Find out what measures are in place across the county to help maintain social distancing and encourage more active travel

Complaints about lack of social distancing

We are working with district councils to support businesses and make sure they adhere to social distancing guidance, however if you have any concerns, please contact your district council initially.


Working with our partners in district and borough councils, the police and the national parks, we’ve put measures in place to help businesses open safely, enable residents to maintain social distancing while shopping and encourage more active travel like cycling and walking.

As well as signs on streets reminding people to stay two metres apart, this also means putting barriers and cones on roads to widen the footpaths and the temporary closure of some roads and parking bays to leave enough space for people to practice social distancing. 

If you have any suggestions for further social distancing or active travel measures please contact us.

Make a suggestion

Active travel fund

Following the Covid-19 lockdown in early 2020, the Department for Transport (DfT) made funding available through the Emergency Active Travel Fund (EATF) to provide temporary infrastructure to aid social distancing. 

As a result, schemes were rolled out across the country. The DfT has since announced a second round of funding made available to local authorities – this is known as the Active Travel Fund (ATF). Active Travel funding is being made available to spend in 2021/22, and is intended to enhance streets, while providing space to enable non motorised users to observe social distancing.

We  bid for the funding (pdf / 445 KB), after assessing 300 schemes across the county, including some received from the public, interest groups and county councillors. Three schemes included in the bid, to improve facilities for cyclists and pedestrians in Whitby and Harrogate, are going ahead to delivery following our acceptance of more than £1m in funding from the DfT’s Active Travel Fund.

In June 2021 the DfT announced a third round of Active Travel Funding which would make £239m available for schemes across the country.  We have submitted a bid for £1.645m (pdf / 652 KB), which includes five schemes; two capital infrastructure schemes, two feasibility studies and progression to detailed design for a further scheme.

Emergency Active Travel Fund

In tranche 1 the total indicative allocation from the DfT to the council was £266,000 but only 50% funding was awarded following their assessment of the tranche 1 bid. We added match funding of £133,000 to complete all of the schemes set out in the tranche 1 bid given the importance of the proposed measures to the Covid-19 recovery strategy. The schemes that were delivered are listed at the bottom of this page, although it should be noted that most of these temporary schemes have now been removed.

Active Travel Fund Tranche 2

We made an ambitious bid for £1.465m of funding for five schemes after assessing 300 schemes across the county, including some received from the public, interest groups and county councillors, however, the final amount awarded to us was £1,011,750. The schemes in the Tranche 2 bid were: 

  • Oatlands Drive, Harrogate 
  • A59 (Maple Close, Harrogate to Knaresborough) 
  • Victoria Avenue, Harrogate  
  • Guisborough Road. Whitby 
  • Market Place, Helmsley to Kirkdale Lane 

The route from Helmsley to Kirkdale lane was subsequently dropped as it was an additional scheme, which was over and above the allocation.

The proposals for each scheme are shown on the maps below. The intention is to improve access to the town centre, encourage uptake of active modes and allow more space for social distancing. You can read further information about the proposals in our frequently asked questions.

Please note that the Transforming Cities Fund proposals for Harrogate town centre are a separate project and are being consulted on separately to these proposals.

Whitby Cycle Improvements

  • A cycle improvement corridor is proposed to connect the Whitby Park and Ride site at Victoria Farm with Whitby town centre.
  • The route would be provided along Guisborough Road (A171) and Mayfield Road.
  • At Prospect Hill, it is anticipated that cyclists would continue to the town centre along local routes.

A map showing the Whitby cycle improvements as outlined above

Harrogate Cycle Improvements

Three cycle improvement corridors are planned in and around Harrogate:

A59 (Harrogate Road, Knaresborough) between Badger Mount and Maple Close.

A map showing the first part of the Harrogate cycle improvements as outlined above

Oatlands Drive between Hookstone Road and Knaresborough Road.

A map showing the second part of the Harrogate cycle improvements as outlined above

Victoria Avenue near the County Court, between the A61 (West Park) and Station Parade.

A map showing the third part of the Harrogate cycle improvements as outlined above

As part of developing our proposals, a programme of consultation is a condition of the Department for Transport funding and must be undertaken before any scheme can be built (read the  active travel fund consultation plan (pptx / 162 KB)). As a result, we carried out two rounds of engagement with the local communities to get their thoughts about the proposed improvements. 

A list of questions from the engagement can be found below.

The following frequently asked questions are a summary of what was asked at the Whitby public meeting. We have consolidated the questions where there were duplicates and where the responses to those questions would be the same.

The phase 2 consultation has now ended and we are assessing the feedback from the survey.

Scheme Details

  1. Will the cycleway be used by cyclists travelling in both directions?

    Yes, it is intended that cyclists will travel in both directions on the cycle path.

  1. Will the carriageway be narrowed?

    It is intended that the carriageway is narrowed which creates an environment which is conducive of reducing vehicle speeds.

  1. The carriageway is often used by large vehicles accessing Woodthorpe Mine, supermarket delivery trucks and double decker buses. Is there room to reduce the carriageway safely?

    A better understanding of the type of vehicles that use these routes, including the routes they are taking will be undertaken at the next stage of work as we develop the designs further.

  1. Why do we need a cycle path from the Park and Ride? I believe that people use the P&R use the bus service provided. I can't see many cyclists bringing a bicycle to the Park and Ride. Where are these cyclists coming from, they certainly are not local? We could be more productive by providing a footpath/cycle path on the B1410 the Carrs which is a busy narrow road, with heavy traffic, blind corners no speed limit and no footpath. many pedestrians and cyclists use it every day

    The purpose of the plans is to provide the infrastructure to enable/encourage people to travel via active modes with the eventual effect of reducing congestion. The Department for Transport's Gear Change document, which sets out the vision to make England a great walking and cycling nation, states that cycling and walking will be the natural first choice for many journeys with half of all journeys in towns and cities being cycled or walked by 2030. It is anticipated that the route would be used primarily for leisure and employment purposes.
    We  bid for the funding (pdf / 445 KB), after assessing 300 schemes across the county, including some received from the public, interest groups and county councillors.

    Tranche 2 funding can be used to support both temporary, low-cost schemes, and permanent schemes with a short lead time, so long as they meet the criteria outlined below:

    • Can it be delivered in 20/21? (this subsequently changed to 21/22 because of a delay in announcing the funding allocations)
    • Does it replace a well used bus route?
    • Does it provide a segregated cycle /pedestrian route or close roads to traffic?
    • Does it cater for BOTH cycling AND walking?
    • Can it be delivered for less than our allocation of £1.065m?

    This is a challenging set of criteria and a significant number of potential schemes had to be ruled out because of deliverability or cost, including the Carrs road. This schemes put forward to be funded are those that best fit the EATF criteria.

    We are optimistic that should this scheme be delivered; further funding opportunities will enable us to deliver a more comprehensive route.

  1. Will the Tin Ghaunt car park be a charging point for bikes?

    This is out of the scope of the Active Travel Fund.

The following frequently asked questions are a summary of what was asked at the Harrogate public meeting. We have consolidated the questions where there were duplicates and where the responses to those questions would be the same.

We recognised that some of the questions asked were not published for public viewing during the meeting. this was an administration error and we can confirm that the majority of the questions that were not published were asked in the meeting. All question submitted have been included below.

The phase 2 consultation has now ended and we are assessing the feedback from the survey.

Scheme Details

General

  1. Why are the proposed crossings raised platforms only and not zebra/parallel type crossings, which clearly prioritise people crossing the roads, instead of drivers?

    The raised platform solution is intended to compliment the other traffic calming measures proposed in the area. The proposal will be reviewed in light of the Governments cycling design guidance (LTN 1/20) and the national roll out of Tiger Crossings. As an example, the review could lead to a change to our proposals to include tiger crossings on raised platforms intended to get improved driver compliance. A Safety Audit will also be undertaken.

  1. Speed humps are a very dated way of managing speed. They increase noise and particulate pollution. Could other measures be considered, please?

    Opportunities to introduce horizontal measures, such as chicanes, will be explored as an alternative to speed humps where appropriate. Speed platforms across the county have offered the best connectivity at cycling and pedestrian crossings and at junctions. The use of speed platforms or alternatives will be reviewed when we get to the next stage of work (Stage 2 - Further Appraisal), however, it should be noted that to enforce a reduction in speed to 20mph such traffic calming measures are a requirement.

  1. What specific proposals are there to improve walking, as opposed to cycling?

    In addition to the cycling improvements there are multiple pedestrian improvements proposed including at the Toucan crossing (at York Place junction), there will be improved pedestrian alignment and safer crossing facilities when crossing Slingsby Walk, dropped crossing points installed at all junctions, with tactile paving arrangements, and if improved cycling facilities are provided at the Toucan crossing at Hookstone Drive junction this would then become a pedestrian only crossing. Overall these measures are complimented by the reduced speed limit and other traffic calming measures which are aimed at providing a safer environment for pedestrians.

  1. What research has been done regarding changing travel behaviours, including investigating other successful and failed schemes?

    As part of our funding allocation for the Active Travel Fund, money has been set aside to allow behaviour change measures to be introduced once the schemes are delivered.

  1. Pedestrians are definitely at risk when sharing spaces with bikes, there is a considerable speed difference and bikes are very quiet. Are you not concerned about accidents?

    Shared use cycling facilities are not proposed as part of these schemes and pedestrian only footways will be retained throughout. Safety Audits will be carried out for all of the proposed schemes to identify any risks.

  1. Floating bus stops sound like a real health and safety issue - will cyclist have to have insurance in case to hit a pedestrian existing or entering a bus?

    Floating bus stops are a design approved by the Department for Transport and have been successfully implemented across the country. This type of bus stop offers safe passage for cyclists removing conflict with bus movements and passing motor vehicles. They also introduce clear, defined crossing points for pedestrians and create an environment conducive to slowing down cyclists, given the presence of pedestrian movements. Safety Audits will be carried out for all of the proposed schemes to identify any risks.

A59

  1. Why doesn't Knaresborough Rd scheme go as far as High Bridge and Waterside? This proposal leaves the cycle lane unconnected to Knaresborough which fails to meet DfT requirements for this funding.

    The A59 is a primary route and due to constraints on High Bridge it is not feasible to extend the mandatory segregated cycle lanes. There is a resurfacing scheme planned for later this year where the cycle lanes will be renewed enabling officers to review the current road marking arrangements (including yellow lines), hatching widths and cycle lanes to afford maximum improved advisory cycle lanes.

  1. Why can't the proposed cycle ways on the A59 be provided on land alongside the road rather than by reducing the road width for other traffic?

    The current shared use cycle path on the south side of the A59 does not meet current cycling design criteria outlined in LTN 1/20, which results in cyclists regularly using the carriageway in conflict with motorists on a 50mph road. On carriageway designated, mandatory, segregated lanes along with a 40mph reduced speed limit will enhance the environment for cyclists and pedestrians and increase/ encourage modal shift.

  1. Are there any plans for cycle provision along the High Street and Knaresborough Road in the near future? Additionally, why is the pedestrian island being removed at Badger Hill bearing in mind the Bus Stop provision on both sides of the main road which serves the residents of Badger Hill (specifically for over 55's?)

    Installation of cycle routes on the High Street and Knaresborough Road is outside the scope of the Active Travel Fund Project at this time; however, there is a long-term aspiration to develop a route in this location subject to the availability of funding.

    Additionally, there are no plans to remove the 'uncontrolled' pedestrian crossing at Badger Hill, only the traffic calming refuge west of the westbound bus stop. We are aware of the need for pedestrians to safely cross the road to the residential estate and could consider installation of a Zebra Crossing as we progress the designs.

Oatlands Drive

  1. What is the point of an advisory cycle lane on Oatlands drive? All it does is provide parking for cars, completely defeating the purpose of the improvements.

    The Department for Transport (DfT) changed the 2016 regulations in respect of cycle lanes, which means that it is not illegal to park in mandatory cycle lanes. It is illegal, however, to encroach into them whilst driving. The DfT guidance now prescribes that waiting restrictions be implemented in Mandatory cycle lanes. Double Yellow Lines will be provided from Slingsby Walk to York Place.

  1. To clarify; will there be access from Oatlands into Wheatlands Road East?

    The proposals introduce a one way filter, similar to the filter provided at South Park Road, you would be able to turn into Wheatlands Road East from Oatlands Drive.

  1. Is the cycle route on Hookstone Wood Road going to be properly connected to Oatland’s Drive with cycle safe measures as this is a very heavily used road by pedestrians and cyclists (particularly as part has no pavements)? 20mph here would be ideal.

    Hookstone Wood Road forms part of the route into the Showground via Hookstone Drive and does not form part of these proposals. This route will be considered for future improvements should further funding opportunities be made available by the DfT in line with NYCC prioritisation process. The Oatlands Drive scheme includes potential changes to the Hookstone Drive/ Hookstone Road junction with the bridge road 55 cycle route south of the junction onto the Showground Greenway which was completed in 2016.

  1. How will the traffic calming measures in the Oatlands area impact access to the area by the emergency services?

    Any traffic calming measures installed by NYCC are in accordance with national design guidelines and legislation and follow extensive research including impact upon emergency services vehicles. It is not considered that any of the measures proposed will have any impact on the emergency services access. Targeted consultation undertaken with emergency services and other road user groups would be undertaken before the scheme is delivered.

  1. Can we have detail of the proposed one-way flow along St Winifred's Road? What signage will there be and what provision for traffic coming from Wetherby Road along St Winifred's Avenue?

    The proposed one-way filter at St Winifreds is intended to prohibit vehicles exiting onto Oatlands Drive. At St Hilda’s drive the filter is intended to prevent entry from Oatlands Drive. The filter will extend 10-15m from the junction of Oatlands Drive so traffic can still travel in both directions on the remainder of the road.

    The two key reasons for introducing the filters were:
     

    1. To simplify movements and improve safety outside of the school
      1. We receive regular complaints about school parking, congestion and manoeuvres around the St Hilda’s Road area between Oatlands and St Catherine’s; by introducing the filter we reduce the number of potential conflicts with vehicles and improve the safety for users.
    2. To prevent rat running through the estate
      1. For vehicles that typically use the streets from Oatlands Drive to access the A661 Wetherby Road it may be deemed too onerous
      2. The filter on St Winifreds (prohibiting vehicles exiting onto Oatlands) is also intended to discourage non-residential access; it is anticipated that many people would avoid the street due to the traffic calming measures slowing them down potentially rendering the journey too onerous.

Traffic Congestion

  1. Will the Oatlands Drive one way system increase carbon emissions as traffic going from the south to St Aidan’s school and houses in the Saints travel further to get round the one way systems?

    The proposal for a one-way system on Oatlands Drive has been removed; however, there will be one way filters at a number of junctions on the route. If the scheme progresses traffic modelling will be undertaken to understand the impacts on the wider area.

  1. How are NYCC going to reduce the pollution and excessive car parking in the Saints residential area? How do NYCC think that the additional cars being forced to access St Winifreds Road are going to be beneficial to the currently unacceptable pollution and parking problems? Additionally, what provisions will NYCC make for the cars which park daily on St Winifreds. Have NYCC considered the chaos that is going to ensue, not to mention the traffic noise and pollution?

    The purpose of the plans is to provide the infrastructure to enable/encourage people to travel via active modes with the eventual effect of reducing congestion. If the scheme is to proceed there will be modelling work undertaken to understand the impact on the area. Parking issues on St Winifreds are not unique to the area and many concerns have been raised by residents across the Saints estate. A full parking review of the Saints would be needed so the issue gets resolved and doesn’t just get displaced. This work cannot be funded by the Active Travel Fund.

  1. How do you plan to reduce carbon emissions by moving traffic from a free flowing junction (St Winifreds Road/Oatlands Drive) to an already heavily congested junction of St Winifreds Avenue/Wetherby Road?

    The purpose of the plans is to provide the infrastructure to enable/encourage people to travel via active modes with the eventual effect of reducing congestion. The Department for Transport's Gear Change document, which sets out the vision to make England a great walking and cycling nation, states that cycling and walking will be the natural first choice for many journeys with half of all journeys in towns and cities being cycled or walked by 2030. We know that not everyone can cycle, which is why we are investing in roads, buses and railways too. It is recognised that in order to facilitate such a change and provide safe passage for non-motorised users longer vehicle journeys in may be required; this can encourage people to choose an alternative mode of transport. If the scheme is to proceed, modelling work will be undertaken to understand the impact on the wider area including the displacement of traffic to other junctions.

  1. Please share the proposed details of the junction of Oatlands Drive and Wheatlands Road East. Wheatlands Road East is a narrow road approx 6-40 metres wide. What restrictions will be introduced to the restriction of the volume of traffic and to parking?

    The intention is to put in a one way filter (see question 14 for details on the filter) on Wheatlands Road East from Wheatlands Road East, vehicles will be prohibited from leaving Wheatlands Road East onto Oatlands Drive (except Cyclists).

  1. Can you tell us how many cycles use Victoria Avenue - I am not sure I have seen a cycle on Victoria Avenue?

    This detail is obtained as part of Stage 2 - Further Appraisal. It is anticipated that if the scheme goes ahead cycle counts could be used as one of the success criteria when monitoring and evaluating the scheme.

  1. How does the cycle route along Hookstone Wood Road from the showground feed into this?

    The proposal delivers improvements at the Hookstone Road junction to make it more efficient, this will better facilitate the link to the showground. Hookstone Wood Road forms part of the route into the Showground via Hookstone Drive (see question 12 for more detail) and does not form part of these proposals. This route will be considered for future improvements should further funding streams be released by the DfT in line with NYCC prioritisation process. The Oatlands Drive scheme includes potential changes to the Hookstone Drive/ Hookstone Road junction with the bridge road 55 cycle route south of the junction onto the Showground Greenway which was completed in 2016.

  1. Have you considered the full impact on traffic congestion around St Winifreds Avenue and Wetherby Road before making these proposals?

    Traffic Modelling carried out to help us understand the wider impact of a scheme is completed as part of Stage 2 of the Transport Appraisal Process - Further Appraisal.

Speed Restrictions

  1. Please can you provide more information on the Saints area 20 mph proposal, which was referenced in the press coverage of the issue but is not referred to expressly on the council website? Will this link through to the cycle route through the show ground (and therefore encompass Hookstone Wood Road which is currently part 20, part 30).

    The proposal includes a 20mph zone between York Place and Hookstone Drive. As part of the introduction of a 20mph limit on Oatlands Drive we are exploring the options to extend this into thee surrounding roads, including Oatlands Drive, Hookstone Drive and Wetherby Road. Many of the surrounding roads are already subject to traffic calming and mean speeds are likely to be within the accepted speeds commensurate with 20mph limits.

  1. I'd like details of exactly what the new junction at Hookstone Drive will look like? Why isn't St John Fishers school included in the 20MPH initiative all school zones should be 20MPH?

    The County Council has received many requests for a 20mph speed limit on Hookstone Drive. Speed surveys have shown that existing mean speeds on Hookstone Drive are too high for a 20mph limit. Additionally, an assessment of collision history has previously shown that the road does not meet the criteria for introducing further traffic calming measures which would engineer a reduction of motorist’s speeds and driving behaviour to a level suitable for a 20mph limit. Hookstone Drive cycling facilities and speed limit will be continually reviewed and prioritised for future funding streams/ bids.

  1. Given the average car journey in Harrogate is 1.6 miles, could we have 20mph speed limit throughout the town without adding to journey times significantly and possibly improving them through steady gentle flow being enhanced rather than the stop-start at present. This would transform the experience of all pedestrians and cyclists in one simple move.

    NYCC continue to monitor the effect of area wide 20mph speed limit trials across the country with a view to considering their application across the county. Additionally, wider schemes that impact the town centre, such as Transforming Cities Fund, are looking to change the way that we access/use the town centre particularly in private vehicles and encourage an uptake of active modes which is complimentary to objectives of the Active Travel Fund.

  1. Will the Police monitor the 20mph areas? Previously the Police have never supported and refuse to monitor 20mph area. Experience of over 17 years on Hookstone Chase.

    We hope the features proposed will make the restrictions as self-enforcing as possible, however, as with any reduction of speed we consult with the police to ensure they support the measures before we implement them.

  1. Why do 20mph zones have to be self-enforcing, but 30mph don't, and are very frequently ignored, e.g. in the town centre on Station Parade

    30mph is the national speed limit in built up areas. 20mph speed limits have, to date, been generally over smaller geographic areas and often single streets which present enforcement difficulties for the police. All speed restrictions will be installed in line with national legislation and guidance.

  1. It would be very helpful to include some flashing 20mph signs (measuring speed) on Oatlands Drive as part of the scheme; they seem to work quite well on Cold Bath Road at slowing traffic down.

    It is considered that effective speed reduction features will appropriately moderate driver behaviour and their speeds removing the need for Vehicle Activated Signs which are generally more effective as short term targeted driver awareness campaigns.

Public Transport

  1. What access and extra public transport will there be for elderly and disabled people? There is no mention of these vulnerable groups in these plans and thus could be construed as discrimination.

    There are no plans to increase provision of public transport as part of the Active Travel Fund scheme. The proposals are intended to make improvements for all non-motorised users including the elderly and disabled.

  1. We need a much better bus service if we are going to encourage people out of their cars, it is not just about cycling and walking, not always an option for everyone.

    One of the recommendations from the Harrogate Congestion Study was to boost Public Transport. NYCC has invested £10m in the Harrogate to York Railway Line to double the frequency of journeys available for passengers. NYCC also spends £1.5m per year subsidising rural bus services and £7m concessionary fayres. Bus services in Harrogate are modern and frequent and we would encourage people to use these services more often. Additionally, Government recently introduced the National Bus Strategy, which is out to consultation, but is aimed at promoting better use and service offerings of buses, there is money available nationally to deliver such improvements and NYCC is considering its approach to this opportunity. Impact of the proposals on buses in the area will be picked up through the modelling, which, if the scheme proceeds, will take place as part of the next stage of work (Stage 2 - Further Appraisal).

  1. The buses are great - but they are very expensive compared to private car use and parking. It costs £10.80 for a family of four to go into town on the 36, which is why we don't use it.

    Typically, the operators are commercially driven and they set the fayres, however, there may be an opportunity as part of the National Bus Strategy previously mentioned that can enable us to work with operators to mitigate such issues.

The Stray

  1. Why can't the Stray be used for additional cycling routes alongside roads such as Oatlands Drive, Beech Grove and Knaresborough Road?

    The funding is to use on our Highway Network and cannot be used for changes on The Stray. The Stray falls under the parliamentary Stray Act 1994, any change of use for this land requires a change of the by-laws. Recently some of the by-laws were revisited, and although successful, there was a lengthy process which would likely be prohibitive for the delivery window for the Active Travel Fund (delivery must be complete by 31 March 2022). Additionally a number of trees on The Stray are protected, so extending carriageway widths etc. would make delivery difficult.

  1. Will there be double yellow lines on both sides of Oatlands alongside The Stray to prevent cars blocking the cycle lanes?

    Yes, double yellow lines would be installed on the Northbound and Southbound carriageways between Slingsby Walk and York Place. The proposal will be reviewed to ensure it meets the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions regulations at Stage 2 - Further Appraisal.

  1. Along Slingsby walk there is no segregation between cyclists and pedestrians. If the volume of use increases this could be hazardous. There are already problems now between Oatlands Drive and Stray Rein

    NYCC will monitor the usage of Oatlands Drive and neighbouring cycle routes on completion of any successful scheme and moving forward. At the current time, there is no justification to widen the current shared use lanes however, which would require extensive changes to the Stray Act, which is often a lengthy process. It is worth noting there are a number of protected trees along this route too.

Process

  1. What is the process for any public approval of the detailed plans?

    The next stage of work is detailed design, a further round of consultation will take place once these are completed. Additionally, applying changes to or implementing new parking and waiting restrictions, or prohibited/ prescribed movements to vehicular traffic require new/ amendments to TROs, which include statutory advertising and consulting procedures. All schemes must be delivered by March 2022.

  1. Why are schemes not all LTN 1/20 standard?

    The designs were produced before the LTN 1/20 guidance note was issued by Government. We have since reviewed the designs to try to adhere to the standard where possible and as we move into Stage 2 - Further Appraisal we will review these widths. All schemes will be reviewed with the Department for Transport and discussions around any requirements for departure from standard will take place.

  1.  So is there a whole town plan or are these schemes stand-alone. Can you publish in the paper the whole area plan?

    There is a Cycling Plan for Harrogate published on the County Council Website (northyorks.gov.uk/local-cycling-and-walking-infrastructure-plans-lcwips). All schemes and initiatives in the area are cumulative and will eventually have the effect of making it more attractive for our residents to walk and cycle. We presented a the slide at the meeting showing the existing and proposed cycle route network although unfortunately some of these schemes do not have funding for delivery yet.

Other Schemes

  1. Please can you clarify what you mean by delivery of the Otley Road cycle path? As far as I can tell it's overdue by approximately two years.

    As part of the National Productivity Investment Fund (NPIF) a new off carriageway cycle route will be introduced/ constructed. Among the planned upgrades are improvements to junctions on Otley Road including smart traffic lights, extra traffic lanes, a new off road cycle lane to link into the developing cycle network and new or improved pedestrian crossings. These engineering measures will be complimented by an investment into the ‘softer’ measures such as publicity and education regarding sustainable travel. This has been delayed due to The Stray Act 1994 and some issues with utilities but work is underway on this. More information about the utilities work can be found here.

  1. How do you anticipate the shared cycle route up Otley Road will work when the width available is not up to national guidelines and not segregated. I’m thinking particularly about volume of students around the Grammar School?

    The designs were produced before the LTN 1/20 guidance note was issued by Government. We have since reviewed the designs to try to adhere to the standard where possible and as we move into Stage 2 - Further Appraisal we will review these widths. All schemes will be reviewed with the Department for Transport and discussions around any requirements for departure from standard will take place.

  1. What consideration has been given to the provision of a Park & Ride scheme to reduce congestion? The Showground would be one obvious site with other possible locations the land off Skipton Road previously designated for Tesco and land in Pannal.

    As part of the wider Harrogate Transport Improvement Planning (HTIP) work, which is a continuation of the Harrogate Congestion Study, we have produced a report on the potential use of Park and Ride. We will publish the report in the coming months and consider how we intend to deliver the actions from this work.

  1. As a cyclist on Jennyfields I read with interest last year that you had a Harrogate Cycling Plan, and the consultant and council said it was for schemes when money becomes available. One of the schemes is Ripon Road - why is this scheme not been delivered.

    Our Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plans (LCWIP’s) are available to view on our website here Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plans (LCWIPs) | North Yorkshire County Council.

    The LCWIP’s produce a short, medium and longer-term plan for cycling infrastructure investment when funding becomes available, it gives us a list of priorities (and an explanation for each of the priorities). For the longer term, Harrogate’s LCWIP provides an indicative delivery programme for the next 10 years but this relies on funding being made available to us. Ripon Road is, amongst other routes, identified as a longer-term ‘indicative route’ in that programme.

  1. In Cllr Mackenzie's column in this weeks' Harrogate Advertiser, he mentioned that 'As part of the Oatlands Drive scheme it is also hoped to install a controlled crossing on Wetherby Road to benefit walkers and cyclists using Slingsby Walk on the Stray. This would be fantastic, can you please let us know if this will be possible?

    It could be deliverable if there was a suitable funding opportunity. This has been noted as a recommendation.

  1. What are you doing about introducing low traffic neighbourhoods especially around Oatlands Drive?

    We have introduced a low traffic neighbourhood already on Beech Grove through an Experimental Order which gives the Council 18 months to trial the scheme to understand whether it works or not. There have been mixed views about the existing scheme but once the outcome of this scheme has been realised we will use this as evidence/example for if and how we introduce them elsewhere. Active monitoring of any schemes that are implemented will be undertaken.

    The one-way filters proposed on St Hilda's and St Winifreds are intended to discourage through traffic (in addition to the deterrent caused by complimentary traffic calming measures). Based on feedback received in the consultation to date, further filters to discourage through traffic are being considered as part of the design work.

  1. How exactly is the LTN scheme at Beech Grove being monitored and how are you monitoring the knock-on effects on surrounding roads?

    Beech Grove Low Traffic Neighbourhood (LTN) is a seperate scheme. the monitoring and evaluation criteria for the LTN includes pre and post-trial road safety audits, traffic and air quality monitoring, parking surveys, cycling and walking audits etc. As LTN’s are typically not DfT funded schemes there is no specific Government guidance for Local Authorities to follow in terms of measuring the success of an LTN, however, the leading Local Authority implement such LTN trials through an Experimental Traffic Order which enables monitoring of the defined success measures along with the ability to alter/tweak the scheme throughout.

General Comments

  1. Is there any statistical evidence to show that those who dislike a scheme are more likely to object than those who agree with a scheme are likely to lodge supporting comments?

    No, we have no evidence to suggest that those who dislike a scheme are more likely to object to a scheme than those who agree with a scheme lodging supporting comments.

  1. Although it might make a better environment for walking and cycling in the area, individuals on the saints will still need to commute to work and a significant proportion of individuals do not live within cycling/walking distance of their place of work necessitating car use. It is unlikely that the amount of required car use will change in response to your scheme. The traffic will need to go somewhere and will only result in congestion in other streets.

    The purpose of the plans is to reduce congestion by providing the infrastructure to enable/encouraging people to travel via active modes.

  1. Several references have been made to reducing motorcar traffic. Should you not also be encouraging electric car use? Most people are multiple travel users; that is walkers, cyclists, and drivers. Trips to supermarkets such as Asda and Waitrose are generally made by car because of the weight of shopping and then there's the weather factor, people will use their cars when there is bad weather or they need small children to travel with them etc.

    Recently the County Council and the Local Enterprise Partnership carried out a study to investigate barriers to delivery of electric vehicle charge points across the county. We are planning ahead to 2030 when the sale of new vehicles with an internal combustion engine will be banned and NYCC recognises its responsibility in delivering the infrastructure in the right places to encourage/facilitate a shift to electric vehicles. Unfortunately, a switch to EV's alone will not remove the issues of congestion in the area and so delivering the infrastructure for people to feel safe enough to travel using active modes, such as cycling and walking, is equally important.

  1. If residents' groups have ideas for local transport measures, whom should they contact?

    If they are for active travel. Please send your suggestions online to or ltp@northyorks.gov.uk. For highways improvements please submit them to the relevant area team.

  1. The cycle route on Hookstone Wood Road already exists no need to consider bridle way

    The bridle way that runs south of the Hookstone Drive/ Hookstone Road/ Oatlands Drive already forms part of the Harrogate cycle route and NCN route 67. Hookstone Wood Road route is an additional route that allows access from Hookstone Chase/ east Harrogate via Hookstone Drive and Hookstone Wood Road into the showground and onto NCN67. There is presently a Toucan crossing facility within the junction that will be upgraded to enable improved cyclist crossing from the Bridle Road.

Development

A recommendation on which schemes should progress to the next stage of development was made to BES Executive Members on 21 May 2021. See a copy of the recommendation report. See the decision record. In summary three schemes are progressing through delivery:

  • A59 (Maple Close, Harrogate to Knaresborough) 
  • Victoria Avenue, Harrogate  
  • Guisborough Road. Whitby 

Oatlands Drive has been removed from the Active Travel Fund and will be progressed as a separate feasibility study; we are currently developing the brief and expect to commence work in autumn 2021.

Active Travel Fund Tranche 3

In Tranche 3 there is a total of £239m capital funding available to all local authorities across the UK. We have not been given an indicative allocation for this round of funding but authorities have been told to expect a similar level of funding to that received in 2020/2021.Our indicative allocation was £1,331,000 for tranches 1 and 2 combined. The funding announcement is expected in autumn and our allocation must be spent before March 2023.

To qualify for funding this year, authorities must commit to the following key principles:

  • schemes must comply with LTN 1/20 cycling design standards
  • scheme prioritisation should be linked to the development of Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plans (LCWIPs)
  • schemes must be developed in consultation with local communities
  • all schemes must be supported by Local Authority leaders 

Bids will be assessed in line with the following criteria, which will guide final allocations to authorities:

  • propensity to convert short vehicle journeys into cycling and walking, resulting in carbon, air quality and congestion benefits
  • tackling areas with poor health outcomes and with high levels of deprivation
  • number of people that will benefit from the measures
  • compliance with the key principles above

The schemes put forward to be funded are those that best fit the tranche 3 criteria. Tranche 3 funding can be used to support a range of scheme types and can also be used to support feasibility studies and scheme design as well as construction.

In tranche 2 of the ATF we received a large volume of requests for various improvements for pedestrians and cyclists from members of the public, county councillors and other interest groups. Officers have revisited these suggestions and assessed them against the tranche 3 criteria, however, a large number of schemes were immediately ruled out due to deliverability within the timescales of this funding or cost. The remaining schemes were then tested against the criteria outlined above.

Following the input from stakeholders and analysis of potential schemes against the tranche 3 criteria the following capital schemes have been identified as appropriate to take forward:

Scheme name Description Cost
Kildwick to Silsden and Airedale

Proposal to improve a 3km stretch of towpath (1km in Bradford, 2km in North Yorkshire / Craven) between Kildwick and Silsden. This funding will cover the construction of the North Yorkshire section.

This scheme is ready for construction subject to funding. The scheme would be led by Canals and Rivers Trust, using their project managers. The scheme will improve access to recreation for leisure and health purposes.

In Airedale we will deliver enhancements to aid accessibility to the Kildwick to Silsden link. The improvements include improved connectivity from Cross Hills to towpath (at Priest Bank Road), including widening of the pedestrian underpass under roundabout and provision of ramped access onto canal at Cononley Lane End / A629.

£800,000 +£100,000

Ripon West Sustainable Travel Corridors Delivery of features to reduce design speeds to encourage trips by active modes in the Clotherholme Road / Kirby Road area of Ripon. This scheme would have benefits for a number of schools in the area and also provide access to the town centre from residential areas and any future developments in the area. Measures could include footway-widening, provision of crossing facilities and traffic calming measures (including speed reduction). £550,000
Helmsley Marketplace to Kirkbymoorside

Development funding to undertake feasibility work for a fully segregated foot/cycleway between Helmsley and Kirkbymoorside alongside the busy A170 to enhance access to employment and facilities for residents, tourists and workers.

£50,000
Knaresborough to Flaxby Green Park Industrial Site

Development funding to undertake feasibility work for a fully segregated foot/cycleway (approximately 7km long) between Knaresborough and Flaxby Green Park alongside the rail line to provide access to key employment and residential sites along the route. Links to wider plans to deliver a cohesive route to York.

£50,000
Brayton to Selby Detailed Design Brayton to Selby Corridor was included in the Phase 2 Selby LCWIP to the outline design stage. We will develop this work to detailed design stage. £95,000

Emergency Active Travel Fund: Temporary Measures

Following the Covid-19 lockdown in early 2020, the Department for Transport (DfT) made funding available through the Emergency Active Travel Fund (EATF) to provide temporary infrastructure to aid social distancing. As a result, schemes were rolled out across the county these included;

Filey

Belle Vue Street Some parking bays suspended
Murray Street Parking bays suspended - disabled parking bays open

Harrogate

Montpellier Hill Some parking bays suspended
The Ginnel Road closed between 5pm and 11pm Wednesday to Saturday and 1pm to 11pm on Sundays.

Knaresborough

High Street

Barriers in place to widen sections of footpath

Market Place

Road closed on Market Day (6am to 5pm Wednesday) only.
Castlegate, from Brymore ice Cream to Market Tavern

Road closed on Market Day (6am to 5pm Wednesday) only.

Northallerton - Wednesdays only

High Street

Road closed on market days from Friarage Street roundabout to Romanby Road.

Additional road closure on Thursday 3 and Thursday 24 December from 5:30am to 7pm for extra market days.

Scarborough

St Nicholas Street Some parking bays suspended
Pedestrian precinct Hours during which cars are not allowed extended to 10am to 5pm

Whitby

A174

Raithwaite Chipping Dump (between Sandsend and Whitby Barrier) closed

Pier Road

Weekdays - closed from 10:30am to 6:00pm.

Weekends - closed from 10.30am until safe to reopen to allow for pedestrians queuing 

St Ann's Staith and Khyber Pass Weekdays - closed from 10:30am to 6:00pm.
New Quay Road, Whitby Swing Bridge and Lower Church Street (from junction with Green Lane) Closed weekends and Bank Holidays however we will try to accommodate essential access when safe to do so. It is expected that the roads will be closed between 10:30am and 6pm.