Tour de Yorkshire

Details of the Tour de Yorkshire 2018 bike race including road closures, race route plus stage and race information.

North Yorkshire’s roads will again play a significant part in the Tour de Yorkshire cycle race this year. The Tour de Yorkshire has been extended to four days and will run from Thursday 3 May to Sunday 6 May 2018. The extra day will allow the women’s race to increase from one to two days, taking place on 3 and 4 May.

The Tour de Yorkshire is a great chance to get out and about in North Yorkshire to see a world class field of cyclists taking part.

Tour de Yorkshire 2018 routes

Men's race

Stage one, on Thursday 3 May, starts in Beverley and ends in Doncaster. It will cover 182km, with none of the route in North Yorkshire. The route will take in Beverley, Hornsea, Pocklington, Howden and Doncaster.

View details of the stage one men's race.

Women's race

Stage one, on Thursday 3 May, starts in Beverley and ends in Doncaster. It will cover 132.5km, with none of the route in North Yorkshire. The route will take in Beverley, Pocklington, Howden and Doncaster.

View details of the stage one women's race.

Men's race

Stage two, on Friday 4 May, start in Barnsley and ends in Ilkley. It will cover 149km, with 16km (13 per cent) in North Yorkshire. The route will take in Barnsley, Penistone, Pontefract, Castleford, Otley and Ilkley.

View details of the stage two men's race.

Women's race

Stage two, on Friday 4 May, start in Barnsley and ends in Ilkley. It will cover 124km. The route will take in Barnsley, Pontefract, Castleford, Otley and Ilkley.

View details of the stage two women's race.

Stage three, on Saturday 5 May, starts in Richmond and ends in Scarborough. It will cover 184km, all in North Yorkshire. The route takes in Richmond, Catterick Garrison, Leyburn, Bedale, Northallerton, Thirsk, Sutton Bank, Helmley, Pickering, Filey and Scarborough.

View details of the stage three men's race.

Stage four, on Sunday 6 May, starts in Halifax and ends in Leeds. It covers 189.5km, with 130km (71 per cent) in North Yorkshire. The route takes in Halifax, Hebdon Bridge, Haworth, South Craven, Skipton, Kettlewell, Middleham, Masham, Pateley Bridge, Otley and Leeds.

View details of the stage four men's race.

Road closures

Similar to previous year's races, there will be rolling road closures in place and these are expected to last for around an hour. Some areas, including the start and finish locations, some of the climbs and some of the busier locations, will require longer road closures to ensure the safety of the race and spectators. The impact in terms of road closures and parking restrictions will be kept to a minimum. There will also be parking restrictions in place along the race route.

You can click on a highlighted road on this map to see closure times and other details. You can also zoom out or drag the map to view a different area of the county. Tables listing the road closures can be found further down the page.

 

Stage two will take place on Friday 4 May.

Men's race road closures in North Yorkshire

Location Expected race arrival Expected rolling road closure
Weeton 4.46pm to 4.59pm 4.15pm to 5.30pm
Weston 5.35pm to 5.53pm 5pm to 6.15pm
Askwith 5.36pm to 5.54pm 5pm to 6.15pm

Women's race road closures in North Yorkshire

Location Expected race arrival Expected rolling road closure
Weeton 11.43am to 12.01pm 11.10am to 12.25pm
Weston 12.21pm to 12.44pm 11.35am to 12.50pm
Askwith 12.08pm to 12.29pm 11.35am to 12.50pm

Stage three will take place on Saturday 5 May.

Stage three road closures in North Yorkshire

Location Expected race arrival Expected rolling road closure
Richmond 1.10pm Market place closed 6am to 23.59pm
Catterick 1.20pm 12.50pm to 1.50pm
Bellerby 1.33pm to 1.34pm 12.50pm to 1.50pm
Leyburn 1.36pm to 1.37pm 1pm to 2pm
Constable Burton 1.44pm to 1.47pm 1.20pm to 2.20pm
Patrick Brompton 1.52pm to 1.56pm 1.20pm to 2.20pm
Crakehall 1.55pm to 1.59pm 1.20pm to 2.20pm
Bedale 2pm to 2.04pm 1.30pm to 2.30pm
Leeming Bar 2.04pm to 2.09pm 1.30pm to 2.30pm
Morton-on-Swale 2.10pm to 2.15pm 1.40pm to 2.40pm
Ainderby Steeple 2.12pm to 2.17pm 1.40pm to 2.40pm
Northallerton 2.15pm to 2.21pm 1.45pm to 2.45pm
Thornton-le-Street 2.30pm to 2.38pm 2pm to 3pm
Thirsk 2.36pm to 2.44pm 2pm to 3pm
Sutton-under-Whitestonecliffe 2.44pm to 2.53pm 2.15pm to 3.15pm
Côte de Sutton Bank 2.50pm to 2.59pm 10.30am to 4.30pm
Helmsley 3.06pm to 3.17pm 2.40pm to 3.40pm
Kirkbymoorside 3.19pm to 3.30pm 2.45pm to 4pm
Pickering 3.34pm to 3.47pm 3pm to 4.15pm
Thornton-le-Dale 3.41pm to 3.55pm 3pm to 4.15pm
Allerston 3.47pm to 4.02pm 3.15pm to 4.30pm
Ebberston 3.50pm to 4.05pm 3.15pm to 4.30pm
Snainton 3.53pm to 4.09pm 3.15pm to 4.30pm
West Ayton 4.03pm to 4.20pm 3.30pm to 4.45pm
Hackness 4.13pm to 4.30pm 3.45pm to 5pm
Côte de Silpho 4.16pm to 4.34pm 1pm to 5.30pm
Silpho 4.16pm to 4.34pm 1pm to 5.30pm
Scalby 4.25pm to 4.44pm 4pm to 5.15pm
Scarborough 4.29pm to 4.48pm 4pm to 5.15pm
Filey 4.48pm to 5.09pm 4.15pm to 5.35pm
Muston 4.56pm to 5.17pm 4.30pm to 5.45pm
Cayton 5.08pm to 5.31pm 4.40pm to 6pm
Seamer 5.14pm to 5.38pm 4.40pm to 6pm
Scarborough entry 5.17pm to 5.41pm Foreshore Road closed 3pm to 6pm
Sandside closed 1pm to 6pm
Scarborough finish 5.26pm to 5.51pm North Bay (Marine Drive and Royal Albert Drive) closed 6am to 11.59pm

Stage four will take place on Sunday 6 May.

Stage four road closures in North Yorkshire

Location Expected race arrival Expected rolling road closure
Sutton-in-Craven 1.09pm to 1.14pm 12.40pm to 1.40pm
Skipton 1.18pm to 1.24pm 12.50pm to 1.50pm
Embsay 1.26pm to 1.33pm 12.50pm to 1.50pm
Côte de Bardon Moor 1.31pm to 1.39pm 1pm to 2pm
Burnsall 1.43pm to 1.52pm 1.15pm to 2.20pm
Threshfield 1.50pm to 2pm 1.15pm to 2.20pm
Kettlewell 2.05pm to 2.16pm 1.30pm to 2.35pm
Côte de Park Rash 2.12pm to 2.24pm 10.30am to 4.30pm
Horsehouse 2.25pm to 2.38pm 10.30am to 4.30pm
Carlton 2.31pm to 2.45pm 2pm to 3.20pm
Middleham 2.39pm to 2.54pm 2pm to 3.20pm
East Witton 2.46pm to 3.02pm 2.15pm to 3.20pm
Masham 3.02pm to 3.19pm 2.30pm to 3.45pm
Kirkby Malzeard  3.13pm to 3.31pm 2.30pm to 3.45pm
Pateley Bridge 3.34pm to 3.55pm 3pm to 4.15pm
Côte de Greenhow Hill 3.41pm to 4.03pm 8am to 5pm
Greenhow Village 3.42pm to 4.04pm 8am to 5pm
Thruscross 3.53pm to 4.16pm 3.20pm to 4.40pm
Blubberhouses 3.58pm to 4.21pm 3.20pm to 4.40pm

The colourful and creative publicity caravans travel ahead of the riders each day.

Stage 3

Location Expected time of arrival
Catterick garrison 11:06am to 11:16am
Bedale 11:26am to 11:36am
Thirsk 12:44pm to 12:54pm
Helmsley 1:27pm to 1:37pm
Pickering Sprint Point 2:10pm to 2:20pm
Filey 3:50pm to 4:00pm
Scarborough Finish 4:31pm

Stage 4

Location Expected time of arrival
Skipton 11:30am to 11:40am
Masham 13:26pm to 13:36pm
Pateley Bridge 14:09pm to 14:19pm

Race information

We have put together some frequently asked questions to help residents, visitors and businesses. Download the spectator guide for more information.

Where can I watch the race?

Spectators will be able to watch the event for free anywhere along the route but obviously starts, finishes and climb locations will be most popular. The entire race is also broadcast live on ITV4. In 2017 2.2 million spectators lined the route and 9.7 million viewers watched on TV in 180 countries.

How long will the road closures last?

Most closures will be rolling road closures lasting no more than an hour, apart from the start and finish lines and some other stretches of the race route, where the road closures will be longer. Road closures will be managed by the police and signs will be put in place with details of the closures nearer the race weekend. Please remember that roads on and around the race route will be busy. Almost all journeys will be possible in advance of the event, however we recommend taking some additional time for your journey.

Will the road be open to pedestrians and cyclists?

When the rolling road closures come in to force the race will be due to arrive imminently, pedestrians and cyclists should not use the race route during the closure.

How will emergency vehicles deal with the closures?

Emergency services are fully involved with the planning of the event. Over the Tour weekend they will be closely linked to race control, so that should access be required for emergency services this can be managed with the race.

How will carers get to the people they care for during the day?

As the road closures are generally in place for less than an hour, we do not envisage any significant issues for carers to reach their destination. 

Please visit letour.yorkshire.com for information about:

  • what time will the riders go through a certain village or place on the route;
  • where to watch the race;
  • where big screens are; and
  • what other activities are going on around the route.

Can I ride or walk the race route and if so up until what time?

The race route will be open to normal traffic up until the rolling road closures come in to force. Details on timings are available above. Pedestrians and cyclists should not use the race route during the closure.

Can I cross a specific part of the road at a certain time?

Most road closures will be rolling road closures lasting no more than an hour, apart from the start and finish lines and some climbs where the road closures will be longer. Road closures will be managed by the police and will be announced nearer the race weekend.  Pedestrians & cyclist should not use the race route during the closure.

Where are the car parks?

Scarborough park and ride will be open. Find further details about car parking from district councils.

Will my car be towed away if I park on the route?

To help the race pass safely, please do not park your car on the race route. Parking restrictions will be in places across the length of the race route. There will not be a tow away operation in place - however if any cars are found to be causing a major obstruction to the route they will be removed. We recommend that cars are parked off the race route. Parking restrictions will be in place along many stretches of the race route.

Where can I park if I live on the race route?

Please don’t park on the race route from 8am on race day until after the end of race vehicle has passed.

If you live on part of the race route where there will be longer road closures, you should have received some specific information by post – if not, please email tdyinfo@northyorks.gov.uk.

Are there any camp sites near the route?

There are a range of permanent camp sites and caravan parks across the race route area. Further information can be found at the www.campingandcaravanningclub.co.uk.

Are there parking restrictions on the road side for caravans and camper vans?

As with other vehicles - caravans and camper vans should not park on the race route and where possible use designated camping and caravan sites www.campingandcaravanningclub.co.uk.

Will potholes be fixed?

At this time of year following snow, ice and freezing conditions we see an increase in the number of potholes on our roads. This is caused by the freeze-thaw action. Some areas that require maintenance have already been identified by our Highways teams. Repairs will be carried out before race weekend in line with the code of conduct in the Highways Inspection Manual, they will also continue to inspect the route on the lead up to and on race weekend.

If you see a pothole on our roads either on the race route or on another road please report it to us.

How long will the road closures last?

Most closures will be rolling road closures lasting no more than an hour, apart from the start and finish lines and some climbs where the road closures will be longer. Road closures will be managed by the police and will be announced nearer the race weekend. Roads on and around the race route will be busy. Almost all journeys will be possible in advance of the event, however we recommend taking some additional time for your journey and talk to your suppliers about possible delays.

Can I cross a specific part of the road at a certain time?

Most road closures will be rolling road closures lasting no more than an hour, apart from the start and finish lines and some climbs where the road closures will be longer. Road closures will be managed by the police and will be announced nearer the race weekend.  Pedestrians & cyclist should not use the race route during the closure.

Will I receive compensation for loss of earnings due to roads around the business being closed? Can I claim petrol expenses due to all the diversions?

The county council is the highway authority and will be implementing road closure orders and other traffic management arrangements under its statutory powers. There is no general liability in law for loss of trade resulting from a reduction in the number of passers-by or customers and so no liability to pay compensation.

It is a long established principle that traders have no right to any particular level of passing trade and business may fluctuate for a number of reasons. Similarly, there is no liability for inconvenience caused. It is inevitable that with an international event of this nature that there will be some short-term disruption, but it is considered that this will be outweighed by the longer-term benefits to the area.

Can I still receive deliveries to my business during the Tour de Yorkshire?

If you run a business on the race route where closures will be in place, any deliveries or collections scheduled could be impacted. We strongly recommend that you consider rescheduling these to avoid road closure times wherever possible.

How can my business get involved with the race?

A business toolkit has been put together to help Yorkshire-based businesses. Read the business toolkit.

Who was responsible for bringing TdY to Yorkshire?

The race is being organised by Amaury Sport Organisation (ASO) and Welcome to Yorkshire - supported by British Cycling and local authorities throughout Yorkshire.

Is there a tour guide leaflet?

Yes - a spectator guide is available to download at www.letouryorkshire.com and available from tourist information sites along the route and across Yorkshire.

Can the county council provide additional no parking signs for our village?

Working with the race organisers we have identified several areas across the county where additional traffic management is required to assist in the race passing safely. No parking signs and cones will be deployed in these areas in advance of the race weekend.

Why is it called Tour de Yorkshire and not Tour of Yorkshire?

The Tour de Yorkshire race is owned by the ASO, the Amaury Sports Organisation, a French company based in Paris. It therefore has a French name and some of the key climbs have been given a French name as a nod to the French origins of the race. It is organised to build on the success of the 2014 Grand Départ of the Tour de France.

How many spectators are expected?

Around 2.2 million people come out to watch the race in 2017, we hope many more will watch come to watch the race in 2018. The 2017 race generated £64 million for the Yorkshire economy.

Where can I find more information about the Tour de Yorkshire?

You can find further information from:

Where can I view the legal notice showing the temporary traffic regulation order for this event?

You can  view the temporary traffic regulation order here (pdf / 566 KB).

Making the most of the event

To make the most of this great event, planning your tour weekend will help you to enjoy the race and stay safe - spectators are encouraged to walk or cycle instead of driving to locations on the route and to behave responsibly.

If you are going to watch the race, please:

  • think about leaving your car at home - where possible cycle, walk or use public transport to travel to watch the race;
  • avoid parking on the race route at any time during 3 to 6 May;
  • park in designated car parks;
  • respect other road users and "share the road";
  • be careful when walking or cycling to, from or during the race;
  • avoid standing on bridges across the route to watch the race;
  • avoid standing on sections of the route that are narrow, have no verge or have walls with a drop behind them;
  • watch the weather forecast, dress appropriately and check for weather warnings;
  • respect their surroundings and follow the countryside code;
  • keep to footpaths, use gates and stiles and respect signs;
  • preserve and protect our dry stone walls by not climbing, standing or sitting on them;
  • avoid trespassing on private land;
  • respect the race - behave responsibly and be mindful of where you stand to watch the race.  Give maximum space to the race by keeping off the carriageway. Avoid using selfie sticks and don't obstruct the riders. The use of drones for photography is strictly prohibited;
  • keep dogs on a short lead;
  • keep the race route clear until the last riders and the end of race vehicle have passed; and
  • be mindful that the rolling road closures finish once the end of race vehicle has passed.

Transport 

We are working with public transport providers to plan for the event. Some bus and train services may be affected, however, Welcome to Yorkshire and ourselves have been in contact with bus and train companies and most services on the route are still running with minimal interruption. Please check providers websites for more details.

Past event highlights

Watch highlights from the Tour de Yorkshire 2017 on the official Tour de Yorkshire website.

Race route 2017

Stage one

Stage one of the event was on Friday 28 April. It started in Bridlington and ended in Scarborough, covering 173km, with 110km (63 per cent) of those in North Yorkshire. 

The route took in Norton, Malton, Amotherby, Kirby Misperton, Pickering, Sleights, Whitby, Robin Hoods Bay and Scarborough.  This map shows the route of stage one of the race in North Yorkshire (pdf / 2 MB).

Stage one recce with Adam Blythe

 

Stage two

 

Stage two of the event was on Saturday 29 April. It started in Tadcaster and ended in Harrogate, covering 123km, with 108km (88 per cent) in North Yorkshire. 

The route took in Knaresborough, Ripley, Pateley Bridge, Masham, West Tanfield, Ripon, Hampsthwaite and Harrogate.  This map shows the route of stage two of the race in North Yorkshire (pdf / 2 MB).

Stage two recce with Lucy Garner

 

Stage three

 

Stage three of the event was on Sunday 30 April. It started in Bradford and ended in Fox Valley, Sheffield, with approximately 20 per cent of the route in North Yorkshire, 38km of the full 194km. 

The route took in Bolton Abbey, Burnsall, Linton, Skipton and Kildwick.  This map shows the route of stage three of the race in North Yorkshire (pdf / 2 MB).

Stage three recce, part one with Russ Downing

Overall highlights

Women's race

Stage one

Stage two

Stage three

Summary of stage one

Summary of stage two

Videos courtesy of Welcome to Yorkshire and Tour organiser ASO