Primary School

Fountains Earth Lofthouse CE Endowed

Middleham

CE VA

Spennithorne CE VC

 

 

Federated with Fountains CE School, Grantley, Ripon 

Federated with Kirby Malzeard

Federated with Snape

Federated with St Nicholas, West Tanfield

Federated with Thornton Watlass

Federated with St Cuthberts, Pateley Bridge

Federated with Spennithorne CE

Federated with Middleham CE VA

Distance from Kell Bank School by road (miles)

2.8

5.8

6.1

6.7

7.2 via Thorpe Road

7.5

7.9

9 miles via Ellingstring & 11.2 via main road 

11.3 via main road

Last Ofsted inspection

Good

July 2019

Good

March 2017

Good

 March 2019

Good

November 2017

Good

March 2018

Good

May 2018

Good

April 2017

Requires Improvement

November 2018

Requires Improvement

May 2019

Net Capacity

(total places at the school)

116

70

70

51

105

52

42

78

83

Current pupil roll 20/21

121

75

36

27

85

24

16

45

28

Current capacity

-/+

-5

-5

34

24

20

28

26

33

55

Pupil roll 2021/22

126

73

37

25

84

27

14

46

29

Pupil roll 2022/23

124

66

32

25

81

26

14

50

30

Pupil roll 2023/24

125

60

31

21

78

25

13

51

30

Pupil roll 2024/25

122

59

28

21

82

27

12

55

29

Pupil roll 2025/26

119

56

28

20

79

27

13

51

29

Potential additional pupils from housing *

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils from outstanding permissions by 2025/26

17

1

12

1

13

1

2

4

2

Potential pupils from future housing – Local Plan (over 15 yrs)

12

0

3

0

12

0

0

0

0

*Based on 1 primary-aged pupil from every 4 houses

Staff

A separate staff consultation process will run in parallel with the consultation on the closure proposal.

The Building

The Diocese have confirmed that the school site, other than the playing field, is vested in the Diocesan Board of Finance. The playing field is owned by the County Council. Decisions about the future use of the school site and buildings will be taken by the owners after the closure proposal has been determined.

What Happens Next?

Your views about this proposal are welcomed.

Complete our survey

The closing date for responses is 21 December 2020

All responses to the consultation received by this date will be considered by the County Council’s Executive on 26 January 2021.

If the County Council’s Executive decides to proceed with the closure proposal, then statutory notices would be published in the local press on 5 February 2021. These notices provide a further four weeks for representations to be made. A final decision would then be made by North Yorkshire County Council’s Executive Committee on 23 March 2021.  If agreed the school would close on 31 August 2021.

Key Dates

All dates subject to approval at each stage.

Consultation opens

2 November  2020

Virtual Public meeting

17 November 2020 at 7pm

Virtual Public meeting

2 December 2020 at 7pm

Consultation closes

21 December 2020

County Council’s Executive considers consultation responses

26 January 2021

Statutory Notices published (4 weeks for representations to be made)

5 February 2021 to 5 March 2021

Final decision by County Council’s Executive

23 March 2021

Proposed school closure date

31 August 2021

This consultation ended on Monday 11 January 2021


We want North Yorkshire to be a thriving county, which adapts to a changing world and remains a special place for everyone to live, work and visit. We also want to prioritise economic growth and invest in the rollout of superfast broadband so that everyone has good access to digital services.

The financial challenges we are facing are set to continue. Our finances have reduced, but demand for our services has increased. Particular pressures include Covid-19 response and recovery, roads, supporting adults and older people who need help to live independently and helping to make sure children and young people have the best possible start in life.

To help shape our council plan and annual budget we want your views on which of our priorities matter most to you. By taking part in this consultation, you will help us decide how we focus our resources in very challenging and uncertain times.

Council plan

The council plan sets out our priorities and actions for the next four years. It includes our key ambitions and explains how we intend to deliver services that meet the needs of people in North Yorkshire.

The council plan sets out our vision and values and describes a three pronged approach - to provide leadership, enable individuals, families and communities to do the best for themselves, and to ensure the delivery of our own high quality services.

To achieve this, the plan identifies five key ambitions:

Ambitions

Supporting outcomes

Leading for North Yorkshire

A confident North Yorkshire championing the case for a fairer share of resources for our communities.

Working with partners and local communities to improve health and economic outcomes for North Yorkshire.

Resilient, resourceful and confident communities co-producing with the County Council.

Every child and young person has the best possible start in life

A healthy start to life with safe and healthy lifestyles.

Education as our greatest liberator with high aspirations, opportunities and achievements.

A happy family life in strong families and vibrant communities.

Every adult has a longer, healthier and independent life

People are safe, with individuals, organisations and communities all playing a part in preventing, identifying and reporting neglect or abuse. 

People have control and choice in relation to their health, independence and social care support. 

People can access good public health services and social care across our different communities.

North Yorkshire is a place with a strong economy & a commitment to sustainable growth

A larger business base and increased number of good quality jobs in North Yorkshire.

People across the county have equal access to economic opportunities

Increased overall average median wage

Innovative and forward thinking Council

Easy and effective access to County Council services.

Challenging ourselves to change, innovate and deliver value for money support services to improve the customer experience.

A motivated and agile workforce working efficiently and effectively to drive innovation.

Operating on a commercial basis, where this is prudent and appropriate, to deliver a return which supports service delivery to those most in need.

See the full council plan here.

We are currently refreshing our council plan for 2021 to 2025.

Longer term plans

A devolution deal for York and North Yorkshire could potentially unlock around £2.4bn of investment over 30 years, with a focus on improving the economic prosperity and future long-term opportunities for all residents through significant investment in transport, broadband, skills and climate change initiatives. 

To be eligible to bid for a devolution deal, the County Council submitted a proposal to government for a single council for North Yorkshire. This would bring together the services currently provided by North Yorkshire County Council, Craven District Council, Hambleton District Council, Harrogate Borough Council, Richmondshire District Council, Ryedale District Council, Scarborough Borough Council and Selby District Council. This would make sizeable savings of £30-67m per year and would deliver improved services in the longer term. 

We are committed to gaining a devolution deal as soon as possible to generate significant funding for the county at a critical moment as we drive economic recovery post-pandemic and to allow more decisions to be made locally by, and for, the people who live and work here.

Find out more about our proposal new unitary council.

Budget

North Yorkshire County Council, like most local authorities, has faced a very challenging financial environment in the last 10 years with significant reductions in government funding but increasing demand. As a result, the county council’s spending power has reduced by more than a third over the last decade. 

If this wasn’t difficult enough there is, of course, the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. We estimate that coronavirus will cost the council an additional £82m this year, taking into account extra essential expenditure and lost income.  This includes outbreak management, test and trace, providing information and support, funding the voluntary sector to support people with shopping, collecting prescriptions and making befriending calls, provision of grants for voluntary organisations, food vouchers, contacting those who were shielding and providing transport for medical appointments.

There have already been significant reductions in council tax and business rates income because of the pandemic and we anticipate that these will continue into the longer term. These are unprecedented and uncertain times.

Despite already making significant savings, we face the prospect of having to take yet more difficult decisions about balancing the council’s finances whilst still protecting key services. As part of this, we want to hear your thoughts about how you think we should manage and prioritise our finances.

Where does the council's money come from?

Our funding comes from four main areas: Council tax, charges to users and similar income, central government grants and business rates.

  • A little under half (47%) of our income is from council tax.
  • Fees, charges and other income make up 26%. These are things we specifically charge for such as parking or care home fees.
  • Allocated government grants and joint funding (e.g. from the NHS) is money we receive that has to be spent on the specific thing it was intended for and makes up 17%.
  • Our business rates give us 10% of our income.

What is the money spent on?

Health and adult services

Older people

£123m

Young adults – learning disabilities

£91m

Other young adults

£29m

Public health

£22m

Other

£6m

Children and young people’s services

Children’s social care

£44m

Home to school transport

£28m

Education support and other

£18m

Special educational needs

£14m

Business and environmental services

Waste

£51m

Highways

£39m

Concessionary fares

£9m

Planning, trading standards, economic development

£8m

Transport fleet

£7m

Public transport

£3m

In addition we have £76m of capital funding that we use to carry out longer term repairs to roads and bridges.

Other

 

Organisational support

£54m

Capital financing

£24m

Customer, communities, libraries

£16m

Property costs

£13m

Others

£24m

The medium-term financial strategy sets out how resources will be put in place to support the delivery of the council plan and to enable priorities and service objectives to be achieved. The strategy can be found on pages 43 to 145 of the executive report to the council appendices booklet.

Savings so far

By the end of the 2020-21 financial year, we will have made revenue savings of around £178m. Focusing our savings on increasing our own efficiency has helped us to keep the impact on front line services to a minimum, but the more we need to save, the more difficult this becomes. Almost three quarters of the savings to date have come from efficiency savings (£136m), including:

£57m - Improved ways of working

£29m - Reducing costs of buying goods and services

£20m - Reductions in support services, back office and administrative support

£21m - Increased income from selling services to schools and other councils

£6m - Reductions in the number of managers

£3m - Reductions in staff terms and conditions

We have tried to protect frontline services and only around a quarter of savings (£42m) so far have come from frontline services. These have included:

  • changes to library services with many now being run by community groups;
  • replacing elderly persons’ homes with extra care housing to better meet the needs of older people, supporting them to retain their independence;
  • changing to a model of providing targeted support to children and young people while reducing the number of children’s centres;
  • public transport; or
  • changes to grass-cutting services.

We need to find a further £103m over the next three years to meet the remaining funding gap. This will be extremely challenging but we are working on plans and proposals.

We have submitted a proposal for a single North Yorkshire Council to make significant savings and improve services but also to unlock around £2.4bn of investment from a devolution deal for York and North Yorkshire. Find out more about our proposal for a new unitary council.

This consultation ended on 4 January 2021


Introduction

North Yorkshire is home to 130,000 children and young people.

Ensuring a good start in life is a shared goal for all parents, families and communities, as well as for the local organisations responsible for health, education, childcare and welfare.

There is an African proverb that it takes a village to raise a child and that is as true in North Yorkshire as it is around the world. Many people play a part in enabling babies, children and young people to grow and develop at key milestones in their lives. North Yorkshire is a good place in which to live as a child or young person, with a good range of childcare provision, high performing schools and well-recognised health and care services for those children, young people and parents who need extra support.

North Yorkshire County Council, in partnership with Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust, is proposing a new model for the Healthy Child Programme (which currently comprises Health Visiting and School Nursing Services) in the county. We want to hear your views about our proposals and how they can be implemented.

The Healthy Child Programme, which supports children and young people aged 0-19 and their families, is one service amongst many. It offers both universal services (services that every child and family should get, such as the new born visit at 10-14 days) for all children, young people and families and targeted help for those most in need.

Proposals

  • We propose intensifying our focus on children under 5, based on the evidence that supporting them has a greater impact throughout life, gives them the best start in life and prepares them to be ready to learn.
  • We want to secure longer term funding and certainty for the Healthy Child Programme in North Yorkshire, within the context of the national reduction in Public Health Grant which is the main source of funding for the service.
  • We propose extending and developing the partnership between North Yorkshire County Council and Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust (HDFT), to provide the service for a period of up to ten years, taking us to 2031.
  • We want to learn from the emergency changes made to the current service during the response to Covid-19.
  • We propose implementing a new service model as a result of all of the above factors.

Our commitments

In putting these proposals forward, we are making clear pledges to you.

  • All children and young people will receive universal and targeted services to enable them to have the best start in life, through our work in children’s ‘early help’ and social care, schools and community support for children and young people with additional needs. ‘Early help’ provides support when need is identified at any point in a child’s life. It is not a specific service but a joined up approach across all service providers to work with children, young people and families to prevent the need for statutory/costly interventions.
  • We will prioritise our public health grant-funded Healthy Child Programme towards children under five, to support their early development and to ensure that they are ready to learn.
  • All new-born babies and their parent(s)/carer(s) will have a face-to-face visit from a qualified Health Visitor.
  • We will continue to provide targeted support for 5-19 year olds, through a range of different programmes and services.
  • Our Healthy Child 0-19 services will combine a mix of face-to-face, online, individual and group work services, tailored to the personal circumstances of each family.
  • We will continue to work with children and families, local service providers in the public and private sector, and voluntary and community groups to ensure that the right support is provided by the right person and at the right time.

What is the Healthy Child Programme?

The Healthy Child Programme is a national health promotion and early support programme for children, young people and their families. It aims to bring together health, education and other partners to deliver an effective programme of services and support. There is a mandatory requirement to provide some elements of the programme.

The programme is currently comprised of the following services.

  • An evidence-based approach for the delivery of public health services to families with children aged 0-5, led by Health Visitors.
  • Early intervention and prevention public health programmes for children and young people aged 5-19 and their families. These build on the pregnancy to 0-5 service and are led by school nurses.

Since the transfer of Public Health services to councils in April 2013, the Healthy Child Programme has been paid for by local government, under the direction of the Director of Public Health. Most councils, but not all, have worked with an NHS partner to provide the service. In North Yorkshire, until now, Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust has provided separate services for children aged 0-5 and 5-19.

How is the service provided currently?

The current service can be summarised as follows.

0-5 Years - Health visiting 5-19 Years - School nursing

5 mandatory health reviews

  • Antenatal (28 weeks) check: Health promoting visit
  • 10-14 days after birth: New baby review
  • 6-8 weeks old: 6-8 week assessment
  • 9-12 months old: One year assessment
  • 2-2½ years old (two to two-and a half-year integrated review)

A range of services and support given to families.

5 Health reviews

  • 4-5 year old health needs assessment
  • 10-11 year-old health needs assessment
  • Screening service
    • National Child Measurement Programme which measures the height and weight of children and brief advice given to families if child is overweight or obese (mandatory requirement)
    • Vision and hearing screening at school entry
  • Support for emotional wellbeing and resilience and  reducing risk-taking in young people.

As such, the Healthy Child Programme forms part of a comprehensive network of children and young people’s services commissioned and provided by North Yorkshire County Council, the NHS and other partners in the county. It means that there is an extensive range of support for all children, young people and their families, as well as extra help for those who need it most. Many of the children’s services provided by North Yorkshire County Council and Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust are rated by the regulators, Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission, as outstanding or good.

The range and quality of children and young people’s services in the county puts North Yorkshire in a relatively good position when public services are faced with significant cuts in the funding they receive from Central Government. In this case, we are facing a year on year cut of up to £4 million in the Public Health Grant for North Yorkshire.

It is within this context that the County Council is proposing changes to the Healthy Child Programme, with a view to making savings while ensuring that all children continue to have the best start in life and have access to the right support as they grow into adulthood.

Why are we proposing to change the service?

There are three main reasons why we are proposing to change the current service.

The national Public Health Grant is being reduced.

This means that North Yorkshire will lose up to £4 million funding and all Public Health programmes will have to make savings as a consequence. Indeed, some will stop altogether. These proposals, alongside investment in children and young people’s emotional and mental well-being and services to reduce drug and alcohol misuse, mean that a third of the Public Health Grant available to the County will continue to be spent on children and young people. This translates to 33% of Public Health Grant being spent on children and young people who constitute about 22% of the North Yorkshire population.

The savings from the Healthy Child Programme budget is £750,000 over three years.

Our priority is to focus on children aged under five

The foundations of a healthy life are set in early childhood and in North Yorkshire we wish to prioritise investment in children aged 0-5 years in order to ensure they have the best start in life.  In the context of the reduction in the Public Health Grant, the council seeks to secure this through a long term funding arrangement for the Healthy Child Programme for a period of up to 10 years.  There is evidence that indicates a focus on 0-5 years does not only support improving health outcomes, but improves wider societal and economic outcomes. National policy related to providing the best start in life provides further evidence that increasing investment in children aged 0-5 years can impact on childhood obesity, emotional wellbeing and school readiness. Improvements in these areas will in turn support lifelong positive outcomes.

The universal elements of the Healthy Child Programme identify children and families who are at risk of poor outcomes and who are in need of additional support.  Focussing assessment on children aged 0-5 means the most vulnerable families can be provided with additional support at the earliest opportunity. Health visitors and their teams are skilled practitioners who build parental confidence and can ensure families receive early help before problems develop further. This approach can not only improve the life chances of the child but should reduce demand for higher cost specialist services as the child grows older and, later, in adult life.

We have learned from how services have operated under Covid-19 restrictions

The pandemic has changed how we deliver the current service for the long-term. The profound impact of the virus on society and on public services means that people have been using services differently and some staff have developed new roles and skills. As national lockdown is easing, the current service is recovering but it will never return to the pre-Covid-19 status because of the emergency changes we implemented. This consultation is proposing to learn from the service that has been provided during the Covid-19 pandemic. For example, many families have given feedback saying that access to advice over the telephone, on face time or online has been really helpful to them.

The service will use tools that have been shown to be effective in identifying and measuring risks to assess family need and risk, and ensure that families most in need receive face-to-face contacts.

What will the proposed new service look like?

Most parents and carers can confidently support their child’s development, but some experience challenges that can make this task more difficult. Factors such as poor mental health, financial hardship or ongoing conflict in a relationship all influence parents’ ability to provide a nurturing environment for their child. There are a range of health promotion activities, support and practices which have good evidence of improving outcomes for children, by working directly with children themselves and helping parents or practitioners to support children’s development.

The new service will focus on health promotion activities and early support. It will be an integrated 0-19 service that brings together many aspects of what is currently provided by the health visiting (0-5) and School Nursing (5-19) services. We will continue to provide all of the mandatory elements of the service for all age groups. For a small number of families, this may be through a virtual or digital offer. There will be universal and targeted provision with a focus on families with children under the age of five, delivered by appropriately trained, skilled teams. This approach will be an important way of providing children and young people with the skills and resilience they need to achieve a variety of important positive health and wellbeing effects, including increased physical and mental wellbeing, educational attainment, and reduced youth crime and anti-social behaviour.

The new service will build on learning about how services have operated under Covid-19 restrictions, introducing a blended approach of face-to-face and online contact for families, based on robust assessment of the child and family’s needs; Families and young people have engaged with services in a way that is relevant and appropriate to their needs and staff have developed new skills to support them in doing so. For example, some people have opted to get extra support online, including peer support from, and group work with, other families.

For under 5s, the proposals prioritise infant feeding and family diet and nutrition and childrens’ readiness to learn as areas for improvement in the new service. For children and young people aged 5-19, the proposals prioritise emotional health and resilience and risk taking behaviour as areas for improvement in the new service. This will allow greater integration of the NHS-led Healthy Child Programme with the County Council’s Children and Young People’s Service and other relevant services across health and social care.

The new service will be delivered through a partnership between North Yorkshire County Council and Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust, using what’s called a Section 75 Agreement (which gives powers to local authorities to delegate the provision of services to an NHS Foundation Trust). There will be a separate 30-day public consultation on the partnership agreement in the winter of 2020/2021.

How will the new service be different from the current service?

The proposed new service is significantly different from the current service in a number of ways. It will continue to deliver universal services for all families and will also allow for resources to be targeted to those most in need. Protecting children at risk of harm and those in need remains the top priority.

The main changes are as follows.

  • All new babies will have a face-to-face visit from a Health Visitor, and follow up visits will be either face-to-face or online, depending on the family’s needs and identified risks.
  • Services will be provided face-to-face or virtually dependent on family need and identified risks.
  • All contacts with children under one year will be undertaken by a qualified health visitor.
  •  Contacts with families with a child over one year old will be delivered by a skilled team under the direction of a health visitor. This approach will allow for a co-ordinated and integrated approach in responding to needs.
  • Some of the services provided to school aged children (5-19) such as vision and hearing screening, and advice and support about daytime and night time wetting for school age children will not be provided.
  • Support for emotional wellbeing and resilience and in reducing risk taking in young people will be enhanced.
  • We are working closely with local partners (Families, Clinical Commissioning Groups, Primary Care, NHS Hospitals, Voluntary Organisations and Community Groups) to ensure that children and families are supported to access alternative services, for the aspects of the current service that will no longer be delivered with the new service.  We will ensure that children, young people and families and the wider public have the information on how to access alternative services and support.

What does our equality impact assessment say?

We have carried out an equality impact assessment (EIA).

Equality impact assessments ensure that our policies, services and legislation do not discriminate against anyone and that, where possible, we promote equality of opportunity.

We will update this following comments received during the consultation and the North Yorkshire County Council Executive and the Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust Board will consider it again before a final decision is made on implementing the new service. The EIA has identified that there will be an impact on children and young people receiving some aspects of the service that will no longer be provided and we will offer support to families to adapt to those changes.  The strength of North Yorkshire’s full range of children and young people’s services will help families to get the support that they need.

We anticipate that, if these proposals are implemented, the new service will have a positive impact for children, young people and their families, particularly as there will be a single, more integrated 0-19 service across the county which will lead to a more responsive service for children and families. However, we recognise that aspects of the current service delivery model will not be delivered and the partnership will carry out an analysis of the gaps in services to be fully aware of potential risks.

A combination of face-to-face, online and group based service delivery can increase and improve how children and families can be supported. We anticipate that by making joint decisions with families, health and social care providers and schools, the right care and support will be available in a timely manner and that, by greater joint working, we will increase and improve how children and families are supported.

How to have your say on these proposals

We want to hear your views on the proposals and, in particular on the following three questions:

  1. In the context of a national reduction in North Yorkshire’s Public Health Grant of up to £4 million in the next few years, do you support the proposals to prioritise children under 5, and their families, so that they have the best start in life?
  2. In the context of a national reduction in North Yorkshire’s Public Health Grant of up to £4 million in the next few years, do you support the proposals for 5-19 year olds which are focussed on,
    • supporting vulnerable young people
    • developing a service to help young people improve their emotional resilience and wellbeing.

How would you see that support being provided to children and young people?

  1. We have learned from how we had to adapt during the Covid-19 pandemic, and in future, we want to deliver some of the Healthy Child Programme online and via the telephone.

How do you think digital and telephone services could help support families in North Yorkshire?

Answer these questions, tell us your views and give us your suggestions

This survey has now closed.

See an easy read version of this consultation.

Online events

You can also register for an online event to hear about our proposals and ask questions:

Date

Time

Register

3 November 2020

10:30

This event has passed.

5 November 2020

13:30

This event has passed.

6 November 2020

10:30

This event has passed.

17 November 2020

10:30

This event has passed.

18 November 2020

18:00

This event has passed.

19 November 2020

13:30

This event has passed.

Unfortunately, due to Covid-19 restrictions, it is unlikely that we will be able to host face-to-face events during this consultation

How long is the consultation?

This will be a 10-week consultation beginning on Monday 26 October 2020 and ending on Monday 4 January 2021 The feedback received will be presented to NYCC and HDFT Executives, and subject to the outcome of the consultation it is anticipated the new service will be in place on 1 April 2021.

What happens after the consultation closes?

The responses received during this public consultation will be considered by North Yorkshire County Council’s Executive, as well as its Scrutiny of Health Committee, and by Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust Board, before any final decision is made.

Subject to the outcome of this consultation and due consideration, it is proposed that the new service will begin on 1 April 2021.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is this public consultation about?

This consultation is about the proposals for an integrated 0-19 Healthy Child Service, which includes Health Visiting (0-5) and School Aged (5-19) services, and the proposed new model for delivery of the mandated contacts and targeted support for families.

What is the Healthy Child Programme?

The Healthy Child Programme is a national public health programme for children, young people and their families. It aims to bring together health, education and other partners to deliver an effective programme of early intervention, prevention and support. There is a statutory requirement for the Council to provide some elements of the programme.

NHS health visitors lead the delivery of public health services and support to families, from pregnancy to children aged 0-5.

School nurses lead some of the public health services and support for children, young people (aged 5-19) and their families.

Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust currently provides the Healthy Child Programme in North Yorkshire.

Why a new service model is being proposed?

The national Public Health Grant in North Yorkshire has reduced by up to £4 million. As a result, North Yorkshire County Council will have to make savings across all Public Health programmes. Some programmes have stopped or will stop.

In the context of the reduction in Public Health Grant, we are prioritising children aged 0-5. This is based on the evidence that increasing investment in children during their early years can positively affect many areas of a child’s life, which in turn support lifelong positive outcomes.

We have also prioritised support for vulnerable young people and emotional resilience and wellbeing in children and young people.

Protecting children at risk of harm and those in need remains the top priority for the programme.

We are looking to continue our relationship with Harrogate and District Foundation Trust for a longer term of up to 10 years. This will provide the opportunity to transform the way we provide services to children and families, and help closely align the programme with the Early Help Service run by the County Council’s Children and Young People’s Service, as well as other health services and community support.

How will vulnerable children and young people be supported?

There will be no significant change to the health visitors’ role in local safeguarding procedures and processes.

The School Aged (5-19) Safeguarding Model includes a team aligned with the North Yorkshire Multi-Agency Screening Team (MAST) to support safeguarding procedures where it is deemed appropriate for the service to be engaged beyond the initial strategy meeting. The new model for children and young people aged 5-19 includes a specialist team of nurses to support children subject to a child protection plan and children who are looked after. The model adheres to the North Yorkshire Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Practices.

What difference will the new service model make to children, young people and families?

Every family with a child under 5 years will receive the five mandatory health reviews. The service will aim to deliver on 100% of contacts with a focus on face to face delivery for key contacts (the five health reviews detailed in the table in the ‘How is this service provided currently’ section) and families identified as requiring face to face/ home visits through a robust Family Health Needs Assessment. Some contacts will be carried out using virtual methods based on robust risk assessment.

However, because of the reduction in Public Health grant and the focus on children under 5, the programme will not be able to provide the level of service that has previously been provided to school aged children (5-19). Some of the services that have stopped or will stop include:

  • Hearing and vision screening at school entry
  • Perinatal mental health listening visits (support for women who may experience anxiety and depression during pregnancy and after childbirth)
  • Drop-ins in schools – to offer advice and support on health and wellbeing issues (e.g. children with asthma and sexual health support)
  • Level 1 continence support (advice and support about daytime and night time wetting) for school age children
  • Sexual health services
  • Sign off school health care plans
  • School entry and Year 6 health questionnaires

How will I get support for the services that are stopping?

The Healthy Child Programme is only one source of support and information for children and families, and they are often in contact with many services and agencies. The proposals present the opportunity for closer working between the programme and other health and social services and community support, to ensure support that meets the individual needs of children, young people and families.

We are therefore working together to develop systems and processes that will enable families and young people to access the support they need. Some of these are explained below.

Families with children under 5 years

Will I still have a named health visitor?

Every family with a child under 5 years will have a named health visitor.

Will all child health clinics close? How will babies be weighed?

Well Baby Clinics will not be offered as part of the proposed model. Babies will be weighed in line with the recommendations in the Healthy Child Programme for example when targeted support is required to support with infant feeding or where babies need targeted support to monitor development.

The service will assess community need and use venues to provide group support to meet the needs of the local population. For example, group activities to support breast feeding or maternal mental health/ perinatal mental health and attachment.

How will perinatal mental health concerns be identified and supported if perinatal mental health listening visits no longer take place?

The Health Visitor will identify maternal mental health needs through the Family Health Needs Assessment and assessment of risk factors. Targeted support may be provided through listening visits (support for women who may experience anxiety and depression during pregnancy and after childbirth) or group activity or signposting to online support and activities.

How will young parents be supported?

Young parents will continue to be considered a vulnerable group and will receive all five mandated contacts and targeted support when required.

Children and young people (5-19)

Will my school have a named school nurse?

No, there will not be capacity in the 5-19 workforce to provide a named school nurse for each school. The service will develop online support available to schools. The emotional health and resilience team will provide targeted support to children and young people at Tier 1 Children and Adolescent Mental Health Service level (early support for children and young people with low level emotional and mental health issues).

What will happen if parents have concerns about their child’s hearing?

Hearing will be considered at all 0-5 health reviews. At any point health visitors can refer direct to audiology for a hearing test. We are also developing ways that will enable professionals (e.g. teachers and GPs) to refer children with hearing problems to hospital audiology services for a hearing test. 

What will happen if parents have concerns about their child’s vision?

Routine eye checks are offered to newborn babies and young children to identify any problems early. Free NHS sight tests are also available at opticians for children under 16 and for young people under 19 in full-time education.

Who will sign off school health care plans for children and young people with managed asthma, epilepsy and diabetes?

There is not a formal requirement for health care plans to be “signed off” by a health professional. However, the health professional overseeing the child’s care would be asked to input into the plan. This can be any health professional and would only be a school nurse if they are overseeing the child's care

Who will provide continence support (advice and support about daytime and night time wetting) for school age children?

We are developing ways that families can access the information they need to self-manage these conditions at the level 1 (low level) stage.

Who will provide sexual health advice and support?

The Council will continue to support the delivery of quality Personal, Social and Health Education (PHSE) and implementation of statutory relationships and sex education (SRE) in schools.  The service will provide effective signposting to local sexual health services.

Monthly GP liaison will stop and will be delivered differently. What does this mean?

The current process for GP liaison about children, young people and families will be reviewed. We will discuss how the health visiting and school nursing services liaise with practices in partnership with GPs once the new model is agreed.

Glossary

Local organisations

A local organisation is an organisation which delivers services or activities in a particular area. For us this means within the North Yorkshire boundary in one or all of the 7 local district or borough areas.

Universal services

Services that every child and family should get for example the new born visit at 10-14 days.

Targeted services

Services that are for people with specific needs, for example the emotional and mental wellbeing service for young people.

Early help

Early Help provides support when need is identified at any point in a child’s life. It is not a specific service but a joined up approach across all service providers to work with children, young people and families to prevent the need for statutory/costly interventions.

Public sector agencies

Public sector agencies are organisations which deliver Government provided services such as North Yorkshire County and District Councils or partners such as Harrogate District Foundation Trust

Evidence based approach

An approach where research has proven that services and support work well. This approach helps us to agree what to carry on doing and what to change.

Evidence based tools

Evidence based tools can be things like questionnaires, interviews, observations, risk assessments. These tools can help us to identify what works well and what does not.

Commissioned services

This is where the local authority (e.g. NYCC) has asked and appointed a provider to deliver a particular service. For example, NYCC has commissioned HDFT to provide parts of the Healthy Child Programme like health visiting and school nursing services.

Outcomes

We want any services we provide to be able to support you and your child to have a healthy start. This is an ‘outcome’ of the service commissioned.

Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs)

CCGs are groups of general practices (GPs) which come together in each area to commission the best services for their patients and population.

Primary care

This is the first point of contact with the health care system. Primary care includes general practice, community pharmacy, dental, and optometry (eye health) services.

Gap analysis

An analysis of the gaps in services, which should include what needs to be done to address them.

Mandated contacts

Mandatory visits that every family with a child under five receives from the health visitor to carry out health reviews. 

Key mandated contacts/visits

  • Antenatal (28 weeks) check: health promoting visit
  • 10-14 days after birth: new baby review
  • 6-8 weeks old: 6-8 week assessment
  • 9-12 months old: one year assessment
  • 2-2½ years old (two to two-and a half-year integrated review)

Child Protection Plan

This is a plan made after a child has been the subject of a Child Protection case conference.

Local safeguarding procedures and processes

These are guidelines and activities that explain what the council will do to keep children and young people safe.

Tier 1 services

Early support for children and young people with low level emotional and mental health issues.

This consultation ended on 23 October


We are consulting on a proposal to establish a new mainstream primary school, to primarily serve the North Northallerton Development Area. The proposed new school will also support general school place sufficiency in Northallerton.

It is intended that the new school will be a free school (a state-funded school, operating as an academy, independent of the local authority) in accordance with Department for Education guidance.

The age range of the school will be 4-11, providing places for 210 pupils (one form of entry) with the ability to expand to 420 places (two forms of entry) should that be required in the future. The school will provide places for boys and girls (mixed). 

The expected opening date is September 2022.

Background

The North Northallerton Development Area (NNDA) covers approximately 50 hectares and is identified as the strategic site for development and growth in Northallerton.

The NNDA is expected to contain 859 houses, running in a northern band between Stokesley Road and Darlington Road. Development has started, leaving 649 dwellings to be completed and occupied. The latest indications are that a build rate of 120 dwellings per year is expected

Hambleton’s Local Plan has been revised and a further 670 houses are being added to the east of the existing NNDA. This forms part of c.1380 dwellings which, it is proposed, are to be constructed in Northallerton in the medium to long-term:

Site name

Expected no. of dwellings

Status

Multiple sites

65

Planning permission granted – several small sites at various stages

North Northallerton

646

Planning permission granted – under construction

Multiple sites

671

 

Local Plan sites – planning permission not yet granted

Since existing housing in Northallerton is concentrated to the south of the town, the existing schools in Northallerton are also clustered in the south. These schools are becoming increasingly full as primary pupil numbers are now rising alongside housing growth.

School

Type of School

Alverton Primary

Community School

Applegarth Primary

Community School

Brompton Community Primary

Community School

Broomfield

Community School

Mill Hill Community Primary

Community School

Romanby Primary

Community School

Sacred Heart RC Primary

Academy

The above schools are collectively close to their operational capacity and there are limited opportunities to expand these schools further.

The effects of the pandemic on the rate of house building and the housing market generally is not yet known. There is therefore potential that, having commenced the required process, NYCC may subsequently decide that September 2022 ceases to be the desired opening date. The situation will be kept under review.

Demand for a new school site

It is considered that a new school site should be developed to serve the immediate growth area formed by the NNDA, and also support general school place sufficiency in Northallerton for the medium to long-term.

The impact of all of the planned housing could not be met by expanding existing school sites in Northallerton. A significant portion of the NNDA falls into the catchment area for Applegarth Primary School. Applegarth School is landlocked by housing and therefore has no scope for expansion.  This was a key factor in the initial consideration of whether Northallerton’s existing primary schools could be expanded, or whether a new school would be required. 

Along with Applegarth, the NNDA also falls into the catchment areas of Alverton and Brompton Primary Schools. There is now an upward trend in pupil numbers at primary phase, particularly in younger age groups, which will increase pressure on school places across the town.  As a result, it is anticipated that by 2022/23 Applegarth, Brompton, Alverton and Romanby Primary Schools will all reach their capacity.

On the basis of the current forecasts including extra pupils arising from housing, it is anticipated that a new school site would be needed from September 2022 onwards (see proposed school location).  The projected shortfall of places would continue to rise, largely due to the impacts of new housing, from 2023 onwards without the introduction of additional provision.

It is assumed that the new school would initially open for Reception pupils only. The second year of opening would see Reception and Year 1 pupils accommodated, adding a further year group for the third year and beyond until a full roll of 210 is achieved. This is quite a common opening profile for newly established schools and helps to avoid destabilising existing provision.

There is no proposal for nursery provision on site, although it could be included in any future expansion to 2 form entry should that become necessary. Northallerton already has a wide range of childcare providers who offer childcare and education for children from birth to five.  This is offered through a mixed model of provision and includes 8 private nurseries offering full day care and most of whom also offer out of school provision for older children. Additionally, there are 9 childminders along with Romanby School’s pre-school and out of school club.  Rosedene Nursery has recently moved to premises at Broomfield school and Sacred Heart School will be offering nursery provision in this location from Autumn this year. 

Funding and site

The local authority has the statutory duty to ensure that sufficient school places are available.  It receives capital funding to address this ‘basic need’, although it is acknowledged by central government that this funding does not meet the full costs of providing additional pupil places.

It was identified in the early stages of planning for the NNDA that the development of a school site would be required. An agreement has been signed which secures both the site and a developer’s contribution of around £950k towards the construction costs. The site has capacity for future expansion if required to a total of Primary 420 places (2 form entry).  The required land transfer is currently being progressed.

A planning application for the design and layout was submitted under reference number NY/2019/0220/FUL. Planning permission was granted on 1 September 2020. Having this approval provides confidence that the remaining processes to establish the school can now commence.

The County Council’s Executive has approved an initial budget allocation for this scheme made up of both funding received from central government and the amount expected from the developer’s contribution.

Costs of developing a new school

The cost of developing a new school building on the site provided in Northallerton  will be determined by the required procurement exercise which will commence in Autumn 2020. However, based on known projects elsewhere, it is considered that the cost of a new school on this site might be in the region of £5m to £6m. 

Admission arrangements

The Academy Trust chosen to operate the School would determine the oversubscription criteria for admissions purposes. NYCC intend to propose that the new Northallerton School would not have a defined catchment area. Instead, we would  propose that priority for admission to the School would be determined by proximity to it. Catchment areas in Northallerton are historical and did not anticipate the NNDA which cuts across sections of the catchment areas for Alverton, Applegarth and Brompton schools.  There are no obvious natural boundaries with which to create a new catchment and we do not support arbitrarily introducing new boundaries by taking areas from Applegarth, Brompton and Alverton’s existing catchment areas. To do so  would disadvantage existing families and schools.

The presumption route process

It is no longer possible, unless all other options have been exhausted, for the local authority to open a new community school. Under the government’s Academy presumption it is assumed that any wholly new school will be an Academy. The local authority is required to ask for expressions of interest from sponsors to allow the Secretary of State to decide whether to enter into a funding agreement with a particular academy trust for the running of the school.

The proposed new school is therefore expected to be a mainstream free school under the DfE free school presumption process.

The formal statutory consultation, which sponsors are required to undertake under section 10 of the Academies Act 2010, takes place during the pre-opening phase of the school i.e. after the sponsor has been selected, and is not part of this process.

Who are we consulting?

Copies of this document have been sent to the governing bodies of all local schools as well as to the Church of England and Roman Catholic Dioceses, Councillors, Early Years providers, parish, town and district councils, unions and professional associations and the local MP.

The Council is consulting generally at this stage to invite any comments on aspects of the proposal prior to publishing the specification for the proposed new school. Planning permission for the specific design and layout was granted on 1 September 2020.

Responses

Because of current restrictions we are unable to hold a local drop-in session.  However, we welcome your feedback on the proposals by completing a response form online.

Give your feedback

What happens after the consultation finishes?

All the responses received by the closing date will be included in a report to the Children and Young People’s Service Executive Members on 3 November 2020. Responses from individuals will be anonymised.

Summary of proposals

School type

Mainstream primary

Age range

4-11

Reception to Year 6

Published admission number

30

Size / Capacity

210 places

Opening date

September 2022

Opening profile

First year of operation:

Reception only

Second year:

Reception and Year 1

Adding a further year group for the third year of operation and beyond until full opening is achieved

Admission arrangements

Oversubscription criteria to be determined by the chosen Academy Trust.

NYCC intend to propose that the new Northallerton School would not have a defined catchment area. Instead priority for admission to the School would be determined by proximity to it.

Proposed school location

A map showing the location of the proposed new school in Northallerton

If you need this information in an alternative format please contact us.

Primary Pupil Forecast for Northallerton

North Northallerton Primary School Places 2021/
2022
2022/
2023
2023/
2024
2024/
2025
2025/
2026
2026/
2027
2027/
2028
2028/
2029
2029/
2030
2030/
2031
Pupil forecast excluding pupils from housing developments 1410 1457 1451 1468 1482 1481 1470 1496 1465 1460
Pupil forecast including pupil yield from approved applications 1469 1546 1573 1623 1660 1659 1648 1647 1643 1638
Pupil forecast including pupil yield from approved applications and known Local Plan proposals 1469 1547 1582 1649 1706 1725 1734 1753 1769 1771
Current available school places 1505 1505 1505 1505 1505 1505 1505 1505 1505 1505
Available school places including new school of 210 places   1715 1715 1715 1715 1715 1715 1715 1715 1715

A graph showing Primary Pupil Forecast for Northallerton

This consultation ended on 23 October


We are consulting on a proposal to establish a new mainstream primary school including nursery provision, to primarily serve the Manse Farm development in Knaresborough and the proposed Highfield Farm development.

The proposed new school will also support general school place sufficiency in the Knaresborough area.

It is intended that the new school will be a free school (a state-funded school, operating as an academy, independent of the local authority) in accordance with Department for Education guidance.

The age range of the school will be 3-11, providing places for 210 pupils (one form of entry) with the ability to expand to 420 places (two forms of entry) should that be required in the future. The school will provide places for boys and girls (mixed).  

The expected opening date is September 2022.

Background

Manse Farm is a housing development in Knaresborough town which was given reserved matters planning approval for 600 dwellings in 2017 (17/05491/REMMAJ). Development on the site started in 2019, initially with some of the required highway infrastructure. The latest indications are that a build rate of 80 units per year is expected with first occupations in 2021/22. This development forms part of the c.1,400 dwellings which, it is proposed, are to be constructed in Knaresborough in the medium to long-term as part of the recently adopted Harrogate Local Plan:

Site name

Expected no. of dwellings

Status

Multiple sites

269

Planning permission granted – sites at various stages

Manse Farm

600

Planning permission granted – under construction

K25 Highfield Farm

402

Site allocated in Local Plan– planning permission not yet granted

Multiple sites

178

Sites allocated in Local Plan– planning permission not yet granted

There are a number of primary schools in Knaresborough Town and the area around the Manse Farm development site that are becoming increasingly full as primary pupil numbers are now rising alongside housing growth.

School

Type of School

Aspin Park Academy

Academy

Goldsborough CoE Primary School

Voluntary Controlled School

Knaresborough St John’s CoE Primary School

Academy

Meadowside Primary Academy

Academy

St Mary’s Catholic Primary School

Academy

The above schools are collectively close to their operational capacity and there are limited opportunities to expand these schools further.

The effects of the pandemic on the rate of house building and the housing market generally is not yet known. There is therefore potential that, having commenced the required process, NYCC may subsequently decide that September 2022 ceases to be the desired opening date. The situation will be kept under review.

Demand for a new school site

It is considered that a new school site should be developed to serve the pupils arising from the Manse Farm and the proposed Highfield Farm development sites. The impact of all of the planned housing could not be met by expanding existing school sites in Knaresborough Town and at Goldsborough, and there is a need to ensure that pupil places are available as the remaining housing comes on stream.

On the basis of the current forecasts including extra pupils arising from housing, it is anticipated that a new school site would be needed from September 2022 onwards (see Figure 1). The projected shortfall of places would continue to rise, largely due to the impacts of new housing, from 2023 onwards without the introduction of additional provision.

It is assumed that the new school would initially open for nursery and reception pupils. The second year of opening would see Nursery, Reception and Year 1 pupils accommodated, adding a further year group for the third year and beyond until a full roll of 210 is achieved. This is quite a common opening profile for newly established schools and helps to avoid destabilising existing provision.

Finding and site

The local authority has the statutory duty to ensure that sufficient school places are available.  It receives capital funding to address this ‘basic need’, although it is acknowledged by central government that this funding does not meet the full costs of providing additional pupil places.

It was identified in the early stages of planning for Manse Farm that the development of a school site would be required. An agreement has been signed which secures both the site and a developer’s contribution of around £2m towards the construction costs. The site has capacity for future expansion if required to a total of Primary 420 places (2 form entry).  The required land transfer is currently being progressed.

A planning application for the design and layout was submitted under reference number NY/2019/0215/FUL. Planning permission was granted on 11 June 2020. Having this approval provides confidence that the remaining processes to establish the school can now commence.

The County Council’s Executive has approved an initial budget allocation for this scheme made up of both funding received from central government and the amount expected from the developer’s contribution.

Cost of delivering a new school

The cost of developing a new school building on the site provided at Manse Farm will be determined by the required procurement exercise which will commence in Autumn 2020. However, based on known projects elsewhere, it is considered that the cost of a new school on this site might be in the region of £5m to £6m.  

Admission arrangements

The proposed new school will provide additional school place capacity for the whole of Knaresborough town and the immediate area. However, it will primarily serve the development area formed by the Manse Farm and Highfield Farm sites in which there is currently no housing. NYCC intend to propose that the new school should have a defined catchment area based on the boundaries of the new development sites. This would mean that for admission purposes residents of the new development would have priority for places in the event of oversubscription. This would enable the new school to best serve its immediate local area and reduce the need for journeys to alternative schools.

The nearest schools to the Manse Farm development are Knaresborough St John’s CE Primary School and Aspin Park Academy. Manse Farm falls within the current catchment area of Knaresborough St John’s. The Highfield Farm development falls within the current Goldsborough CE Primary School catchment area. Neither of the existing catchment schools have the capacity to absorb the impact of the new housing and the LA preference would be for a future reduction in the extent of their catchment areas. However, decisions around the continuation or variation of the existing catchment arrangements for these two schools would require a separate process.

The Presumption route process

It is no longer possible, unless all other options have been exhausted, for the local authority to open a new community school. Under the government’s Academy presumption it is assumed that any wholly new school will be an Academy. The local authority is required to ask for expressions of interest from sponsors to allow the Secretary of State to decide whether to enter into a funding agreement with a particular academy trust for the running of the school.

The proposed new school is therefore expected to be a mainstream free school under the DfE free school presumption process.

The formal statutory consultation, which sponsors are required to undertake under section 10 of the Academies Act 2010, takes place during the pre-opening phase of the school i.e. after the sponsor has been selected, and is not part of this process.

Who are we consulting?

Copies of this document have been sent to the governing bodies of all local schools as well as to the Church of England and Roman Catholic Dioceses, Councillors, Early Years providers, parish, town and district councils, unions and professional associations and the local MP.

The Council is consulting generally at this stage to invite any comments on aspects of the proposal prior to publishing the specification for the proposed new school. Planning permission for the specific design and layout was granted on 11 June 2020.

Responses

Because of current restrictions we are unable to hold a local drop-in session.  However, we welcome your feedback on the proposals by completing a response form online.

Closing date is 23 October 2020 at 5pm.

What happens after the consultation finishes?

All the responses received by the closing date will be included in a report to the Children and Young People’s Service Executive Members on 3 November 2020.  Responses from individuals will be anonymised.

Summary of proposals

School type

Mainstream primary

Age range

3-11

Nursery to Year 6

Published admission number

30

Size / Capacity

210 places plus nursery

Opening date

September 2022

Opening profile

First year of operation:

Nursery and Reception only

Second year:

Nursery, Reception and Year 1

Adding a further year group for the third year of operation and beyond until full opening is achieved

Admission arrangements

Oversubscription criteria to be determined by the chosen Academy Trust.

NYCC intend to propose that a defined catchment area be established for the area covered by the Manse Farm and Highfield Farm developments.

Proposed school location

Map showing the proposed location of the new school in Knaresborough

If you need this information in an alternative format please contact us.

Primary Pupil forecast for Manse Farm, Knaresborough

Primary Pupil forecast for Manse Farm, Knaresborough 2021/
2022
2022/
2023
2023/
2024
2024/
2025
2025/
2026
2026/
2027
2027/
2028
2028/
2029
2030/
2031
2031/
2032
Pupil forecast excluding pupils from housing developments 1224 1211 1224 1220 1207 1205 1205 1196 1188 1181
Pupil forecast including pupil yield from approved applications 1239 1310 1364 1402 1399 1407 1417 1413 1405 1398
Pupil forecast including pupil yield from approved applications and known Local Plan proposals 1239 1310 1419 1486 1510 1545 1555 1551 1543 1536
Current available school places   1319 1319 1319 1319 1319 1319 1319 1319 1319
Available school places including new school of 210 places   1529 1529 1529 1529 1529 1529 1529 1529 1529

Graph showing Primary Pupil forecast for Manse Farm, Knaresborough